MAKING OF THE MODERN WESTERN WORLD VIEW

PHI2MMW

2016

Credit points: 15

This subject addresses La Trobe's Sustainability Thinking Essential. Sustainability Thinking entails deep appreciation of how the choices we make affects the natural, economic, social, political and cultural systems — now and in the future.

Subject outline

Focusing on some major themes in the intellectual development of the western world which continue to inform our own times, from Greek Metaphysics and Ethics, Christian Theology, Modern Politics, and Art, we will be examining this intellectual history with emphasis on the shifts from what we might call the times of the philosopher, the theologian, the political thinker and the artist. We will move from a consideration of philosophy as a representative achievement of antiquity, through the dominance of theology in the middle ages to the attempt to develop theories of a secular politics and autonomous art respectively from the 17th and 18th centuries onwards. In this process we will also encounter the differences that have subsequently been discussed in terms of the competing orientations of empiricism, rationalism and idealism.

SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorToula Nicolacopoulos

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 2 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites One 15 credit point philosophy subject or 30 Humanities credit points or by approval of the subject coordinator

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Learning resources

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsLearning to Live: A User's ManualRecommendedFerry, L. 2012CANONGATE
ReadingsThe passion of the western mind,RecommendedTarnas, R. 1991BALLANTINE

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Critically assess the merits of competing arguments.

Activities:
Complete the reasoning exercises from the LMS subject resources.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)

02. Identify new problems in personal and professional life contexts which would benefit from philosophical analysis.

Activities:
Post your response to the 'Questions Remaining' Forum on the LMS subject.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Life-Long Learning (Life-Long Learning)

03. Identify the cultural context of production of a text from the history of philosophy, compare the former to current times and ideas.

Activities:
In a small group identify one idea or claim in the set text that you believe reveals the author's western European perspective and compare your impression with those of the others in the group.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Teamwork (Teamwork)
Ethical & Cultural Awareness (Ethical & Cultural Awareness)

04. Identify the underlying issues in a complex problem or controversial debate and analyse its structure.

Activities:
Bring to class and discuss in a small group your response to one of the 10 minute writing activity exercises.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Speaking (Speaking)
Ethical & Cultural Awareness (Ethical & Cultural Awareness)
Teamwork (Teamwork)

05. Locate and review an unfamiliar idea or line of argument in the light of your understanding of the intellectual context in which it was formulated and analyse it in relationship to other relevant ideas.

Activities:
Choose one of the 10 minute writing activities from LMS subject resources, think about the question, re-read the relevant set text, conduct a library/internet search and write your own response.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Writing (Writing)

06. Present a position in support of a philosophical claim and raise objections in the light of its historical assumptions, presuppositions or implications.

Activities:
Choose a topic and introduce it for tutorial discussion by providing a clear and informative explanation of a main idea or claim, the problem to which it is addressed and the questions it raises.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Speaking (Speaking)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)

07. Write a sustained defence of a philosophical claim based on your critical assessment of a philosophical problem raised in a text from the history of philosophy.

Activities:
Choose one of the text-based learning activities from the LMS subject resources, read the set text, think about and answer the questions in the order provided being careful identify the main idea or claim of the text.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing (Writing)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)

Subject options

Select to view your study options…

Start date between: and    Key dates

Melbourne, 2016, Semester 1, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorToula Nicolacopoulos

Class requirements

Lecture/Seminar Week: 10 - 22
One 2.0 hours lecture/seminar per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Collaborative Based Learning Week: 10 - 22
One 1.0 hours collaborative based learning every three weeks on any day including weekend during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via online.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Essay 1600 words40 01, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07
Essay 1600 words40 07, 01, 03, 05, 06
In class and/or online written and oral assignments (800 word equivalent)20 07, 01, 02, 05, 06