MOTOR CONTROL AND LEARNING

EXS2MCL

2016

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

Inthis subject you will investigate the areas of movement development, movementcontrol and movement disorders. You will explore the neuro-anatomical andneurophysiological bases for developing and controlling movement. Specificattention will be given to the motor and sensory components of the central andperipheral nervous systems in relation to normal movement and disorderedmovement of the human body.

SchoolSchool of Allied Health

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorDawson Kidgell

Available to Study Abroad StudentsNo

Subject year levelYear Level 2 - UG

Exchange StudentsNo

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites HBS1HBB and students must be enrolled in the Bachelor of Exercise (Melbourne and Bendigo) and the Bachleor of Exercise Science and Master of Exercise Physiology (Bendigo).

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Learning resources

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
Discipline SpecificAdvanced Neuromuscular Exercise PhysiologyPrescribedPhillip Gardner (2011)Human Kinetics

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Describe how the anatomical and physiological characteristics of the nervous and sensory systems constrain movement

Activities:
Face-to-face lectures and on-line content. Workshops: case-based enquiries. Practicals: practicals exploring neuro-physiological responses.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)

02. Discuss how muscle activation and recruitment contribute to movement control.

Activities:
Face-to-face lectures and on-line content. Practicals: gym-based practicals exploring 1-joint, 2-joint and multi-joint muscle activation.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Writing (Writing)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)

03. Explain key concepts related to the physical and electrical properties of neurons and motor neurons

Activities:
Face-to-face lectures and on-line content. Workshops: case-based enquiries. Practicals: assessments of posture and balance including Borg Balance scale, STAR excursion test, single leg stance, and investigation of sensory disturbance on balance and posture.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing (Writing)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Discipline Specific Competencies (Discipline Specific Competencies)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)

04. Describe the acute adjustments in the neural control of movement during fatigue and disease

Activities:
Face-to-face lectures and on-line content. Practicals: video analysis of walking, jogging and sprinting using motion analysis software.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)

05. Describe the neural adaptations to endurance training

Activities:
Face-to-face lectures and on-line content. Practicals: measurement of reaction time and investigation of the influence of fatigue on reaction time.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Writing (Writing)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Discipline Specific Competencies (Discipline Specific Competencies)

06. Describe the neural adaptations to strength training

Activities:
Face-to-face lectures and on-line content. Workshops: evaluation of research surrounding low back pain, inhibition of deep stabilising muscles and specific re-training. Practicals: acquisition and interpretation of EMG with specific emphasis on EMG and kinematic changes during skill learning. For example, EMG analysis to determine sequential timing of muscle systems in the body (eg. antagonist vs agonist and synergistic muscles).
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Discipline Specific Competencies (Discipline Specific Competencies)
Writing (Writing)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)

07. Apply appropriate movement outcome measures to assess performance, learning and automaticity of motor skills.

Activities:
Face-to-face lectures and on-line content. Practicals: video analysis of movement (walking, running, sprinting) will be performed using motion analysis software. For example, these techniques can be used to evaluate the influence of skill training and fatigue on movement control.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Discipline Specific Competencies (Discipline Specific Competencies)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Teamwork (Teamwork)
Writing (Writing)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)

08. Describe the changes in movement patterns and neural activity that accompany fatigue, aging, soft-tissue injury, motor disorders and motor deficits that accompany common disorders of the somatosensory system, basal ganglia, cerebellum, and motor cortex.

Activities:
Face-to-face lectures and on-line content. Workshops: case-based enquiries. Practicals: the influence of sensory disturbance on balance and motor performance will be evaluated using observation and discussion with people with motor and sensory disorders or videos of people with motor and sensory disorders.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Writing (Writing)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Bendigo, 2016, Semester 2, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment size50

Enrolment information Staffing resources are limited. The maximum amount of students is 50 (two groups of 25 for workshops and practicals) . As this is a compulsory subject for students enrolled in HZHEP, they will be given priority enrolment. Students from other Health Sciences courses may choose the subject as a first-year elective and enrolment will be capped at 50.

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorNivan Weerakkody

Class requirements

Lecture Week: 31 - 43
One 2.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via blended.

Practical Week: 31 - 43
One 2.0 hours practical per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
2 written Laboratory Reportsequivalent to 1000 words each50 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06
one two-hour theory examinationequivalent to 2000 words50 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08

Melbourne, 2016, Semester 2, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment size100

Enrolment information Staffing resources are limited. As this is a compulsory subject for students enrolled in HBES, they will be given priority enrolment. Students from other Health Sciences courses may choose the subject.

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorDawson Kidgell

Class requirements

Practical Week: 31 - 43
One 2.0 hours practical per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Lecture Week: 31 - 43
One 2.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via blended.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
2 written Laboratory Reportsequivalent to 1000 words each50 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06
one two-hour theory examinationequivalent to 2000 words50 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08