Project-based scholarships

Applications for these scholarships are now open.

La Trobe University has a range of doctoral scholarships available for specific research projects or themes as part of our end-of-year scholarship round. Successful applicants will receive a scholarship that can help with fee-relief, living costs, and more.

In addition to the projects listed below, we also have a number of projects available for the ARC Research Hub for Medicinal Agriculture.

We also have a range of specialist scholarships advertised throughout the year, including industry and international partnership projects. You can find a list of current opportunities on our Graduate Research Scholarships page.

How to apply

Information on how to apply is available on our Graduate Research Scholarships page.

Make sure to read through the relevant project description closely too as many research projects have special conditions for applicants. Also applications cannot be accepted without the completed Research Statement Form and without in-principle agreement for you to apply from the nominated contact of the research project.

Available projects

School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport

Project title: The implementation of Community Treatment Orders (CTOs) in Victoria Australia

Description

Despite reforms aimed to reduce compulsory psychiatric treatment due to ethical and human rights concerns, compulsory treatment in both inpatient units and in the community remains commonplace in Victoria and there is considerable evidence that the use of compulsory treatment leads to harm and distress. There is also evidence nationally and internationally that compulsory treatment is applied arbitrarily, and disproportionally effects marginalised groups, especially members of the culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) community. There is considerable variation in the use of Community Treatment Orders (CTOs) across Victorian mental health services that is currently difficult to explain when all services are required to comply with same Mental Health Act and its underlying principles. This project will investigate the drivers underpinning the use of CTOs and how variations in their use may be explained and addressed.

Supervisor

Professor Lisa Brophy

Special conditions

Social work graduates and/ or people with Lived Experience of mental health issues, service use and recovery are encouraged to apply.

More information

For more information, please contact Lisa Brophy

Project title: Reduce Inappropriate Surgery of the Knee (RISK) by improving access to education and exercise therapy for people with osteoarthritis

Description

Education and exercise are recommended first line care for all people with knee osteoarthritis and should be adequately trialled before considering surgical intervention. Most Australians with osteoarthritis do not receive this care. Less than 4% are referred to any form of exercise when they present to their GP for help. This guideline to practice gap is estimated to cost the Australian healthcare system more than $300 million per year due to inappropriate surgery.

We are evaluating the effectiveness of a community-based model of care (RISK) which improves access to appropriate education and exercise for people with knee osteoarthritis referred for surgical opinion in Victorian public hospitals. You will join a large multi-disciplinary team to evaluate barriers and enablers to effectively implementing the RISK model of care. Your important work will inform improvements to education and exercise interventions, implementation strategies for health services, and potential health system funding reform.

Supervisor

Associate Professor Christian Barton

Special conditions

Preference will be given to candidates with clinical experience in the management of osteoarthritis.

More information

Details of the larger project team can be found here: http://semrc.blogs.latrobe.edu.au/risk/

For more information, please contact Christian Barton

Project title: Communication Connect: a technology enabled community rehabilitation and support program for people living with communication disability after stroke and traumatic brain injury

Description

Communication abilities are fundamental to everyday activity and social functioning, and vital to engaging with healthcare services. Over 250,000 Australians live with acquired communication disabilities resulting from stroke and traumatic brain injury, compromising every aspect of daily life, and significantly impacting mental health, employment, social participation, and family functioning. This population lacks well-coordinated rehabilitation transition and community support programs after hospital discharge, putting them at high risk of social, emotional, and physical isolation, and vulnerable to costly but avoidable medical and psychosocial complications. Our solution is Communication Connect: we will co-design and test the acceptability, feasibility, preliminary efficacy and costs of community and self-managed care program, based on multiple evidence-based components, and enhanced by latest communication, artificial intelligence and m-health technologies. We seek a PhD scholar to study within this new federally funded research program, with a focus on codesign and development of innovative therapy and support program components.

Supervisor

Professor Miranda Rose

Special conditions

Preference will be given to applicants with a professional qualification in speech pathology or psychology and a strong background in consumer involvement and co-design.

More information

For more information, please contact Miranda Rose

Project title: Staying connected: Personalising stroke recovery and rehabilitation through new technologies for people with stroke living at home

Description

A large proportion of stroke patients return to living in the community with chronic and complex health needs that are often left unmet, with devastating and long-term impact on their health and productivity. Our program of research will address the individual complexity of recovery over time, deliver therapy at the time of need in the community, and utilise new technologies to monitor and give interactive feedback, to enhance productivity goals.

