PLANT ECOLOGY

BIO2PE

2017

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

In this subject, students are introduced to the functioning of plants with an emphasis on the Australian flora in their environment of low-nutrient soils, aridity, salinity and fire and including how they interact with other organisms through pollination, fruit dispersal and herbivory. Designing and carrying out ecological experiments to measure plant-animal interactions are an integral part of the practical component, as well as developing skills in identification, observation and drawing.

SchoolSchool of Molecular Sciences/LIMS

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorSabine Wilkens

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 2 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites OED1RAL or BIO1CO or approval of the unit coordinator

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Explain current (and speculate on possible future) adaptations of plants to diverse and changing environments.

Activities:
All topics are discussed in lectures; relevant documentaries are shown to illustrate examples; practicals are aligned with lectures, to further illustrate aspects of the topics.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Quantitative Literacy)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

02. Explain current (and speculate on possible future) interactions of plants and animals in a natural ecosystem, by giving examples of herbivory, parasitism, pollination, frugivory and seed dispersal.

Activities:
All topics are discussed in lectures; relevant documentaries are shown to illustrate examples; practicals are aligned with lectures, to further illustrate aspects of the topics.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Quantitative Literacy)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

03. Design and carry out experiments as well as evaluate the results, by using appropriate hypotheses, controls and simple statistical tests for ecological problems.

Activities:
Apart from illustrating aspects of the theory, practicals are also used to illustrate questions of experimental design.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Quantitative Literacy)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)

04. Communicate experimental results in a formal report style, through drawings or a poster.

Activities:
Scientific drawing and writing up practicals in a standard scientific format will be discussed and extensive feedback given on submitted work. Relevant posters are displayed and discussed at every practical sessions.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Quantitative Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Quantitative Literacy)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)

05. Identify the common plants of the box-ironbark forest.

Activities:
Excursions during practical periods to the local bushland will allow students to become familiar with the local flora.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

06. Preserve, display and identify plant material for a weed collection.

Activities:
Examples of weed collections are displayed and discussed. Various perspectives of 'what is a weed?' will be incorporated in lectures.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Bendigo, 2017, Semester 2, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorSabine Wilkens

Class requirements

Laboratory Class Week: 31 - 43
Six 3.0 hours laboratory class per study period on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Lecture Week: 31 - 43
Two 1.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Four practical reports (equivalent to 1,600 words) including one poster30 03, 04, 05
One weed collection including 20 pressed specimens (equivalent to 800 words)20 06
One 2-hour examination50 01, 02, 03