Event Recordings

Browse our catalogue of event recordings, including our monthly Research and Practice Seminars, research launches, guest lectures and webinars.


Report launch: Responsive Pandemic Practice

Launch of Responsive pandemic practice: LGBTIQ+ family violence service innovation in Victoria during COVID-19, co-hosted by the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS) at La Trobe University and Thorne Harbour Health, partnering with Switchboard and funded by Family Safety Victoria.

Hear from LGBTIQ+ practitioners and organisations as they reflect on the lessons learned and how they transformed family violence service delivery during COVID-19 lockdowns. The report details the research and findings conducted by ARCSHS into LGBTIQ+ organisations family violence service provision during COVID-19, highlighting the innovative options developed and the adaptability and flexibility of organisations to pivot services while keeping clients at the centre of the work.

The launch event includes remarks from Eleri Butler, CEO Family Safety Victoria; Carolyn Gillespie, Director of Services Thorne Harbour Health; Todd Fernando, Victorian Commissioner for LGBTIQ Communities, and an overview of the key research findings from lead researcher Dr Shane Worrell. Hear from a panel of family violence practitioners from Switchboard and Thorne Harbour Health as they discuss their experiences and learnings from this time.

Find out more about the project and download the Responsive Pandemic Practice Report and Practice Guide


Post-migration health and wellbeing of Southeast Asian queer migrants

In the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society's November Research and Practice Seminar, Western Sydney University's Dr Quah Ee Ling explores the post-migration health and wellbeing of Southeast Asian queer migrants, using transnational and intersectional feminist approaches.


Launch: Opening Doors: Ensuring LGBTIQ-inclusive family, domestic and sexual violence services

Held on October 13, the launch of the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society's 'Opening Doors: Ensuring LGBTIQ-inclusive family, domestic and sexual violence services' research report and accompanying resources. Speakers include acting ARCSHS Director Associate Professor Adam Bourne, The Hon Amanda Rishworth MP, Commonwealth Minister for Social Services, Lead investigator Dr Stephanie Lusby, Acting Rainbow Health Australia Co-Director Jackson Fairchild, Jex Burgess, lived experience expert, Fahad Jawaid, Thorne Harbour Health, Sue Webeck, Domestic Violence Crisis Service ACT and Eloise Layard, ACON

Find out more about the project and download the Opening Doors report

Links to cited resources:


Stigma and hepatitis C

Click through to watch Kate Seear's talk at the AIVL Australian Stigma Conference 2022 from 6:33:30


Can there be a feminist politics of drinking? Alcohol harms and home drinking experiments

In the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society's September Research and Practice Seminar, ANU's Professor Helen Keane explores women's drinking in terms of narcofeminist acts of resistance, harms, empowerment, the transformative role of drugs in queer culture and a trillion-dollar global industry.


Human Rights Education on sexual & gender identity in Australian schools, post-marriage equality

In the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society's August Research and Practice Seminar, Monash University's Professor Paula Gerber examines the effect of the marriage equality plebiscite's 'No' campaign on human rights education on sexual orientation and gender identity, as well as more broadly, in Australian schools.


Family is complicated: Supporting families and people living with HIV, hepatitis C, or hepatitis B

In the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society's July Research and Practice Seminar, in conjunction with World Hepatitis Day 2022, UNSW's Anthony KJ Smith, Christy Newman and Kerryn Drysdale explore the ways that family complexity and family inclusion affects people living with blood-borne virus in terms of stigma, education, care and broader life.


Launch: W3 Framework Guide and website

Without meaningful input from peers, public health responses fail to meet the needs of our most marginalised and vulnerable communities. Despite this, peer-led organisations and programs often find it hard to measure and show the full impact and value of their work. Since 2013, The W3 Project at the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society at La Trobe University has been collaborating with peer and community organisations to improve our understanding of the role and impact of peer-led responses within Australia’s public health response to HIV and hepatitis C. We developed the W3 Framework, which can help peer responses better understand, evaluate, and improve their work.

The newly published W3 Framework website and guides showcase everything we’ve learned during almost 10 years of research – including providing guidance and tools to help peer-led organisations and programs evaluate their own work more effectively. This launch of the website and guide features W3 Project lead investigator Associate Professor Graham Brown and project officer Petrina Hilton, with guest speakers from some of our partner organisations, sharing their own thoughts about the experiences collaborating in this research, how using the W3 Framework has helped them in their own work, and how they think the W3 Framework will continue to help the peer-led blood-borne virus sector into the future.


Swedish stakeholder narratives about alcohol policy at football stadiums

In the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society's June Research and Practice Seminar, Professor Mats Ekendahl discusses how Swedish alcohol policy stakeholders' constructions of 'truth' about alcohol consumption affect public campaigns around drinking at Swedish sports events.


'Uninhibited Play': the political and pragmatic dimensions of intoxication within queer cultures

In the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society's May Research and Practice Seminar, Professor Kane Race, Professor of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney, argues that disinhibition provides a better frame for grasping the significance of the chemical practices of sex and gender minorities than competing concepts such as 'minority stress'.


Who is entitled to healthcare? Basic care as exceptional care for LGBTIQA+ People with Disability

In the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society's April Research and Practice Seminar, Dr J. R. Latham, Alfred Deakin Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Deakin University, and Honorary Fellow in Cultural Studies at The University of Melbourne, Australia, discusses the results of a study examining the healthcare and community service experiences of LGBTIQA+ people with disability.


Indigenous Australian experiences of sex work

In the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society's February Research and Practice Seminar, Associate Professor Corinne Sullivan of Western Sydney University discusses a study examining the lived experiences of Indigenous Australian sex workers.


