Projects

Personalised MP3

Client: Southern Cross Care

Start year: 2011
End year: 2012

Related link: http://www.southern-cross.org.au/news/517

The aim of this project was to determine if and when and MP3 player is provided to informal caregivers of people with dementia, the use of the device by the person with dementia enables their caregivers to undertake activities that give them brief respite from the high level of vigilance often needed in caring for their family member, both at home and in public spaces. This project was conducted in collaboration with Southern Cross Care (Vic.) who funded the project. Findings from the study were launched in September 2013.

EN-ABLE

Client: Australian Department of Health & Ageing

Start year: 2011
End year: 2012

The EN-ABLE Project addressed the target area 'Behaviour Management' in residential aged/dementia care. It supported a key national health priority, 'Promoting and Maintaining Good Health' and the Department of Health and Ageing reform agenda 'Encouraging Best Practices in Residential Aged Care'. The aim of this project was to skill residential care staff to respond in person-cented, evidence-based ways to need-driven behaviours (NDBs), variously referred to as behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSDs) and Unmet Need Behaviours (UNBs) in the literature. The central project goal was to implement and evaluate the EN-ABLE education and training in residential aged/dementia care through an empowering staff support process.

Research into factors influencing residential aged care staff decision-making when a resident's health deteriorates

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Development of an evidence-based on-line resource package to improve staff-family relationships for people living with dementia in residential aged care.

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Snoezelen Therapy

Client: JO & JR Wicking Trust

Start year: 2009
End year: 2010

Snoezelen and other multi-sensory therapies provide stimuli to the primary senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell. Developed in the Netherlands as a leisure resource for children with learning disabilities in the 1970s the popularity of Snoezelen has spread and is now frequently used in fields as diverse as paediatrics, midwifery, mental health, special education and pain management. Traditionally Snoezelen is delivered in a dedicated room designed specifically for this purpose using a variety of lights, moving objects, music, aromas, and tactile objects.

Many Snoezelen environments now incorporate the use of 'high tech' fibre optics, bubble tubes, strobe lights, aroma steamers, image projectors and ceiling mounted mirror balls. Most recently, the sensory experience has been provided via a mobile cart transported to the individual's bedside or in the form of an outdoor Snoezelen garden. Anecdotally, the use of Snoezelen and multisensory therapies has become increasingly popular in residential aged-care facilities (RACFs) in Victoria, in particular for residents living with dementia who may exhibit behaviours that staff find challenging. These behaviours include wandering, restlessness and aggression. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of Snoezelen and other multi-sensory interventions in the management of dementia behaviours in Victorian RACFs, including the indications for use; the types of interventions used; staffing and physical requirements for the delivery of multisensory therapies; assessment; staff training, education and evaluation.

Assessment documentation in residential aged care: Do facilities consider the sexual health and sexual needs of residents?

Client: Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University Grant

Start year: 2010
End year: 2011

This research project seeks to obtain baseline data regarding whether or not residential aged care facilities in Victoria provide residents with rights regarding sexual expression and sexual health.

Constructive Staff/Family Relationships in Residential Aged Care

Client: Australian Department of Health & Ageing

Start year: 2009
End year: 2009

Related link: http://www.latrobe.edu.au/aipca/aipca-documents/Published-FinalReport-DOHA-Constructive-Staff-Family-Relationships-in-Residential-Aged-Care.pdf

There is a widely held belief that a positive relationship between residential aged care staff and the families of residents is likely to improve care delivery for the resident; however, there is little empirical evidence to support this claim. The development and maintenance of positive relationships between staff and families need to examine ways to support positive relationships. To date there has been no measure available to determine how well staff and family currently engage in this designed to improve the quality of relationships. This project developed two reliable tools to enable aged services to measure, evaluate and improve the quality of care they provide.

Encouraging Best Practice in Residential Aged Care (EBPRAC) Pain Management Project

Client: Australian Department of Health & Ageing

Start year: 2009
End year: 2009

The Encouraging Best Practice in Residential Aged Care (EBPRAC) Pain Management Project aimed to establish an effective and sustainable implementation strategy for pain assessment and management for the residential aged care setting. Funded by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, the project was led by the National Ageing Research Institute (NARI) in a multi-disciplinary partnership of six research organisations, and five residential aged care facilities, across Victoria, Western Australia and Queensland.

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SCORE (Strengthening Care Outcomes for Residents with Evidence)

Client: Department of Health Victoria

Start year: 2008
End year: 2009

Related link: http://www.health.vic.gov.au/agedcare/services/score.htm

The SCORE project aimed to enhance the care outcomes for people living in Public Sector Residential Aged Care Services through the implementation of standardised care processes (SCPs) based on the best available evidence, clinical judgement and resident choice. SCORE was a DHS funded project, the aim of which was to: identify areas of clinical risk in Victorian PSRACS, develop evidence-based standardised care processes (SCPs) in ten of these identified clinical risk areas, pilot these ten SCPs in six Victorian PSRACS, evaluate the pilot and consider broader statewide implementation of SCORE. With Lincoln.

Comprehensive Health Assessment of the Older Person 2.

Client: Department of Health Victoria

Start year: 2012
End year: 2013

A previous project Strengthening Care Outcomes for Residents with Evidence (SCORE) funded by the Victorian Department of Health (Aged Care Branch) identified the need for public sector residential aged care services (PSRACS) staff to enhance their knowledge and skills in comprehensive health assessment (CHA) of the older person. The overall aim of this project was to address that gap and provide CHA of the older person knowledge and skills training to the PSRACS workforce, specifically the professional health workforce in rural locations.

The learning resources developed included: a comprehensive education and training folder comprising eight modules, namely

  1. Clinical reasoning and general assessment,
  2. Communication of assessment findings and ethical, legal and professional ramifications,
  3. Psychosocial assessment,
  4. Nutrition, metabolism and elimination,
  5. Assessment of the cardiovascular system,
  6. Respiratory assessment,
  7. Musculoskeletal assessment
  8. Assessment of cognition and perception; pre and post workshop activities; simulation mannequins and other assessment equipment; and licences for participants to use the Jarvis Physical Examination and Health Assessment DVD.
  9. The training delivered was interactive and included both the learning of assessment skills and the related theory in comprehensive health assessment. ACEBAC staff and experienced nurse educators delivered the training.

Pain in older adults with dementia: Development of a tool to meaure nursing staff knowledge and attitudes.

Client: Faculty of Health Sciences, La Trobe University Grant

Start year: 2010
End year: 2011

This project constructed and evaluated a psychometrically sound tool to measure nursing staff knowledge and attitudes regarding pain in older adults (including adults with dementia) for use in the residential aged care setting. Access to pain relief is basic human right. The tool developed will be beneficial in identifying nursing staff knowledge deficits and negative attitudes that may be preventing staff from recognising pain in the older adults they care for, and preventing the older adult from receiving appropriate care, pain relief, and pain management. These areas of deficit can then be targeted in education programs for aged care staff and be used to inform practice so that older people (including older people with dementia) can access the care to which they are entitled.