Project-based graduate research scholarships

We offer a range of doctoral scholarships available for specific research projects as part of our mid-year scholarship round. Successful applicants will receive a scholarship that can help with fee-relief, living costs, and more. Stipend value $32,500 per annum (full-time).

Applications for project based scholarships are now open

Applications close: 31 July 2022.

How to apply

  • If you want to apply for a graduate research scholarship to undertake one of these projects, please make sure to:

    • review details on how to apply for PhD candidature
    • select a project from the available projects listed below
    • check the project requirements for eligibility and any additional special conditions
    • contact the nominated contact person for your preferred project via email to express your interest and obtain their in-principle agreement for you to apply
    • complete your application for admission into La Trobe’s PhD program
    • complete a Research Statement Form for your nominated project (only one project can be nominated) and attach this to your application
    • a research proposal is not required unless specifically requested as a special condition
  • Domestic applicants, submit your application to the La Trobe Graduate Research School, admissions.grs@latrobe.edu.au

    International applicants, submit your application via the International Online Application System

  • Complete the Research Statement Form. Your application cannot be accepted without the completed form and without in-principle agreement for you to apply from the nominated contact of the research project.

  • If you have any further questions about the application process, please contact admissions.grs@latrobe.edu.au

Available projects

La Trobe Business School

Description

This project aims to identify organisational factors that facilitate long-term employment for individuals on the autism spectrum. The PhD project relates to a 3-year research project on autism employment, funded by the Australian Research Council and in collaboration with industry partners Autism Spectrum Australia (Aspect) and DXC Technology. The larger ARC project examines the links between sustainable employment and well-being of autistic adults. Survey and interview data will be collected in partner organisations after implementing two training programs for autistic staff and colleagues. The PhD project will further examine the role of supervisors, leadership, team dynamics, and/or organisational culture, in developing a sustainable autism employment program. The PhD candidate will be located in the La Trobe Business School with co-supervision from the Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre (OTARC).

Supervisor

Dr Jennifer Spoor and Dr Simon Bury

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Individuals who self-identify as autistic or on the autism spectrum are strongly encouraged to apply. Disclosure is not required.

More information

For more information, please contact Jennifer Spoor

La Trobe Rural Health School

Description

These scholarships will be awarded to outstanding applicants who are keen to undertake interdisciplinary biomedical research in a collaborative and innovative laboratory. Projects will be adapted to the right applicant’s area of interest and expertise, with a common goal of using advanced microscopy to visualize and better understand the molecular pathways that underly disease.

As an applicant you should have strong undergraduate training in at least one area of science or biomedicine and, importantly, a desire to branch out into other disciplines. Acceptable undergraduate majors include molecular/cell biology, chemistry, physics, computer science, genetics, biochemistry, or similar. Available research projects include development of new fluorescence microscopy techniques and analyses for super-resolution imaging; imaging of DNA damage and repair in cancer and neurodegenerative models; imaging of genetic engineering events; single molecule in vitro studies of DNA-protein interactions; and characterization of new fluorophores.

Supervisor

Dr Donna Whelan

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents.

More information

For more information, please contact Donna Whelan

School of Agriculture, Biomedicine and Environment

Description

Australia has a diverse and charismatic orchid flora, characterised by numerous species with deceptive pollination strategies. Unfortunately, many of our orchid species are now highly endangered, necessitating intensive conservation efforts such as reintroductions. Using the focal genus of Caladenia, widely known for its numerous sexually deceptive species, we are offering three potential PhD topics that would provide information toward the objective of improved reintroduction success:

(i) Increasing recruitment and reducing mortality to improve conservation translocations of threatened orchids.

(ii) Environmental vs phenotypic factors affecting reproductive success in endangered orchids.

(iii) Species delimitation, distribution, and ecology of orchid-pollinating thynnine wasps.

