ANCIENT TECHNOLOGIES

ARC2ANT

2015

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

Stone tools and the debris from their manufacture make up the bulk of the Australian archaeological record and their analysis and interpretation touches on almost every aspect of archaeological theory and practice. A broad range of problems is investigated through the study of stone artefacts: questions about the social and economic strategies of past societies and about the patterns of interaction between them. Implementing these approaches is a daunting task without some practical knowledge about how to identify, describe and analyse stone artefacts and one of the aims of this subject is to show how this is done

SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorNicola Stern

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 2 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites 15 credit points of Archaeology subjects or Coordinator's approval

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjects ARC3ANT

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsA Record in Stone: The Study of Australia's Flaked Stone Artefacts.PrescribedHoldaway, S.J. & Stern, N.ABORIGINAL STUDIES PRESS, CANBERRA AND MUSEUM VICTORIA, MELBOURNE. 2004
ReadingsLithics: Macroscopic Approaches to Analysis.RecommendedAndrefsky, W.CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS, NEW YORK. SECOND EDITION. 2005

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Apply skills and knowledge in inquiry/research, critical thinking and creative problem solving to new interpretive frameworks as they are developed

Activities:
Foundations for achieving this goal are embedded in laboratory exercises, assignments and the final essay
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Life-Long Learning (Life-Long Learning)

02. Appraise different analytical and interpretive approaches and their application to specific data

Activities:
Research and write an essay that includes critical evaluation of the analytical and interpretive approaches applied to a specific context
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Creative Problem-solving (Creative Problem-solving)

03. Contribute to class discussions evaluating different approaches to the interpretation and analysis of artefacts

Activities:
Participation in the weekly discussions held during the laboratory sessions linking the attributes being identified on the artefacts to the information they can generate about past technology
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Speaking (Speaking)

04. Evaluate different interpretations of change in the stone artefact record by investigating the theoretical and methodological approaches employed and the data presented in support of those interpretations

Activities:
Short assignment involving the analysis of a knapped assemblages and a medium length essay requiring the evaluation of current interpretations of change in the Australian stone artefact record
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing (Writing)

05. Identify differences between different approaches to the study of Australian stone artefacts

Activities:
Research and write an essay in which specific archaeological evidence is used to support the argument presented
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research (Inquiry/ Research)

06. Identify the substantive differences between different approaches to the analysis and interpretation of artefact assemblages

Activities:
Research and write an essay that includes critical evaluation of different analytical and interpretive approaches
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Critical Thinking (Critical Thinking)

07. Work as a member of a team to acquire archaeological information

Activities:
During workshops discuss in groups the features of an artefact that led you to identify it
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Teamwork (Teamwork)

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Melbourne, 2015, Semester 1, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorNicola Stern

Class requirements

Laboratory Class Week: 10 - 22
One 2.0 hours laboratory class per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Lecture Week: 10 - 22
One 1.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Essay (1,800-word equivalent)40 03, 05
Knapping assignment (200-word equivalent)10 04, 05, 06
Laboratory exercises (1,800-word equivalent)40 03, 05
Practical exam (200-word equivalent)10 03, 04, 05, 06