AFRICAN ARCHAEOLOGY

ARC2AFR

Not currently offered

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

Africa preserves the longest and most complete record of human history. Not only was it the birthplace of humanity, but it also preserves a record of all the critical transformations that have shaped the modern world. African Archaeology reviews current understanding of the narrative and dynamics of the earliest phases of humanity and the trajectories that helped shaped modern Africa. Specific topics discussed include the earliest human ancestors and their archaeological traces, the origin of modern humans, the emergence of plant and animal domestication, the introduction of iron-smelting and the establishment of complex societies.

SchoolHumanities and Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorNicola Stern

Available to Study Abroad/Exchange StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 2 - UG

Available as ElectiveYes

Learning ActivitiesEssay, short assignments, Workshop discussions

Capstone subjectNo

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites 15 credit points of Archaeology subjects or Coordinator's approval

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsARC3AFR

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Quota Management StrategyN/A

Quota-conditions or rulesN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Minimum credit point requirementN/A

Assumed knowledgeN/A

Readings

The First Africans: African Archaeology from the Earliest Toolmakers to the Most Recent Forages

Resource TypePrescribed

Resource RequirementN/A

AuthorBarham, L. & Mitchell, P.

Year2008

Edition/VolumeN/A

PublisherCAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS

ISBNN/A

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Chapter/issueN/A

URLN/A

Other descriptionN/A

Source locationN/A

Forgotten Africa: an introduction to its archaeology

Resource TypePrereading

Resource RequirementN/A

AuthorConnah, G.

Year2004

Edition/VolumeN/A

PublisherROUTLEDGE

ISBNN/A

Chapter/article titleN/A

Chapter/issueN/A

URLN/A

Other descriptionN/A

Source locationN/A

African archaeology: a critical introduction

Resource TypeRecommended

Resource RequirementN/A

AuthorStahl, A.

Year2005

Edition/VolumeN/A

PublisherBLACKWELL

ISBNN/A

Chapter/article titleN/A

Chapter/issueN/A

URLN/A

Other descriptionN/A

Source locationN/A

Career Ready

Career-focusedNo

Work-based learningNo

Self sourced or Uni sourcedN/A

Entire subject or partial subjectN/A

Total hours/days requiredN/A

Location of WBL activity (region)N/A

WBL addtional requirementsN/A

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

Graduate Capabilities

Intended Learning Outcomes

01. Apply skills and knowledge to assess new discoveries as they announced
02. Demonstrate an ability to evaluate alternative accounts of human evolution using published data
03. Demonstrate an ability to write an account of human evolution that uses appropriate data and interpretive frameworks
04. Demonstrate knowledge of cultural values, awareness and sensitivities surrounding discussions of human evolution
05. Effective participation in discussion of weekly topics and documentaries or display materials.
06. Show an understanding of the current literature pertaining to human behavioural evolution
07. The essay demonstrates an understanding of the substantive and methodological issues involved in writing a history of human behavioural evolution

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