UNDERSTANDING CRIME

LST1UNC

2020

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

Since the eighteenth century, Western societies have sought to explain systematically the causes of crime and criminality. This subject explores how different understandings of crime have emerged as a response to changing social, political and economic contexts. It also explores the usefulness of these understandings for explaining  and responding to crime today. The nature and impact of key criminological approaches ranging from classicism and positivism through to current day critical perspectives will be illustrated and analysed through consideration of contemporary case studies. The way in which criminological theories inform practical responses to crime within and beyond the criminal justice system will also be highlighted.

SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorHelena Menih

Available to Study Abroad StudentsNo

Subject year levelYear Level 1 - UG

Exchange StudentsNo

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites Enrolment in the Bachelor of Criminology or any Bachelor of Criminology double degrees

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsCrime and CriminologyPrescribedRob White, Fiona Haines, and Nicole Asquith 6th editionOUP

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Explain the emergence, nature and impact of key criminological approaches to explaining crime and criminality.

Activities:
Lecture, tutorial discussions, online activities and readings
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Quantitative Literacy,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Quantitative Literacy,Cultural Literacy)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Personal and Professional Skills (Teamwork including leadership and working in groups,Autonomy and independence,Ethical behaviour,Adaptability Skills,Study and Learning Skills)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

02. Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental differences between different criminological approaches by being able to clearly distinguish between them

Activities:
Lectures, tutorial discussions and online activities, readings, tutorial activities
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Quantitative Literacy,Cultural Literacy)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Personal and Professional Skills (Teamwork including leadership and working in groups,Autonomy and independence,Ethical behaviour,Adaptability Skills,Study and Learning Skills)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

03. Analyse the relationship between criminological theory and practical responses to crime within and beyond the criminal justice system.

Activities:
Lecture, tutorial discussions. online activities , readings, essay outline, essay
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Quantitative Literacy,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Quantitative Literacy,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Quantitative Literacy,Cultural Literacy)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Inquiry and Analytical Skills (Critical Thinking,Creative Problem-solving,Inquiry/Research)
Personal and Professional Skills (Teamwork including leadership and working in groups,Autonomy and independence,Ethical behaviour,Adaptability Skills,Study and Learning Skills)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

04. Identify and evaluate the ethical dimensions and implications of criminological thinking and practice.

Activities:
Lecture, tutorials discussions, online activities, readings, essay
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Quantitative Literacy,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Quantitative Literacy,Cultural Literacy)
Personal and Professional Skills (Teamwork including leadership and working in groups,Autonomy and independence,Ethical behaviour,Adaptability Skills,Study and Learning Skills)
Personal and Professional Skills (Teamwork including leadership and working in groups,Autonomy and independence,Ethical behaviour,Adaptability Skills,Study and Learning Skills)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

05. Speak and write in a concise, relevant and well-informed manner about criminological perspectives on crime and criminality

Activities:
Lectures and tutorial discussions, readings, online activities, essay outline, essay
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Quantitative Literacy,Cultural Literacy)
Literacies and Communication Skills (Writing,Speaking,Quantitative Literacy,Cultural Literacy)
Personal and Professional Skills (Teamwork including leadership and working in groups,Autonomy and independence,Ethical behaviour,Adaptability Skills,Study and Learning Skills)
Personal and Professional Skills (Teamwork including leadership and working in groups,Autonomy and independence,Ethical behaviour,Adaptability Skills,Study and Learning Skills)
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills (Discipline-Specific Knowledge and Skills)

Subject options

Select to view your study options…

Start date between: and    Key dates

Bendigo, 2020, Semester 2, Blended

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorHelena Menih

Class requirements

Tutorial Week: 31 - 43
One 1.0 hours tutorial per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Unscheduled Online Class Week: 31 - 43
One 1.5 hours unscheduled online class per week on any day including weekend during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via online.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
One research essay (2,000 words equivalent)Consists of two parts - a 500 word draft outline and 1500 word final essay40 03, 04, 05
Short answer exam (1,500 words equivalent)30 01, 02, 03
Online quizzes and case studies (1,000 words equivalent)30 01, 02

Melbourne, 2020, Semester 2, Blended

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorHelena Menih

Class requirements

Tutorial Week: 31 - 43
One 1.0 hours tutorial per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.

Unscheduled Online Class Week: 31 - 43
One 1.5 hours unscheduled online class per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via online.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
One research essay (2,000 words equivalent)Consists of two parts - a 500 word draft outline and 1500 word final essay40 03, 04, 05
Short answer exam (1,500 words equivalent)30 01, 02, 03
Online quizzes and case studies (1,000 words equivalent)30 01, 02