RISE AND FALL OF CIVILISATIONS

ARC2RFC

Not currently offered

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

Ancient societies have gone through cycles of development and decline in terms of the level of social complexity. In this subject students are introduced to theoretical and practical approaches in archaeology relating to understanding of social-political change. Discussion topics include the emergence of social inequality, acquisition and maintenance of power by elites, function of ritual and ideology in relation to social transformation, and variability of political economy associated with the development of social complexity. Special attention is placed on the current debate about cultural evolution - how and why civilisations emerged, progressed, and collapsed in different parts of the world

SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorSteven Falconer

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 2 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites 15 credit points of Archaeology subjects or Coordinator's approval

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjects ARC3RFC

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Ability to present an argument based on archeological data about the nature of social complexity

Activities:
Medium length essay with a bibliography, Seminar presentation on current theoretical debates in archaeology, 10-12 powerpoint slides, 10 minute duration
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Writing (Writing)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)

02. Building strong communication and effective interaction between individuals while assessing various archaeological data sets

Activities:
Work in seminar groups to focus on one civilisation as a case study to explore practical applications of the archaeological theories presented each week
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Speaking (Speaking)
Teamwork (Teamwork)

03. Develop a knowledge of the forms of social complexity that is based on an understanding of diversity and historical origins rather than value judgements

Activities:
Exposure through lectures, discussions and debates in class
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Ethical & Cultural Awareness (Ethical & Cultural Awareness)
Life-Long Learning (Life-Long Learning)
Speaking (Speaking)

04. Identify the kinds of archaeological evidence associated with different aspects of social complexity using case studies of ancient civilisations from around the world

Activities:
Exposure through lectures, discussions and debates in class; seminar presentation and major essay
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Speaking (Speaking)
Life-Long Learning (Life-Long Learning)
Writing (Writing)

05. Understand the constraints that archaeological data places on understanding state formation and collapse

Activities:
Consideration of case studies of civilisations around the world and the nature of the archaeological evidence about available, and the different theoretical explanations offered for change, through seminar discussion, assignments and the major essay
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Ethical & Cultural Awareness (Ethical & Cultural Awareness)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Speaking (Speaking)
Writing (Writing)

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