Supervisor

Dr Ryan Phillips, Professor Rod Peakall (The Australian National University), Dr Noushka Reiter (Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria)

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Applicants will need:

  • a driver’s license
  • a willingness to undertake extensive periods of fieldwork if needed
  • a willingness to learn appropriate statistical and/or laboratory methods

More information

For more information, please contact Ryan Phillips

Description

Australian freshwater turtles are declining, and nest destruction by invasive foxes appears to be one of the major drivers. Traditional lethal fox controls like 1080 baiting and shooting have had limited effectiveness. Instead of controlling foxes, this project aims to test the effectiveness of several methods of protecting turtle nests from foxes. The project will be field-based in south-eastern Australia and include turtle population surveys, mark-recapture, and radiotelemetry, as well as aquatic ecosystem monitoring. It will also involve community engagement with on-ground stakeholders and managers who manage the study sites and help find and protect turtle nests. In addition to the management outcomes, the project is an excellent opportunity to develop additional research on hatchling turtle ecology, which is relatively unknown. The successful candidate will work with a team of internationally-recognised turtle ecologists at La Trobe, Western Sydney University, University of New England, and The University of Sydney.

Supervisor

Dr James Van Dyke, Associate Professor Ricky Spencer (Western Sydney University), Dr Deborah Bower (University of New England)

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

The project is based at the Albury-Wodonga campus of La Trobe and has a heavy focus on fieldwork in nearby regional areas, so preference will be given to applicants able to be based in the Albury-Wodonga area for the duration of the project. A driver's license and willingness to undertake intensive fieldwork is required. A background in aquatic ecology, conservation, and/or vertebrate biology is preferred. Indigenous applicants are encouraged to apply.

More information

For more information, please contact James Van Dyke

Description

This project aims to determine the mechanisms by which plant genomes are regulated during seed germination. The genomes of cells in mature, inactive seeds are repressed, but later must be rapidly reactivated to allow the gene expression that drives early seedling growth and development. This project will study proteins that turn genes on and off, and how these interact with the structure of DNA, in order to understand how spatial and temporal patterns of gene expression are controlled. It will advance our understanding of genome regulatory programs controlling germination and growth, and how they vary between Arabidopsis and barley. The research will involve wet lab research (transcriptomics, ChIP-seq, cloning, microscopy, phenotype analysis) and bioinformatic analyses of data. There may be opportunities for single cell or spatial transcriptomics. Overall, the project can improve our ability to manipulate seed behaviour which would benefit growers and producers.

Supervisor

Dr Mathew Lewsey

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Applicants should have knowledge of either plant genetics or bioinformatics desirable.

More information

For more information, please contact Mathew Lewsey

Description

This project aims to synthesize multi-functional chemical probes to identify proteins that undergo unfolding or specific modifications in complex cellular environment on a large scale. These probes will be further applied in neurodegenerative disease models for pathological mechanism study and for potential disease diagnosis. The expected outcome is to deliver new methodology for a comprehensive understanding of the correlation between cellular quality control machinery, stress responses and cell function. This should provide significant benefits, including contributing to fundamental knowledge on the molecular causes of neurodegenerative diseases.

Supervisor

Dr Yuning Hong

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Applicant should have training on design and synthesis of organic compounds; knowledge and experience on molecular and cell biology are desirable; experience on mass spectrometry proteomics is highly desirable.

More information

For more information, please contact Yuning Hong

Description

This project is part of a collaborative partnership comprising the newly-established Max Planck Queensland Centre for the Materials Science of Extracellular Matrices, with investigators from La Trobe University, Queensland University of Technology, City University of Hong Kong and various laboratories in Germany. This La Trobe-based project will investigate the biophysical, environmental and regenerative adaptations of shark cartilage in a range of species from shallow water to deep-sea. Using a range of techniques (including bioimaging (µCT), histology, immunohistochemistry, and regenerative medicine) the endoskeleton will be examined under natural conditions and following trauma. Cell proliferation and survival, and the remodelling of extracellular matrices (ECM) will be examined in the context of pressure-induced architectural-morphing of cartilaginous tissues and how this can influence the ECM’s performance characteristics and ultimately its functionality. The project will monitor the regeneration of damaged tissue to assess healing processes of shark cartilage and surrounding perichondrium under different environmental conditions.

Supervisor

Professor Shaun Collin

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents.

