ZOOARCHAEOLOGY: THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANIMALS

ARC3ZOO

2020

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

Understanding the interaction between people and animals is vital for explaining past social, political and economic systems from the earliest times to the present day. Morphological changes occur within long-term climatic cycles and therefore we need to understand the processes that influence the trajectory of skeletal change. In addition to this, animals undergo changes to their skeleton from disease, nutrition, work load, environmental stress and domestication. This information is gleaned from studying a range of different zooarchaeological contexts. These include burials and cemeteries, middens, cave and body remains from other well-preserved sites. Techniques of analysis for interpreting health, diet, butchery practices, seasonal exploitation, ageing and sex of skeletal remains will be a focus of this subject, as well as the use of quantitative techniques. This subject has a strong practical element and students will learn about the main animal species found archaeologically in south-eastern Australia.

SchoolHumanities and Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorKeir Strickland

Available to Study Abroad/Exchange StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 3 - UG

Available as ElectiveNo

Learning ActivitiesN/A

Capstone subjectNo

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites 120cp completed

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsARC2ZOO

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Quota Management StrategyN/A

Quota-conditions or rulesN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Minimum credit point requirementN/A

Assumed knowledgeN/A

Readings

Australian Zooarchaeology

Resource TypeRecommended

Resource RequirementN/A

AuthorLUNA-Insight image database: www.lib.latrobe.edu.au

YearN/A

Edition/VolumeN/A

PublisherLA TROBE UNIVERSITY

ISBNN/A

Chapter/article titleN/A

Chapter/issueN/A

URLN/A

Other descriptionN/A

Source locationN/A

Zooarchaeology

Resource TypePrescribed

Resource RequirementN/A

AuthorReitz, E. and Wing, E.

YearN/A

Edition/VolumeN/A

PublisherCAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS

ISBNN/A

Chapter/article titleN/A

Chapter/issueN/A

URLN/A

Other descriptionN/A

Source locationN/A

Archaeology of animals.

Resource TypeRecommended

Resource RequirementN/A

AuthorDavis, S.

Year2005

Edition/VolumeN/A

PublisherROUTLEDGE

ISBNN/A

Chapter/article titleN/A

Chapter/issueN/A

URLN/A

Other descriptionN/A

Source locationN/A

The archaeology of animal bones

Resource TypeRecommended

Resource RequirementN/A

AuthorO'Connor, T

Year2000

Edition/VolumeN/A

PublisherSUTTON

ISBNN/A

Chapter/article titleN/A

Chapter/issueN/A

URLN/A

Other descriptionN/A

Source locationN/A

Career Ready

Career-focusedNo

Work-based learningNo

Self sourced or Uni sourcedN/A

Entire subject or partial subjectN/A

Total hours/days requiredN/A

Location of WBL activity (region)N/A

WBL addtional requirementsN/A

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

Graduate Capabilities

COMMUNICATION - Communicating and Influencing
DISCIPLINE KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS
INQUIRY AND ANALYSIS - Creativity and Innovation
INQUIRY AND ANALYSIS - Critical Thinking and Problem Solving
INQUIRY AND ANALYSIS - Research and Evidence-Based Inquiry

Intended Learning Outcomes

01. Identify major differences between faunal remains and discuss theoretical approaches to zooarchaeological analysis.
02. Compile and statistically analyse a database using archaeological materials such as bones and reference animal skeletons.
03. Communicate complex research effectively in a written format, supporting conclusions with appropriate evidence and literature.
04. Formulate, and evaluate, research questions appropriate to given datasets.

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Melbourne (Bundoora), 2020, Summer 2 , Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorRichard Cosgrove

Class requirements

Laboratory Class Week: 4 - 5
Ten 3.00 h laboratory class per study period on weekdays during the day from week 4 to week 5 and delivered via face-to-face.

Lecture Week: 4 - 5
Ten 1.00 h lecture per study period on weekdays during the day from week 4 to week 5 and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementCommentsCategoryContributionHurdle% ILO*
Submit 3 PeerWise multiple choice questions (500-word equivalent)N/AN/AN/ANo15 SILO4
One 1,000-word workshop presentationN/AN/AN/ANo20 SILO2
One 1-hour examination (1,000-word equivalent)N/AN/AN/ANo20 SILO1
One 2,000-word essayN/AN/AN/ANo45 SILO3