PHILOSOPHY IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY: FROM RUSSELL VS BERGSON TO DERRIDA VS SEARLE

PHI3TCP

2016

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

This subject introduces you to founding figures of 20th century Western philosophy and some key philosophical developments: the relationship between morality and the natural world, the significance of language and/or history for human beings, and/or the use of tools and concepts drawn from logic and the sciences. Although the content and engagement with particular philosophical traditions may vary in any year, a focus on founding figures drawn from the #analytic# tradition (Moore, Russell, Wittgenstein, Ayer, Quine, and Austin) will introduce students to features distinctive of current practices in this tradition: a respect for #common sense# and a strong interest in ordinary linguistic usage. In some years there will also be a focus on figures drawn from the European tradition (Husserl, Adorno, Heidegger, Levinas, Derrida, Badiou, Deleuze) with students studying the methods of reasoning and concepts developed within or across the traditions, including phenomenology, Marxism and Existentialism.

SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorJake Chandler

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 3 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites Must have passed 1 subject from PHI1PPR, PHI1GPI, PHI1CRT or PHI1BAP. All other students require coordinator's approval.

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Analyse and synthesise ideas or arguments you have located and reviewed in the light of your understanding of their place in a philosophical tradition.

Activities:
Essays, on-line and/or individual, class and study group learning activities.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)

02. Compare the cultural context of production of texts drawn from different philosophical traditions and assess the impact on the ideas developed in the texts.

Activities:
Self-assessment sheet.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Ethical & Cultural Awareness (Ethical & Cultural Awareness)

03. Employ appropriate reasoning strategies designed to resolve a complex problem.

Activities:
Essays, on-line and/or individual, class and study group learning activities.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)

04. Formulate a coherent and defensible argument in response to alternative positions.

Activities:
Essays, on-line and/or individual, class and study group learning activities.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)

05. In a small group formulate a shared position in relation to the defensibility of an idea, claim or argument taking into account the relevant views of group members.

Activities:
Small group discussion.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Teamwork (Teamwork)

06. Orally present a philosophical problem, identify the philosophical tradition to which it belongs and raise possible objections in the light of this.

Activities:
Class participation, presentation and completion of self-assessment sheet.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Speaking (Speaking)

07. Write a sustained defence of a philosophical claim based on your critical assessment of an issue at the frontiers of philosophical research and debate in the twentieth century.

Activities:
Essay writing, modelling, feedback on essay.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing (Writing)

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Melbourne, 2016, Semester 2, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorJake Chandler

Class requirements

Lecture Week: 31 - 43
One 2.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via blended.

Seminar Week: 31 - 43
One 1.0 hours seminar per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via blended.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Essay 1600 words40 07, 04, 03, 02, 01, 05
Essay 1600 words40 01, 02, 03, 07, 04, 05
In class and/or on-line written and oral assignments (equivalent to 800 words)20 07, 01, 02, 03, 06