SKILL ACQUISITION

EXS3SKA

2015

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

Success in exercise and sport depends on your ability to develop a specific set of perpetual, cognitive and motor skills. This subject will expand your theoretical and practical understanding of motor performance and skill learning. In this subject you will explore the principles and apply the concepts of skill acquisition to a variety of real-world settings such as coaching, rehabilitation and everyday motor skill learning. In particular, this subject considers the role that different types of learning, practice, instruction and feedback have on the skill acquisition process. Throughout this subject, the implications of current research that has shaped our understanding of motor skill learning will be reviewed, in particular, evaluating the major characteristics of change that occur in human performance during the skill acquisition process.

SchoolLa Trobe Rural Health School

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorDawson Kidgell

Available to Study Abroad StudentsNo

Subject year levelYear Level 3 - UG

Exchange StudentsNo

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites Must pass EXS2MCL and must be enrolled in one of HZHEP - Bachelor of Health Sciences and Master of Exercise Physiology, or Bachelor of Exercise Science, or Bachelor of Exercise Science and Master of Exercise Physiology. All other students require Subject Coordinator's approval.

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsMotor control and learning.PreliminarySchmidt, R & Lee, T 20115TH EDN, HUMAN KINETICS, CHAMPAIGN IL.
ReadingsMotor learning and performance.PreliminarySchmidt, R & Wrisberg, C 20084TH EDN, HUMAN KINETICS, CHAMPAIGN IL.
ReadingsSkill acquisition in sport, research, theory and practice.PreliminaryHodges, N & Williams, M 2012ROUTLEDGE, NY.

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Explore the role of the brain and nervous system in movement control and perceptual, cognitive and motor skill learning.

Activities:
Lectures: principles of action potential and neural transmission; role of the central and peripheral nervous systems; anatomy of the brain; functional role of the cerebellum, basal ganglia and brain stem in movement control. Seminar tasks: evaluation of experimental research in relation to brain anatomy and function; identification of the major roles of the central and peripheral nervous systems.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Communication (Communication)
Speaking (Speaking)
Writing (Writing)

02. Critically evaluate the sensory contribution to skilled performance, motor control and movement accuracy and identify models of motor programming for movement production.

Activities:
Lectures: sources of sensory information; anatomy of the visual apparatus; role of the vestibular apparatus and proprioceptors in balance control; the role of peripheral and foveal vision in balance; motor program theory; closed-loop control systems; open-loop processes; principles of speed and accuracy; Fitt's Law; the linear speed-accuracy trade-off; the temporal speed-accuracy trade-off. Seminar tasks: group discussion on the major theories and laws for simple movements; identification of differences between open and closed-loop models to skill learning. Practical tasks: examine the effects of limiting vision on the ability to balance.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Speaking (Speaking)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Writing (Writing)

03. Critically assess different methods for facilitating, structuring and supplementing the learning experience, evaluating their impact on learning and describe the major characteristics of change that occur with skill learning.

Activities:
Lectures: types of learning (ie. visual, auditory); role of memory in skilled performance and learning; types of practice (ie. mass versus distributed, blocked versus random) and methods of instruction (ie. modelling, guidance) and impact on skill learning; decision-making; major characteristics of change during the learning of movement skills (ie. attentional processes, perceptual changes, cues for recall and recognition of movement); normative development of motor skills; developmental changes across the lifespan; strategies of novice and expert performers. Seminar tasks: evaluation of practical classes and analysis of results linking to current experimental research. Practical tasks: comparing types of learning, practice and instruction in the learning of different motor skills.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Writing (Writing)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Communication (Communication)

04. Compare and contrast individual differences with respect to learning motor abilities and demonstrate an ability to identify the perceptual, decision-making and motor responses required for a range of motor activities.

Activities:
Lectures: concept of individual differences; abilities and capabilities; taxonomies; prediction of individual differences. Seminar tasks: evaluation of the previous week's practical classes and analysis of the results linking it to current experiemental research in this field. Practical tasks: compare the ability of participants to anticipate certain tasks; comparison of individual reaction times across a range of different motor skills.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Speaking (Speaking)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Writing (Writing)

05. Critically evaluate different types of feedback and discuss their impact during the skill learning experience.

Activities:
Lectures: classification and definitions of feedback; augmented feedback and its effects on skill learning; types of feedback (ie. knowledge of performance and knowledge of results); when to present feedback; frequency of feedback provision. Seminar tasks: use experimental research to discuss the effectiveness of different types of feedback on the skill learning experience. Practical tasks: compare the effectiveness of feedback in the learning of a motor skill.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)
Writing (Writing)

06. Construct, perform and evaluate appropriate measurement methods to perform and report motor skill learning and demonstrate an ability to design training or practice sessions to maximise skill learning.

Activities:
Seminar tasks: analyse data collected during practical sessions and apply the appropriate calculations in order to report data correctly. Practical tasks: investigations into the effects of vision, learning, feedback, practice and instruction on the skill learning process; analysis of individual differences for tests of anticipation and reaction time.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Communication (Communication)
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)
Speaking (Speaking)

Subject options

Select to view your study options…

Start date between: and    Key dates

Bendigo, 2015, Semester 1, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment size125

Enrolment information Limited staffing resources. Tables applying quota. Once quota reached, further enrolments will be subject to approval by Subject Coordinator.

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorStephen Cousins

Class requirements

Laboratory Class
One 1.0 hours laboratory class per week and delivered via face-to-face.

Lecture
One 2.0 hours lecture per week and delivered via face-to-face.

Seminar
One 1.0 hours seminar per week and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
One 2-hour theory examination.50 01, 03, 05, 06
One group essay (750 words per student).30 01, 03, 04
One group poster presentation (10 minutes per student).20 01, 02, 03, 04

Melbourne, 2015, Semester 1, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorStephen Cousins

Class requirements

Laboratory Class
One 1.0 hours laboratory class per week and delivered via face-to-face.

Lecture
One 2.0 hours lecture per week and delivered via face-to-face.

Seminar
One 1.0 hours seminar per week and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
One 2-hour theory examination.50 01, 03, 05, 06
One group essay (750 words per student).30 01, 03, 04
One group poster presentation (10 minutes per student).20 01, 02, 03, 04