About the school

La Trobe Law School offers practical, innovative and accessible programs that equip students to graduate ready to practise law in Australia.

Our teaching

With our practical, skills-based approach to legal education students benefit from hands-on clinical based placements, industry networking events and classes with innovative practising scholars at the cutting-edge of developments in law.

Offering flexibility through a diverse range of elective units, students are able to tailor their study to match their career aspirations. Our law degree leverages real-world practical experience, with clinical placements, international exchange and clerkship opportunities.

We pride ourselves on promoting versatility, discipline-spanning skills and employability amongst our student cohort. We have produced a generation of successful graduates who have gone on to work in roles ranging from:

  • Senior Counsel and Queen’s Counsel, Magistrates and Judges, senior partners of law firms of every size
  • Senior government officials, federal and state politicians
  • Careers in business, taxation and other fields through our wide-ranging double degree programs.

Hear more from two our successful graduates below:

Our Research

The La Trobe Law School has a proud tradition of high impact socio-legal or “law and society” research, with significant practical application. Law and society research aims to understand legal concepts, institutions and practices in their social, historical, cultural, political and economic contexts. In recent years, the Law School has continued to build on its tradition of law and society research, but has branched out into some new and exciting areas of legal scholarship.

Law School researchers are tackling some of the most challenging issues of the 21st century, including the relationship between law and technology, the regulation of health technologies and the human body, and the relationship between the state and its citizens. Staff within the School partner with a range of industry and government bodies, including the Victorian Assisted Reproductive Treatment Authority, the Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, and the Donor Tissue Bank of Victoria. Researchers have influenced law reform in Australia and overseas, participated in test case litigation, served as expert witnesses in superior court cases, and engaged regularly with the media.