THEORIES OF WORLD POLITICS

POL2TWP

2019

Credit points: 15

This subject addresses La Trobe's Sustainability Thinking Essential. Sustainability Thinking entails deep appreciation of how the choices we make affects the natural, economic, social, political and cultural systems — now and in the future.

Subject outline

This subject provides a comprehensive overview of the major approaches to International Relations (IR) theory. We first examine the purpose and history of IR theory and then consider the following approaches: liberalism; realism; the 'English School'; constructivism; Marxist approaches; critical theory and post-structuralism; post-colonialism; feminist theory and green theory. Students undertake a detailed analysis of the central ideas associated with each theoretical approach, the major proponents of each theory, the historical and political factors which have given rise to each approach, and the opportunities and shortcomings of having such a diverse range of theories competing for analytic and real-world influence. In so doing, this subject addresses La Trobe's Sustainability Thinking Essential. Sustainability Thinking entails deep appreciation of how the theories we adopt and the choices we make affect the natural, economic, social, political and cultural systems - now and in the future.

SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorDaniel Bray

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 2 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites Enrolment in the Bachelor of International Relations and associated double degrees.

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjects POL3TWP

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditions Core subject at 2nd year for the Bachelor of International Relations (ABIR) degree.

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsInternational Relations Theories: Discipline and Diversity, 4th editionPrescribedTim Dunne et al 2016Oxford University Press

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Understand the main ideas and claims of each of the approaches to International Relations (IR) theory

Activities:
Research Essay, Take-home Exam
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Personal and Professional Skills (Ethical behaviour,Study and Learning Skills)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

02. Recognise how IR theories have emerged in response to changing intellectual, political and economic circumstances.

Activities:
Research Essay
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

03. Critically analyse IR theories and apply them to developments in world politics.

Activities:
Essay, take home exam
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

04. Examine how each approach reflects a normative worldview concerning what kind of international system ought to be sustained.

Activities:
Take-home Exam
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Personal and Professional Skills (Ethical behaviour,Study and Learning Skills)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

Subject options

Select to view your study options…

Start date between: and    Key dates

Melbourne, 2019, Semester 2, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorDaniel Bray

Class requirements

Lecture Week: 32 - 43
One 2.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 32 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Tutorial Week: 32 - 43
One 1.0 hours tutorial per week on weekdays during the day from week 32 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Mid-semester Exam (1000 word equivalent)25 01, 02
Research Essay (2000 words)50 01, 02, 03
Take-home Exam (1000 words)25 04