The focus of this scholarship will be on the development and use of new technologies. First is monitoring the person in real-time in his/her home environment, using personalised wearable sensors and an application to survey the experience, to determine biopsychosocial markers of recovery and rehabilitation and to inform personalised needs and capacity. Second is the use of new technologies, including computer vision, to provide feedback during bursts of therapy in the community (therapist avatar). Third is a centralised hub with interactive database informed by artificial intelligence.

The research will be part of a collaborative program of research headed by Professor Leeanne Carey. The successful candidate will be based in the School of Allied Health Human Services and Sport (Neurorehabilitation and Recovery research group) and closely linked with the Research Centre for Data Analytics and Cognition at La Trobe University.  The successful candidate will have opportunity to collaborate with researchers from La Trobe University, Florey institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of South Australia, The University of Newcastle and internationally.

Supervisor

Professor Leeanne Carey

Special conditions

Essential skills and experience

  • Strong programming skills in Python and/or C++
  • Experience in Computer Vision and/or Machine Learning
  • The ability to work in a collaborative, agile environment

Highly desirable skills and experience

  • Experience in deep learning programming frameworks, including TensorFlow or PyTorch
  • Experience in application of skills to health issues
  • Experience in Cloud technologies (AWS, GCP or Azure)
  • Visualisation using PowerBI or Tableau

Full CV, relevant experience and academic transcripts are to be included with your Expression of Interest.

Selected candidates will be invited to an interview with the supervisory team.

More information

For more information, please contact Professor Leeanne Carey or Professor Damminda Alahakoon

School of Education

Project title: What can we learn from COVID-19? The long term "keepers" from the rapid transformation of learning and teaching at Universities through working and learning from home

Description

This project develops a sustainable model for learning and teaching in a post COVID-19 world. It investigates staff and student experiences, technology adoption and pedagogical advancements and researches both the new status quo and future retention of these recently adopted approaches with a focus on STEMM disciplines.

Supervisor

Professor Birgit Loch

Special conditions

Need to be familiar with qualitative research methodology and ideally have a background in educational research, experience teaching online and face to face, and expertise in educational technologies and their adoption. Will be based in the School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences.

More information

For more information, please contact Birgit Loch

Project title: Interactive multimedia objects (360 degree, augmented, virtual reality) to enhance or replace in situ and face to face learning

Description

This project develops an educational framework encompassing the design and use of digital interactive objects such as 360 degree videos and photos, augmented and virtual reality to simulate real world learning experiences across STEMM disciplines.

Supervisor

Professor Birgit Loch

Special conditions

Need to be familiar with qualitative research methodology and educational technologies and ideally have a background in educational research. Will be based in the School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences.

More information

For more information, please contact Birgit Loch

School of Engineering and Mathematical Science

Project title: Size-dependent behaviour of micro/nano functionally graded graphene reinforced composite structures

Description

The fundamental aim of this proposal is to study relative effects of the inter-atomic long-range force and the microstructure deformation mechanism on size-dependent behaviour of micro/nano functionally graded graphene reinforced composite structures with various geometries and boundary conditions. Various the higher order continuum theories including the modified couple stress theory, modified strain gradient theory, doublet mechanics are employed by using finite element model (FEM) or isogeometric analysis (IGA). Linear, nonlinear behaviours are studied and structural responses (displacement, stresses, vibration and buckling) are investigated.

Supervisor

Associate Professor Thuc Vo

Special conditions

Strong background in mathematic, FEM, IGA, Matlab programing and publications related to the topic.

More information

For more information, please contact Thuc Vo

Project title: Process-property performance relationships of plasma sprayed ceramic-composite coatings

Description

Ceramic coatings are used in a variety of industrial applications, from providing wear resistance to being used as part of thermal protection systems. With the greater demands on providing increased efficiencies for such application, new materials systems need to be developed. This project will use the plasma spray technique to form ceramic deposits with a variety and combination of ceramic materials; and study the effects of the processing-properties and performance of the coatings.

Supervisor

Dr Mitchell Sesso

Special conditions

A strong background in materials science or mechanical engineering is required.

