DESCARTES TO KANT

PHI3DTK

2019

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

This subject will discuss the questions, problems, and issues that preoccupied philosophers in the 17th-and 18th-centuries.  What is the nature of our world, and how do we know about it?  Are there limits to what our senses can tell us about the world?  What is the relation between mind and body?  Is there an objective basis for moral and political obligation?  This is a period with much interaction between science and philosophy, and whose core ideas influenced subsequent metaphysics and epistemology, as well as ethics and political philosophy.  Students will grapple with the ideas of at least four of the following philosophers of the period--Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant--and can expect to read original texts those thinkers wrote, and exchanges between them and critics such as Princess Elizabeth and Mary Astell.  In discussing these exchanges we will also raise questions about the historiography of this period of philosophy, including the maleness and whiteness of philosophy and science, and the relationships between dead philosophers and contemporary thinking.

SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorRob Wilson

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 3 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

PrerequisitesN/A

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsVariousPrescribedVariousVarious

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Learn to read and interpret original philosophical texts

Activities:
In class discussion and class preparation; reading logs
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Cultural Literacy)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

02. Grasp the argumentative dialectic between philosophers who disagree on fundamental issues

Activities:
In class discussion; essay writing
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Cultural Literacy)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

03. Understand the context in which philosophical ideas during the period arose and reflect on that context.

Activities:
In class discussion, reading logs, essay writing.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Cultural Literacy)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Melbourne, 2019, Semester 2, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorRob Wilson

Class requirements

Lecture/Seminar Week: 31 - 43
One 3.0 hours lecture/seminar per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Short essay (1500-1800 words)25 01, 02, 03
Long essay (2500-3000 words)50 01, 02, 03
Reading logs, class quizzes, and weekly exercises.Final grade for this component will be a function of the grades for each component.25 01, 02, 03