THEORIES OF WORLD POLITICS

POL5TWP

2020

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

This subject provides foundational knowledge and skills concerning the major approaches to International Relations (IR) theory for postgraduate coursework students. The subject first explores the purpose and history of IR theory and then examines the following approaches: liberalism; realism; the 'English School'; constructivism; Marxist approaches; critical theory and post-structuralism; post-colonialism; feminist theory and green theory. Students critically analyse the central ideas associated with each theoretical approach, the major proponents of each theory, and the historical and political factors which have given rise to each approach. 

SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorDaniel Bray

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 5 - Masters

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites Enrolment in the Master of International Relations or nested degrees.

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjects POL3TWP or POL2TWP

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsInternational Relations Theories: Discipline and Diversity, 4th editionPrescribedTim Dunne et al 2016Oxford University Press

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Understand and critically analyse the main ideas and claims of each of the approaches to International Relations (IR) theory

Activities:
Lecture presentations and tutorial discussion activities; research essay, take-home exam
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

02. Understand how IR theories have emerged in response to changing intellectual, political and economic circumstances.

Activities:
Lecture presentations and tutorial discussion activities; research essay
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

03. Apply IR theories and research skills to construct arguments about contemporary world politics.

Activities:
research essay, take home exam
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Melbourne, 2020, Semester 2, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorDaniel Bray

Class requirements

Lecture Week: 32 - 43
One 2.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 32 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Tutorial Week: 32 - 43
One 1.0 hours tutorial per week on weekdays during the day from week 32 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Mid-semester Exam (1500 word equivalent)In-class exam consisting of extended answers to a list of questions35 01, 02
Research Essay (3000 words)Students are required to research and write an essay in response to a question set by the subject coordinator.65 01, 02, 03