Special conditions

Applicants should be enthusiastic and highly motivated to undertake further study at an advanced level with a keen interest in the research themes of the Neuroecology Group; be able to demonstrate strong academic performance in subjects relevant to anatomy, sensory ecology, comparative physiology, and materials science and have a strong desire to learn new and complex analytical techniques; have strong written and communication skills, with the ability to work independently and in a team-oriented context.

More information

For more information, please contact Shaun Collin

School of Cancer Medicine (Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute)

Description

The Mucosal Immunology and Cancer Laboratory focuses on identifying new immune targets that can be explored to develop novel therapeutics to treat bowel cancer. We study heterogeneous populations of T cells, known as intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) that are unique to the gastrointestinal tract. Our preliminary studies show that one population of IELs, known as gamma delta T cells, play a protective role in preventing development and progression of bowel cancer. We are working closely with the Tumour Immunology Laboratory that shares an interest in therapeutically exploiting gamma-delta T cell subsets in multiple cancer types. In this project we will collaboratively study a range of surface receptors and cell-cell crosstalk molecules predicted to modify the function of gamma delta T cells and their ability to engage other immune cell subsets and prevent cancer growth and metastasis. We will study the role of these molecules in gamma delta T cell function, in disease models and patient samples. We will use various techniques including flow cytometry, immunofluorescent microscopy and single cell RNA sequencing. We will determine if gamma delta T cell surface receptor expression can be exploited therapeutically to limit bowel cancer progression.

Supervisor

Dr Lisa Mielke

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Domestic students or International students completed or currently completing Undergraduate studies (Hons or Master) only, students must firstly make contact via students@onjcri.org.au for further details and to provide transcript of results.

More information

For more information, please contact students@onjcri.org.au

Description

It is evident that disseminated tumour cells (DTC) can remain in a clinically undetectable dormant state for years before causing a relapse. Since many types of chemotherapy rely on disrupting cell division, tumour cells in a dormant state are resistant to such therapies. To prevent recurrences and reduce breast cancer deaths, we need therapies that can either minimise release from dormancy or completely eradicate dormant cells. Indirect evidence for the existence of residual disease in patients comes from detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) or cell-free tumour DNA in blood samples. The difficulty of directly detecting and analysing residual disease in patients, in combination with the challenges of modelling dormancy in the laboratory has resulted in only fragmented knowledge of the establishment of DTCs in distant organs and their outgrowth into metastases. The aim of this project is to use our preclinical models of breast cancer dormancy to image and isolate cells in the dormant cell niche in bone and lung and to generate transcriptomic profiles of both tumour cells and the surrounding host cells. With this knowledge, we will assess the efficacy of therapies designed to maintain tumour dormancy or target a dormancy-specific vulnerability to eradicate these cells. We will use mouse-based breast cancer models that naturally display dormancy to image and investigate the tumour cell niche in mice using confocal and multiphoton microscopy. Tumour cells will be recovered for transcriptomic profiling as a basis for testing different therapies designed to either maintain dormancy of disseminated tumour cells or to specifically target dormant cells.

Supervisor

Professor Robin Anderson and Professor Sarah Ellis

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Domestic students or International students completed or currently completing Undergraduate studies (Hons or Master) only, students must firstly make contact via students@onjcri.org.au for further details and to provide transcript of results.

More information

For more information, please contact students@onjcri.org.au

Description

Immunotherapy has revolutionized the treatment of cancer, with checkpoint blockade therapy showing remarkable efficacy in several cancer subtypes, particularly melanoma. Despite this success, the majority of patients do not respond, for reasons that are not well defined, or acquire resistance after treatment. Furthermore, immunotherapies have proven to be relatively ineffective against some cancer types, including colorectal cancer.  Thus, there is an unmet need to unveil novel approaches to boost the response rate and prolong the extent of the benefit in colorectal cancers­­­, among other cancer types. Similarly, despite the success of adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) in the context of haematological malignancies, response rates against solid cancers is poor, likely due to tumor-associated immunosuppression and subsequent T cell dysfunction/exhaustion. Indeed, it is becoming clear that the failure of T cells to elicit a successful and long-term anti-tumor immune response is controlled by transcriptional, epigenetic and post-translational modifications, however, our current understanding of the molecules involved in these processes is poorly understood. Thus, there is urgent need for a systematic and high-throughput approach to identify novel immunotherapy targets in this regard.