More information

For more information, please contact Mitchell Sesso

Project title: Mathematical modelling for infectious disease control

Description

The Coronavirus pandemic highlights a need for mathematical modelling to guide critical policy decisions, with many new questions requiring urgent investigation. This research provides a student the opportunity to make immediate impact on public health policy. Diseases with pandemic potential have been emerging roughly every 5 years, so this is an area of research that is likely to have long-term importance.

The successful applicant will develop and analyse mathematical models which will help with understanding:

  • the impact of population heterogeneity on the spread of SARS-CoV-2 and the effectiveness of interventions.
  • the ethical implications of interventions to control infectious disease. How and when can we justify restricting one person’s actions to protect others?
  • the spread of misinformation about diseases and therapies, and potential interventions to reduce its impact.
  • disease spread in wildlife and livestock.

Supervisor

Dr Joel Miller

More information

For more information, please contact Joel C Miller

Project title: Problems in discrete geometry and geometric graph theory

Description

Discrete geometry is a branch of mathematics that deals with questions about large arrangements of geometric objects such as points, lines and polygons, and underpins digital technologies that deal with geometric data. This project will explore questions that link discrete geometry and graph theory, the mathematical theory of networks.

Supervisor

Dr Michael Payne

Special conditions

The successful applicant will be based at the Bendigo campus.

More information

For more information, please contact Michael Payne

Project title: Wireless AI for the next generation wireless networks

Description

This project aims to introduce cognition, intelligence, automation, and agility for future wireless communication system design with the cutting-edge artificial intelligence techniques. The project will develop new tools and frameworks for physical and MAC layers by integrating the communication domain knowledge with combined analytical and data-driven modelling.

Supervisor

Dr Peng Cheng

Special conditions

Will need to have extensive research experience in wireless communications (physical and MAC layers), signal processing, and machine learning.

More information

For more information, please contact Peng Cheng

Project title: What can we learn from COVID-19? The long term "keepers" from the rapid transformation of learning and teaching at Universities through working and learning from home

Description

This project develops a sustainable model for learning and teaching in a post COVID-19 world. It investigates staff and student experiences, technology adoption and pedagogical advancements and researches both the new status quo and future retention of these recently adopted approaches with a focus on STEMM disciplines.

Supervisor

Professor Birgit Loch

Special conditions

Need to be familiar with qualitative research methodology and ideally have a background in educational research, experience teaching online and face to face, and expertise in educational technologies and their adoption. Will be based in the School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences.

More information

For more information, please contact Birgit Loch

Project title: Interactive multimedia objects (360 degree, augmented, virtual reality) to enhance or replace in situ and face to face learning

Description

This project develops an educational framework encompassing the design and use of digital interactive objects such as 360 degree videos and photos, augmented and virtual reality to simulate real world learning experiences across STEMM disciplines.

Supervisor

Professor Birgit Loch

Special conditions

Need to be familiar with qualitative research methodology and educational technologies and ideally have a background in educational research. Will be based in the School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences.

More information

For more information, please contact Birgit Loch

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Project title: Virtual and augmented reality of South African palaeolithic and early hominin fossil sites

Description

Archaeologists collect rich and complex spatiotemporal data in the course of their fieldwork. The aim of this research is to incorporate the data into a 3D immersive VR database, as well as create in field AR tools for the reanalysis of archaeological legacy data. This will be done at the Palaeolithic site of Amanzi Springs and early hominin site of Drimolen in South Africa.

Supervisor

Professor Andy Herries

More information

For more information, please contact Andy Herries

Project title: Parched: Cultures of drought in regional Victoria

Description

The ARC funded project ‘Parched: Cultures of drought in regional Victoria’ is an environmental humanities project examining the changing ways Victorians have lived with, imagined, understood and represented drought. We aim to link cultural and media practices with climate histories to establish a new interdisciplinary model of drought cultures and generate new knowledge of the social and cultural dimensions of drought in rural and regional areas.

The project is led by Professor Katie Holmes and based in La Trobe’s Centre for the Study of the Inland. The interdisciplinary team of Chief Investigators comprises Profs Susan Martin and Lawrie Zion, A/Prof Jacqueline Millner, Drs Tom Ford, Linden Ashcroft and Karen Twigg. This scholarship opportunity offers the chance to work with this exceptionally strong team of environmental humanities scholars. A suggested focus for the research of the successful applicant is the WWII drought across three regions: Albury/Wodonga, Shepparton and Bendigo, although this is open to discussion.

