ADVANCED EXERCISE BIOMECHANICS

EXS3AEB

2016

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

This subject will advance your theoretical and practical understanding of exercise and sports biomechanics. In this subject you will explore the relationship between biomechanical principles of human movement that underpin common activities of daily living to observe, describe, measure and analyse gross body movements relevant to performance in sport and exercise. This subject will examine the biomechanics of human walking and running gait and the changes which occur with development and ageing. This subject will introduce you to principles of tissue mechanics and will explore the contribution of biomechanics to the field of sports injury prevention.

SchoolLa Trobe Rural Health School

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorKane Middleton

Available to Study Abroad StudentsNo

Subject year levelYear Level 3 - UG

Exchange StudentsNo

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites Must pass EXS2ESB and must be enrolled in one of HBESB, HBES Bachelor of Exercise Science or HZESPB Bachelor of Exercise Science/Master of Exercise Physiology. All other students require Subject Coordinator's approval.

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Learning resources

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsBiomechanical evaluation of movement in sport and exercise.RecommendedPayton, C J & Bartlett, R M 2008ROUTLEDGE, LONDON.
ReadingsFundamental Biomechanics of Sport and ExerciseRecommendedWatkins, J 2014ROUTLEDGE, OXON
ReadingsGait analysis: normal and pathological function.PreliminaryPerry, J & Burnfield, J 20102ND EDN, SLACK INC, NJ.
ReadingsWhittle's gait analysis.PreliminaryLevine, D, Richards, J & Whittle, M 20125TH EDN, CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE, PA.

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Evaluate the stages of development and patterns of muscular activity for normal gait, and identify biomechanical parameters that are commonly assessed in clinical gait analysis.

Activities:
Lectures: methods of gait analysis; applications of gait analysis; gait cycle and phases of gait; development of normal gait at the foot, ankle, knee, hip, head, trunk, pelvis and arms. Seminar tasks: evaluation of experimental research on the development of normal gait. Practical tasks: collect temporal-spatial, kinematic and kinetic data during common exercise movements and identify the muscle groups involved in each exercise.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline Specific Competencies (Discipline Specific Competencies)
Teamwork (Teamwork)
Writing (Writing)

02. Critically explore the major changes in the patterns of gait and muscular activity that occur with aging and pathological function.

Activities:
Lectures: pathological gait conditions. Seminar tasks: group evaluation of experimental research in relation to gait analysis and pathological conditions (ie. obesity, rheumatoid arthitis, osteoarthritis, cerebral palsy, amputations); discussion on the influence of walking aids on normal gait function. Practical tasks: investigate the role of increased body mass on the biomechanical parameters of human gait and muscular activity.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline Specific Competencies (Discipline Specific Competencies)
Writing (Writing)
Speaking (Speaking)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)

03. Explore the biomechanical properties of human tissue and analyse adaptations to loading, over and under use, nutrition, aging and pathological function.

Activities:
Lectures: biomechanical characteristics of tissue (ie. muscle, tendon, nerve, ligaments, bone, cartilage); joint and muscle force analysis; inverse dynamics; muscle and tissue response to training, injury, loading, nutrition and aging. Seminar tasks: evaluation of experimental research in relation to shock and vibration responses of the human body. Practical tasks: EMG analysis of muscular action; dynamometry assessment of muscular strength.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline Specific Competencies (Discipline Specific Competencies)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Speaking (Speaking)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Writing (Writing)

04. Evaluate injury occurrence and predisposing factors across sport and exercise performance and evaluate treatment methods after injury.

Activities:
Lectures: common injuries to the body and methods of occurrence; predisposing factors to injury; role of biomechanics in the assessment, prevention and treatment of common injuries; treatment methods (ie. cold, heat, massage, taping). Seminar tasks: group evaluation of experimental research in relation to rehabilitation. Practical tasks: biomechanical assessment of lower limb injury prevention using force platforms.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing (Writing)
Discipline Specific Competencies (Discipline Specific Competencies)

05. Critically assess appropriate measurement methods and perform and report biomechanical measurements involving temporal-spatial, kinematic and kinetic quantities.

Activities:
Practical tasks: biomechanical testing to include 2-D motion analysis; assessment of temporal-spatial, kinematic and kinetics parameters of human gait, force and pressure measurements; EMG analysis, isokinetic dynamometry.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Teamwork (Teamwork)
Discipline Specific Competencies (Discipline Specific Competencies)

06. Analyse and evaluate biomechanical data in order to solve quantitative problems involving linear and angular kinematic and kinetic quantities.

Activities:
Seminar tasks: case study questions. Practical tasks: analyse data collected in-class and apply the appropriate calculations in order to report data correctly.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing (Writing)
Discipline Specific Competencies (Discipline Specific Competencies)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Bendigo, 2016, Semester 2, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment size125

Enrolment information Limited staffing resources. Tables applying quota. Once quota reached, further enrolments will be subject to approval by Subject Coordinator.

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorMichael Kingsley

Class requirements

Laboratory Class Week: 31 - 43
One 2.0 hours laboratory class per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.
"Max class size reflects lab and equipment - health and safety."

Lecture Week: 31 - 43
One 1.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via blended.

Seminar Week: 31 - 43
One 1.0 hours seminar per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via blended.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
One 1.5-hour theory examination.40 01, 03, 05
One 2,000-word laboratory report.40 01, 03, 04
One group presentation (five minutes per member).20 02, 03, 04, 06

Melbourne, 2016, Semester 2, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorKane Middleton

Class requirements

Laboratory Class Week: 31 - 43
One 2.0 hours laboratory class per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Lecture Week: 31 - 43
One 1.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via blended.

Seminar Week: 31 - 43
One 1.0 hours seminar per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via blended.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
One 1.5-hour theory examination.40 01, 03, 05
One 2,000-word laboratory report.40 01, 03, 04
One group presentation (five minutes per member).20 02, 03, 04, 06