Supervisor

Dr Conor Kearney

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

More information

For more information, please contact students@onjcri.org.au

Description

This project will use a high throughput screening approach involving cutting-edge technology including in vitro and in vivo CRISPR/Cas9 genetic screens, the development of novel, high throughput drug screening platforms and single-cell sequencing technology to identify novel targets to improve T-cell mediated anti-tumor immunity in colorectal cancer.  Some experience in molecular biology techniques,  computational biology and/or experimentation involving mice would be beneficial.

Supervisor

Dr Conor Kearney

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

More information

For more information, please contact students@onjcri.org.au

Description

The adaptive immune response is coordinated by a complex network of two cell lineages, T and B lymphocytes, generated from hematopoietic stem cells through multiple progenitor stages. Lymphopoiesis is the process of lymphocytes differentiation, which is controlled by harmonised transcription of thousands of genes through a complex Gene Regulatory Network (GRN), developing a high degree of phenotypic and functional plasticity in immune cells. Although many genes have been discovered to play a role in an adaptive immune response, the GRN underpinning this important process is poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how the GRN regulating immune responses is disrupted in cancers such as breast cancer. Over the last decade, advancements in genomics technologies and generating large amounts of omics data have shown a great promise in dissecting the complexity of lymphopoiesis. In parallel, there has been a growth of online databases, computational methodologies, and tools to explore multimodal data sets and integrate these multi-omics data acquisition to infer the underlying GRN. This study will utilise both public and in-house omics data, including RNA sequencing data, transcription factor chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) data and assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with sequencing (ATAC-seq) data, to construct GRNs to unveil the molecular mechanisms underlying differentiation of B and T cells. To construct GRNs, we will start by searching gene that co-express with major transcription factors involved in lymphopoiesis regulation. The interaction between these transcription factors and their co-expressed genes will be validated by ChIP-seq data. The association between transcription factors and chromatin accessibility will be tested by ATAC-seq data. The constructed GRNs will expand our understanding of underlying signalling and transcriptional regulation in lymphopoiesis. We will then investigate how the expression profile of GRN is altered in breast cancer and understand the differences in expression profile changes in primary and metastatic breast cancer. We will also explore the possibility of using GRN as a tool to predict the prognosis of breast cancer patients.

Supervisor

Professor Wei Shi and Professor Axel Kallies

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

More information

For more information, please contact students@onjcri.org.au

Description

The immune system plays a key role in recognising and eliminating tumours. Tumour cells however have evolved to employ multiple mechanisms to evade immune attack. Given their high energetic demand, tumour cells rapidly and efficiently use energy sources such as glucose from the tumour microenvironment (TME) making it unavailable for immune cells. Glucose catabolism by tumour cells also leads to the accumulation of intermediates such as lactic acid, which makes the TME hostile for immune cells. Tumour killing immune cells become dysfunctional in a lactic acid rich TME and fail to respond to immune checkpoint blockade therapy. Tumour cells are widely believed to rely on glycolysis for ATP production. However, glucose is the sole energy input for this metabolic pathway. Kreb’s or TCA cycle on the other hand can utilise glutamine, fatty acids and proteins as energy source to produce ATP to power the growth of tumour cells. We propose to perturb TCA cycle to make tumours fragile and susceptible to immunotherapy. To this end, we will ablate succinate dehydrogense (SDH) enzyme in murine colon tumours using CRISPR technology. This enzyme catalyses the conversion of fumarate to succinate and ablation of SDH will lead to the accumulation of succinate within tumour cells as well as the TME. Broadly, we will investigate how the metabolite succinate directly impacts tumour growth and the influence of succinate on immune cells in the TME. Succinate is known to induce ROS and promote angiogenesis. While counterintuitive, we believe angiogenesis will facilitate recruitment of immune cells to the TME. To unequivocally understand the impact of succinate on immune cells, in particular T cells, will employ SUCNR1 (succinate receptor) deficient mouse models. Furthermore, we will combine SDH inhibition with immune checkpoint blockade to assess the therapeutic benefits of succinate on cancer immunotherapy.This project will utilize cutting-edge molecular techniques such as CRISPR, RNAseq and ATACseq, multi-parameter flow cytometry, Immunohistochemistry and novel transgenic mouse models.