Supervisors

Professor Katie Holmes

Special conditions

This scholarship is only available to domestic applicants. Applicants living outside Victoria will be required to move to Victoria if successful (Albury resident excepted). Preference will be given to applicants with a background in an environmental humanities discipline, especially history, literature or media. Indigenous applicants are encouraged to apply.

More information

For more information, please contact Katie Holmes

School of Life Sciences

Project title: Development and validation of sustainable fungicide platform against Botrytis

Description

As a member of the ARC-funded ITR Hub for Sustainable Crop Protection, the successful applicant will develop and validate an RNAi-based fungicide platform for targeting pathogens of domestic and global significance to horticulture, including Botrytis. The final objective is to deliver a product with zero crop residue and low risk for resistance development.

Supervisors

Associate Professor Kim Plummer

Special conditions

The candidate will be part of the ARC Hub for Sustainable Crop Protection and will actively participate to Hub activities, including but not limited to, workshops and general meetings.

More information

For more information, please contact Kim Plummer

Project title: Developing a sustainable monitoring system for invasive alien species in Australia

Description

One of the key challenges with managing invasive alien species once they have arrived and established in a country, is monitoring their spread. The information obtained from monitoring is needed to quickly identify newly invaded localities so the weed or pest can be eradicated, or to identify priority areas that it is expanding into so that the invader can be contained. Australia does not yet have a nation-wide monitoring program for invasive alien species. This PhD research project will combine citizen science, data science and information on species distributions to develop a monitoring approach and indicators for tracking priority invaders in Australia. This PhD project forms part of an ARC Discovery Project (DP) on the role of common species in communities and ecosystems.

Supervisor

Professor Melodie McGeoch

Special conditions

The successful candidate will have majored in ecology, have a working knowledge of R and a background and interest in statistics / data analysis / data science.

More information

For more information, please contact Professor Melodie McGeoch

Project title: Neuroecology - Investigating the neural bases of animal behaviour in the context of its habitat and ecology

Description

The Neuroecology Laboratory uses neurobiological techniques (bioimaging, electrophysiology, anatomy and behaviour) to examine how environment cues (light, odours, electric fields and sound) are detected and processed and how this influences behaviour. Apply if interested in any of the following research areas:

Using structure-function relationships, evolutionary and/or developmental approaches to understand the neural bases of behaviour in the context of ecology

Research will concentrate on vision, chemoreception, audition, lateral line and/or electroreception in a range of fishes to understand the selection pressures acting on environmental adaptation.

Sensory ecology of deep-sea organisms

Examining the structure and function of different sensory modalities in a range of deep-sea fishes in order to understand and predict their behaviour and vulnerability to anthropogenic influences.

Chemoreception in fishes: anthropogenic impacts on brain and behaviour

Assessing the impacts of critical and targeted ecotoxicants and anthropogenic changes in aquatic conditions on the chemosensory capabilities of Australian fishes.

Supervisor

Professor Shaun Collin

Special conditions

  • be enthusiastic and highly motivated to undertake further study at an advanced level with a keen interest in the research themes of the Neuroecology Group;
  • be able to demonstrate strong academic performance in subjects relevant to neuroanatomy, sensory ecology, comparative physiology, and/or behavioural neurobiology and have a strong desire to learn new and complex analytical techniques;
  • have strong written and communication skills, with the ability to work independently and in a team-oriented context.

More information

For more information, please contact Shaun Collin

Project title: The role of rhizosphere priming in soil carbon and nitrogen cycles under elevated atmosphere CO2 conditions

Description

In the future, farmers will be producing crops under elevated CO2. It is unknown how the increased CO2 level will affect agricultural production and soil health in Australia and around the world. The PhD research is part of an Australian Research Council funded project which aims to understand how high atmospheric CO2 affects carbon and nitrogen cycles in major cropping soils. Specifically, the project will quantify the effect of elevated CO2-induced rhizodeposition on decomposition of soil organic matter under key crop species, elucidate the interconnection between soil organic matter mineralisation and nitrogen availability as influenced by rhizodeposition, and determine the long-term effects of elevated CO2 on organic carbon composition in major farming soils and microbiological contribution to carbon and nitrogen cycles. The project intends to provide fundamental information to evaluate the potential impact of climate change on soil fertility and productivity.

