PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION

WEM2PEE

2015

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

This subject provides an overview of ecology and the genetics of populations with a focus on biodiversity and interactions. Topics include population ecology, types of competition, dynamics of simple competition systems, competition models and real systems, types of predation, dynamics of simple predator-prey systems, predator-prey models and real systems, decomposers, parasitism and mutualism, the maintenance and distribution of genetic variation, the measurement of inbreeding, and the impact of natural selection. Other topics include community ecology, abiotic and biotic determinants of community structure, food web stability and complexity, applied ecology principles and dynamics of biological control, application of island biogeography and dynamics of agricultural and managed forest ecosystems. Students will collect and present a taxonomic project including a group of organisms of their choice.

SchoolSchool of Life Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorSusan Lawler

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 2 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites BIO1AD or BIO1PS or BIO1EEB

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjects WEM2TAE, WEM2EPA, WEM2EGE, WEM2EPB

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Prescribed reading will be provided online, as hard copy or assigned in the subject textbook. Students are encouraged to question or contribute to lecture material and discussions and revision will highlight core topics.

Activities:
Prescribed reading will be provided online, as hard copy or assigned in the subject textbook. Students are encouraged to question or contribute to lecture material and discussions and revision will highlight core topics.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)

02. Compare and evaluate arguements where debate exists relating to environmental policies and practice.

Activities:
Students will participate in classroom tutorials and discussions based on written material provided. Evidence of having completed the required reading wil be assessed with quizzes before discussion.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)

03. Assemble appropriate information to critically analyse and develop arguments for or against claims concerning environmental issues.

Activities:
Write an essay on a ecological or envioronmental topic where consensus is lacking.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing (Writing)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)

04. Identify important ecological and genetic issues and examine their relevance in an Australian context.

Activities:
Lectures and discussions will provide examples of such issues and the essays will provide the opportunity for students to demonstrate their understanding.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)

05. Distinguish between and document the advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches to carrying out ecological research.

Activities:
Approaches will be outlined in lectures and advantages/disadvantages covered in discussions.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)

06. Assemble a collection of organisms using correct preservation techniques, identify and label them appropriately and assess their phylogenetic relationships.

Activities:
Students will be guided through the process during practicals and lectures. Students will apply their skills and understanding through creating the taxonomic collection with a related phylogeny and writing an essay.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline-specific GCs (Discipline-specific GCs)
Writing (Writing)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Albury-Wodonga, 2015, Semester 1, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorSusan Lawler

Class requirements

Laboratory Class Week: 10 - 22
One 3.0 hours laboratory class per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via face-to-face.

Lecture Week: 10 - 22
Two 1.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via face-to-face.

Tutorial Week: 10 - 22
One 1.0 hours tutorial per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via face-to-face.

Laboratory Class Week: 10 - 22
One 3.0 hours laboratory class per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Essay (1500 words) due mid semester20 03
Final exam-essay and short answer (2 hours)40 01, 04, 05
Mid-term exam (1 hour) short answer10 01, 04, 05
Project (taxonomic collection) (1000 words end of semester)20 06
Quizzes in practical classes, weekly.10 02