OXYGENATION AND EXERCISE

BIO3OAE

2017

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

This subject examines the control and molecular mechanisms of muscle systems (skeletal, cardiac and smooth) with respect to normal function in terms of growth, development, maturation and exercise-induced changes. Alterations in muscle structure and function after injury or associated with disease will also be explored. The role of blood in providing oxygen and nutrients to muscle systems and how carbon dioxide and other waste products are removed from the blood will also be studied. Material covered in this unit provides a strong foundation for further study in areas such as exercise training, fitness, rehabilitation and research activities involved in muscular diseases.

SchoolSchool of Molecular Sciences/LIMS

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorMichelle Gibson

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 3 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites BIO1CO and BIO1OOS

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsPhysiology (6th ed)PrescribedBerne, R.M., Levy, M.N., Koeppen, B.M. & Stanton, B.A., (2011)MOSBY: ST LOUIS

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Explain current concepts of muscle structure and metabolism and how this meets needs, both at rest and in activity.

Activities:
Muscle structure and metabolism at rest and in activity are discussed in lectures and further explored in practical classes. In discussion groups, students explore novel exercise training methods and their impact on muscle physiology. Assessment will be by examination and group presentation.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Speaking (Speaking)
Teamwork (Teamwork)
Writing (Writing)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)

02. Discuss the adaptive responses of the muscular, respiratory and cardiovascular systems during exercise, after injury, or in a disease state.

Activities:
The responses of muscular, respiratory and cardiovascular systems to exercise, injury and disease are discussed in lectures and discussion groups. Students will explore these in practical classes. A selection of scenarios are made available for students to explore and discuss. Assessment will be by examination, essay and group presentation.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)
Speaking (Speaking)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Writing (Writing)
Teamwork (Teamwork)

03. Discuss how muscle function alters throughout a lifespan which impacts on exercise tolerance.

Activities:
Students will learn about, research and discuss changes in muscle function with aging and its impact on exercise tolerance in lectures, seminars and discussion groups. A range of research papers is made available for students to review , critique and discuss. Assessment will be by examination, essay and group presentation.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Speaking (Speaking)
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)
Teamwork (Teamwork)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Writing (Writing)

04. Integrate the physiology associated with the respiratory and circulatory systems with respect to maintaining sufficient oxygenation and nutrition to muscle tissues under resting conditions and in exercise or disease.

Activities:
Oxygen and nutritional delivery to muscle tissue at rest, during exercise and in diseased conditions is explored in lectures, seminars, and practical classes. In disscussion groups, students explore novel exercise training methods and their impact on respiratory physiology. Assessment will be by examination, essay and group presentation.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Quantitative Literacy/ Numeracy (Quantitative Literacy/ Numeracy)
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)
Speaking (Speaking)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Writing (Writing)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Teamwork (Teamwork)

05. Apply basic knowledge of respiration, cardiovascular function and muscle function in new scenarios associated with disease, environment or exercise as stressors, using experimental data or peer reviewed literature.

Activities:
Respiration and cardiovascular and muscular function in new scenarios are explored in practical exercises and discussion groups. Assessment will be by examination, essay and group presentation.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing (Writing)
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)
Speaking (Speaking)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Teamwork (Teamwork)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)

06. Analyse experimental data using appropriate measurements, units, graphs and calculations to produce a comprehensive report (oral and written).

Activities:
Experimental data are generated in practical classes and discussed in discussion groups and reported on in the group presentation. Assessment will be by examination, essay and group presentation.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Quantitative Literacy/ Numeracy (Quantitative Literacy/ Numeracy)
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Speaking (Speaking)
Writing (Writing)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Teamwork (Teamwork)

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Bendigo, 2017, Semester 1, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorMichelle Gibson

Class requirements

Seminar Week: 10 - 22
One 2.0 hours seminar every two weeks on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via face-to-face.

Lecture Week: 10 - 22
Two 1.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via face-to-face.

Laboratory Class Week: 11 - 22
One 2.0 hours laboratory class every two weeks on weekdays during the day from week 11 to week 22 and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Group presentation (15 minutes)15 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06
Written essay (1500 words)Students are also required to satisfactorily complete six (6) pieces of assigned practical work.25 02, 03, 04, 05, 06
Written examination (2.5 hours)60 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06