Supervisors

Professor Caixian Tang & Professor Ashley Franks

Special conditions

Preference will be given to a candidate who has research experience in soil organic matter, soil biology and/or rhizosphere. A strong background in soil science with good laboratory skills is required.

More information

For more information, please contact Professor Caixian Tang

Project title: Ecological strategies of ants

Description

A PhD scholarship is available investigating the ecological strategies of ants. Ecological traits are particularly valuable in understanding generality in responses of species to their environments, but many traits are interrelated, resulting in a limited spectrum of possible ecological strategies. Using a variety of ecologically important, but rarely-measured traits, this project will enhance our understanding of the ecological strategies of ants and identify parallels with plants. The PhD student will be based in Prof Heloise Gibb’s Insect Ecology Laboratory at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia, and be engaged with an international collaboration centred around the laboratories of Prof Ian Wright (Macquarie University), Prof Kate Parr (Liverpool University, UK) and Prof Nathan Sanders (University of Michigan, USA). The student will use data from the Global Ants Database and their own field and laboratory investigations to understand the ecological strategies of ants.

Supervisor

Professor Heloise Gibb

More information

For more information, please contact Heloise Gibb

Project title: Determining how the soluble dietary fibre mixed linkage β-glucan is synthesised and regulated in cereals

Description

This project is focussed on revealing new knowledge about the molecular mechanism(s) of synthesis and regulation of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan (mixed-linkage glucan, MLG), a major soluble dietary fibre component of cereal grain cell walls. The major polysaccharide synthase is CSLF6, an enzyme of Glycosyltransferase (GT) family 2 (www.cazy.org/), the same family to which many of the enzymes that make cell surface glycans in plants, bacteria, fungi and mammals belong. The student will: (i) attempt to reconstitute CSLF6 with the aim of obtaining detailed structural information about the enzyme, and (ii) undertake domain-swap experiments in plants and bacteria to obtain further insight into the synthesis and regulatory mechanisms utilised by MLG synthases.

Supervisors

Associate Professor Monika Doblin and Professor Antony Bacic

Special conditions

A background in protein biochemistry is desired, as is experience with recombinant protein production and purification, in addition to molecular & cellular biology skills.

More information

For more information, please contact Monika Doblin

Project title: Plant Science Research

Description

Plant cells are encased by polysaccharide-rich cell walls that provide mechanical support and protection against pathogens. However, efforts to change the cell walls to improve pathogen resistance often impair plant yield. This is because plants sense cell wall changes through cell wall integrity signaling, which hampers our ability to modify cell walls for biotechnological advancements. By understanding cell wall integrity signaling mechanisms, it may be possible to improve plants without decreasing yield. In this project, the PhD student will aim to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cell wall integrity signaling and how this impacts the plant’s ability to resist against pathogens.

Supervisors

Professor Jim Whelan and Dr Ghazanfar Khan

More information

For more information, please contact Ghazanfar Khan or Professor Jim Whelan

School of Molecular Sciences

Project title: Defining the molecular regulators of apoptotic cell disassembly and their role in cell clearance and lupus-like autoimmune disease

Description

In humans, billions of cells will die daily as part of normal turnover in various organs. It is vital that dying cells are rapidly removed as their accumulation has been linked to autoimmunity and inflammation. To aid efficient removal of dead cells, dying cells can disassemble into smaller fragments for neighbouring cells to engulf. We aim to understand the machinery that controls how dying cells can disassemble into smaller pieces and their function in cell clearance and autoimmunity.

Supervisor

Associate Professor Ivan Poon

Special conditions

A strong background in cell biology, cell death, zebrafish and mouse models is preferrable.

More information

For more information, please contact Ivan Poon

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Project title: The 'long arm of the job': Parents' jobs and children's development

Description

This PhD project will investigate the relationship between parents’ work stressors (job strains, work-family conflict), time pressure, and well-being and school-based outcomes for children and adolescents. The scholar will use secondary data from a range of sources, including national cohort and / or survey data from Australian families, and conduct a new companion qualitative study to explore these themes in-depth, shedding light on these issues in a post-Covid context. Evidence from this project will inform parents, workplaces and policy-makers about optimal supports for working parents across all family stages.