Supervisor

Dr Ajith Vasanthakumar and Professor John Mariadason

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Basic training in immunology or cancer biology (Honours or Masters minimum) will be required.

More information

For more information, please contact students@onjcri.org.au

School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

Description

The aim of the project is to contribute to resolving of (ideally, to resolve in full) the conjecture that a compact Finsler manifold with parallel, non-positive flag curvature is Berwald. The project will start with the study of known results and techniques and with understanding the low-dimensional cases.

Supervisor

Dr Yuri Nikolayevsky and Professor Vladimir Matveev (University of Jena, Germany)

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Strong background in Differential Geometry, including familiarity with Riemannian and (desirably) Finsler Geometry, and some familiarity with Dynamical Systems.

More information

For more information, please contact Yuri Nikolayevsky

Description

The project aims to address important problems in the theory and statistics of stochastic processes and develop new methodology for their applications. This project expects to generate new knowledge about processes  on multidimensional spaces and surfaces that are used in spatio-temporal data modelling. Main anticipated outcomes include:

  • developing approximation schemes for new complex data and investigating their accuracy and reliability;
  • studying properties of nonlinear statistics and transformations of these data;
  • providing new tools to investigate complex real data, in particular, in cosmology and embryology.

The results should provide significant benefits for optimal modelling and analysis of high resolution big data.

Supervisor

Dr Andriy Olenko and Emeritus Professor Philip Broadbridge, Professor A. Ayache (external)

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Applicants should have a background in probability, statistics or closely related fields.

More information

For more information, please contact Andriy Olenko

Description

This ARC discovery PhD project will explore the limits of sensitivity of label-free cellular imaging using advanced microscopy and nanotechnology tools as well as a range of correlative biochemical characterisation techniques. By exploring the complex near-field interactions of cells with light this project will investigate the specific optical properties of cells in order to develop a fundamental understanding of the sub-cellular differences between healthy and diseased cellular states. This project will afford the opportunity to be part of a large and productive multidisciplinary collaboration, work at multiple research institutions across Melbourne, and contribute to a number of industry-directed research projects. We anticipate that this project will afford excellent opportunities to pursue a career either in research or industry and would suit anyone with a strong interest in optical microscopy or cell biology.

Supervisor

Professor Brian Abbey and Associate Professor Belinda Parker (Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre)

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

We will consider applicants from either the Physical or Biological sciences. Strong laboratory and developed experimental skills are desirable.

More information

For more information, please contact Brian Abbey

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Description

This scholarship offers the opportunity be involved in an ARC-funded project that will produce a unique Routledge-commissioned, four-volume collection of rare, inaccessible and key published or archival primary sources. The collection will be accessible to academic and general audiences, including Indigenous communities. It will educate non-Indigenous Australians about our settler past and also inform Indigenous people and communities, empowering them with knowledge about past policies, activism and events.  It will use methodologies that break new ground in the practice of collecting and reproducing documents. The project is co-led by Associate Professor Kat Ellinghaus (La Trobe), Professor Barry Judd (University of Melbourne) and Emeritus Professor Richard Broome (La Trobe).

This scholarship offers a postgraduate student the exciting opportunity to work with this team on a project of their own design, which broadly focuses on a particular document, set of records or archive and making connections with communities described therein. We also welcome applicants to suggest their own area of focus provided it falls within the parameters of the project.