Exploring emerging modes of governance and care in Safer Opioid Supply (SOS) Programs

In the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society's February Research and Practice Seminar, Associate Professor Adrian Guta of the University of Windsor in Ontario, Canada, examines Canadian "safer opioid supply" (SOS) programs that were scaled up in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Book launch: Remaking HIV Prevention in the 21st Century: The promise of TasP, U=U and PrEP

To coincide with World AIDS Day 2021, ARCSHS hosted an online webinar launching the book Remaking HIV prevention in the 21st century: The promise of TasP, U=U and PrEP. This collection was edited by Dr Sarah Bernays, Associate Professor Adam Bourne, Professor Susan Kippax, Professor Peter Aggleton and Professor Richard Parker. Comprising 21 chapters from authors living and working on six continents, this edited collection recognises and examines the central role that social science has played, and continues to play, in the global HIV pandemic.


Understanding the impediments to uptake and diffusion of take home naloxone in Australia

The term ‘take-home naloxone’ refers to a variety of life-saving initiatives in which a medication (naloxone) is made available to non-medically trained people for administration to others experiencing an opioid overdose. Despite a range of efforts to expand these initiatives over the last eight years, the uptake of take-home naloxone in Australia remains inconsistent. This seminar launches the final report of an Australian Research Council-funded qualitative study investigating impediments to the uptake of take-home naloxone in Australia.


Men In Place: (Trans)Masculinities, Race, and Space

In the ARCSHS November Research & Practice Seminar, held on November 17 2021, Associate Professor Miriam J. Abelson of Portland State University discusses trans masculine perspectives of contemporary U.S. masculinities, and their potentials for challenging and reinforcing broader hierarchies of race, sexuality, and gender.


Understanding experiences of telehealth care for Hep C treatment in Australia


Imagining and remaking PrEP after COVID 19: An evidence making intervention perspective

How has COVID-19 caused users of PrEP to pause, stop or change their patterns of use, and what does this suggest for successful and sustained PrEP implementation? View The October 2021 ARCSHS Research and Practice Seminar with UNSW Sydney's Professor Martin Holt.


Challenging methodological orthodoxies in researching domestic abuse

In the ARCSHS September Research & Practice Seminar, held on 15 September 2021, Professor Catherine Donovan of the University of Durham critiques the use of 'domestic violence crime' as a measure of domestic violence in the UK - i.e. behaviours that meet the threshold of a criminal offence, such as assault or criminal damage - partly because they render invisible many of the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or trans and non-binary gender people.


Automating safety and consent in digital dating culture: Negotiations of safety, risk and wellbeing

In the ARCSHS August Research & Practice Seminar, held on August 18 2021, Professor Kath Albury of Swinburne University reflects on the measures users of dating apps actually take to keep themselves safe, as compared to the public and media narratives about online safety.


Addressing alcohol and other drug related stigma in Australia: Where to next

Department of Psychology and Counselling Colloquium at La Trobe University

Alcohol and other drug-related stigma is a persistent and ubiquitous problem that arises in a wide range of settings. There is now a growing recognition of the importance of addressing such stigma. In this presentation, Associate Professor Kate Seear argues that to address stigma, we must understand how it is structured and enabled.


Pride in Prevention Messaging Guide Launch

Rainbow Health Victoria is proud to launch the new resource 'Pride in Prevention Messaging Guide: A guide to support communications and engagement in primary prevention of family violence experienced by LGBTIQ communities'.


Pyrocene Babies: Pregnancy, birth & parenting newborns during the bushfires & the COVID-19 pandemic

A Research & Practice Seminar from ANU's Professor Celia Roberts explores regnancy, birth and parenting newborns during the Australian bushfires and COVID-19 pandemic.


New Struggles Over Hegemony in the Governance of HIV

This seminar from University of California's Dr Stephen Molldrem explores new struggles over hegemony in the governance of HIV, and explores viewpoints from critics of molecular HIV surveillance in US HIV civil society.


Exploring contemporary butch lesbian identity

Dr Finn Mackay of the University of the West of England explores stability and divisions in the lesbian identity category of 'butch'.


Chemsex cultures

In this Research & Practice Seminar, the University of Exeter's Dr João Florêncio explores the framing chemsex as a practice of subcultural reproduction that connects contemporary gay and bisexual men across generations, ensuring the survival of their cultures and subjectivities, and focuses on chemsex’s potential as a life-affirming cultural practice.


Understanding the impediments to uptake and diffusion of take home naloxone in Australia

The term ‘take-home naloxone’ refers to a variety of life-saving initiatives in which a medication (naloxone) is made available to non-medically trained people for administration to others experiencing an opioid overdose. Despite a range of efforts to expand these initiatives over the last eight years, the uptake of take-home naloxone in Australia remains inconsistent. This seminar launches the final report of an Australian Research Council-funded qualitative study investigating impediments to the uptake of take-home naloxone in Australia.


Launch: Rainbow Tick: A framework for LGBTIQ inclusion

Rainbow Health Victoria is proud to have launched* our new resource Rainbow Tick: a framework for LGBTIQ inclusion. This updated guide presents the Rainbow Tick Standards as a set of key organising principles for any organisation developing a plan for improving LGBTIQ inclusion, while also supporting organisations on their journey to formal accreditation.


Launch of Writing Themselves In 4: The health and wellbeing of LGBTQA+ young people in Australia

Writing Themselves In 4 is Australia’s largest ever study on the health and wellbeing of LGBTQA+ young people aged 14-21. The national report contains vital information about the health and wellbeing of more than 6,000 LGBTQA+ young people, as well as findings relating to their experiences at school, homelessness, community connection and a range of other issues. The data will help to inform all those working to improve the lives of LGBTQA+ young people in Australia.