Supervisor

Dr Amanda Cooklin

Special conditions

This scholarship is only available to domestic applicants. Preference will be given to those with a background in Sociology, Public Health or Psychology and with some experience in quantitative data analyses.

More information

For more information, please contact Amanda Cooklin

School of Psychology and Public Health

Project title: Drugs, sex/gender and human rights

Description

This PhD scholarship will support a qualitative project aimed at critically investigating the relationship between drug policy, sex/gender and human rights. Ideally the project will focus on illicit substances but innovative proposals exploring licit substances will also be considered. A strong background in gender studies, sexuality studies, posthuman theory, sociology or science and technology studies is preferred.

Supervisor

Dr Kate Seear

Special conditions

Please ensure that you submit a two-page research project proposal, full CV and academic transcripts including subject results with your application.

More information

For more information, please refer to Scholarships, Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University and contact Kate Seear

Project title: Infectious disease, gender and stigma

Description

This PhD scholarship will support a qualitative project aimed at investigating the relationship between infectious disease, gender and stigma. Ideally the project will address the blood-borne virus hepatitis C, but other health issues will also be considered. A strong background in gender studies, sexuality studies, sociology or science and technology studies is preferred.

Supervisor

Professor Suzanne Fraser

Special conditions

Please ensure that you submit a two-page research project proposal, full CV and academic transcripts including subject results with your application.

More information

For more information, please refer to Scholarships, Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, La Trobe University and contact Suzanne Fraser

Project title: Understanding heavy alcohol consumption cultures among nurses and lawyers

Description

This PhD scholarship is related to a new ethnographic Project funded by the Australian Research Council and the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation (VicHealth). We are seeking an outstanding applicant with a strong track record of academic excellence in anthropology, sociology, gender studies or other relevant discipline (i.e. youth studies).

The Project will collect ethnographic and qualitative interview data to comprehensively investigate drinking cultures among nurses and lawyers and aims to generate important new knowledge on the cultural and social practices that shape drinking among nurses and lawyers, and illuminate relations between drinking cultures and alcohol-related problems. The successful applicant will collaborate with the chief investigators to identify an ethnographic thesis project, which is able to contribute directly to the aims of the larger project while also reflecting the interests and aspirations of the individual.

The Scholarship is located at La Trobe’s CAPR – an innovative, multi-disciplinary world-class research facility at the forefront of alcohol research. Our research is used to promote and inform the development of evidence-based, effective alcohol policy in Australia and internationally. Our team of established and emerging experts, both in alcohol and related fields and research methods, offers doctoral candidates opportunities to develop and maximise their skills, networks and careers.

Supervisor

Dr Robyn Dwyer

Special conditions

This Scholarship is available to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian Permanent Residents only.

The successful applicant will be required to undertake field research (participant observation, interviews, observation) involving work in the evening and on weekends.

More information

For more information, please contact Dr Robyn Dwyer

Project title: Alcohol's harm to others

Description

This doctoral research scholarship in alcohol epidemiology and public health is to be awarded to an outstanding candidate to undertake research aimed at understanding harm from others’ drinking in Australia. This mixed-methods research project will use epidemiological survey and in-depth interviews. The project will address a range of potential problems linked to the drinking of others, including family violence, car crashes and more subtle impacts on relationships and roles.

Supervisor

Dr Anne-Marie Laslett

Special conditions

Applicants should have a background in public health, quantitative and/or qualitative methods. An interest in international health is desirable.

More information

For more information, please contact Anne-Marie Laslett

Project title: Mothers' little helper: Alcohol use in working mothers

Description

This project aims to generate detailed insights into the strains that Australian working mothers face in their daily lives and the impact these strains have on their alcohol consumption. It will use innovative methods to understand the strains resulting from two major life domains, family and work, and reveal the amount, variability and co-occurrence of daily job- and family-related strains working mothers in Australia. It aims to investigate the impact of environmental and social risk and protective factors on the (co-) occurrence of job-and family-related strains and how both aspects (factors and strains) interact to determine daily affect and in consequence maternal alcohol use. The results of this study can provide significant benefits not only to the quality of life of working mothers in Australia but society wide with alcohol use being a leading avoidable cause social, community and economic harms and costs.

Supervisor

Dr Sandra Kuntsche

Special conditions

Applicants you should have an interest in public health, quantitative and/or qualitative methods.

More information

For more information, please contact Sandra Kuntsche