Supervisor

Dr Katherine Ellinghaus, Emeritus Professor Richard Broome and Professor Barry Judd (external)

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

More information

For more information, please contact Katherine Ellinghaus

Description

Archaeologists collect rich and complex spatiotemporal data in the course of their fieldwork. The aim is to incorporate this data into a 3D immersive VR database, as well as create in field AR tools for the reanalysis of archaeological legacy data. This will be done at the Palaeolithic site of Amanzi Springs and early hominin site of Drimolen in South Africa.

Supervisor

Professor Andy Herries and Dr Richard Skarbez

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

More information

For more information, please contact Andy Herries

Description

Amanzi Springs in South Africa is a rich Acheulian to Middle Stone Age archaeological site spanning multiple marine isotopes stages from ~520 to 160 ka. This project will reconstruct past environments at the site using a combination of pollen, magnetics, microfossils, wood and phytolith analysis.

Supervisor

Professor Andy Herries and Dr Matthew Meredith-Williams

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

More information

For more information, please contact Andy Herries

Description

This project aims to investigate the shift to sedentary life by excavating one of the earliest villages, founded by hunter-gatherers around 12,500 BCE. Of key interest are foundational burials at Wadi Hammeh 27 in Jordan and their role in the establishment of this new kind of settlement. Well-preserved deposits present a rare opportunity to track a community in the intial process of settling down. This project will investigate whether the Damya Formation overlying the Lisan formation in the northern Jordan Valley was deposited by a lake in the terminal Pleistocene (15,000 - 11,500 kya), a period which also saw the settlement of our Natufian project site, Wadi Hammeh 27, on the eastern flanks of the valley. Prior studies indicate that the Pleistocene Lake Lisan Lake in the Jordan Valley persisted from 60,000 kya but dried up by 15,000 kya. This lake recession should have set off deep erosion within the flanking stream valleys, but there is no sign of this in Wadi al-Hammeh. Confirmation of the existence of a 'Damiya Lake' after 15,000 kya would explicate the environmental setting of the first villages in the Natufian period.

Supervisor

Dr Phillip Edwards and Associate Professor John Webb

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents.

Special conditions

Applicants should have a First-Class Degree or M.Sc. in Earth Sciences.

More information

For more information, please contact Phillip Edwards

Description

This PhD project is part of a larger ARC-funded study of child rights, public inquiries and activism against institutional child abuse. The PhD project will investigate outcomes of the Australian Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, focusing on the implementation of recommendations and related policy and legislative reform.

Supervisor

Dr Katie Wright

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents.

Special conditions

Applicants should have a social science background and, ideally, previous knowledge and experience in areas relevant to the project.

More information

For more information, please contact Katie Wright

Description

The project aims to advance knowledge and scholarship in the fields of ethnohistory and Indigenous writing by prioritising Native American voices to reveal Indigenous strategies for negotiating between assimilation and tradition. It expects to provide a new perspective on Indigenous history by viewing Native writing as evidence of agency rather than dwindling Nativeness and will treat them as endeavours to define indigenous political modernities. Analysing the nuanced and diplomatic ways indigenous peoples responded to colonisation in the period between the Removal and the Indian Reorganization Act, the project will investigate how indigenous leaders moderated their traditions. It will draw on a wealth of Sioux historical records.

Supervisor

Dr Claudia Haake

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Applicants should have some background in Native American history.

More information

For more information, please contact Claudia Haake

School of Psychology and Public Health

Description

This PhD scholarship is related to a new qualitative project funded by the Australian Research Council. We are seeking an outstanding candidate with a strong track record of academic excellence in anthropology, sociology, gender studies or other relevant discipline (for example, youth studies, science and technology studies or education). The PhD project will complement the broader study which investigates the relationship between young people’s concerns about and experiences of drug consumption and the priorities of drug education. The successful applicant will collaborate with the Project Lead of the broader study to develop a thesis project, which is able to contribute to the aims of the larger project while also reflecting the interests and aspirations of the individual. The scholarship is based at the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society – one of the Australia leading research centres investigating the social dimensions of health, gender, sexuality and consumption.

Supervisor

Dr Adrian Farrugia

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents.

Special conditions

Please submit a one-page research project proposal, full CV and academic transcripts with your application.

More information

For more information, please contact Adrian Furrugia