Lunch time talks

Person delivering talkJoin our researchers as they present some of the latest developments in their research in short, engaging presentations, followed by an opportunity to ask questions.

All talks take place on the indicated date from 1 until 2pm.

A light lunch will be offered to attendees at the end of the second session.

27 August 2018: Digital Health

Lunchtime Talk: Digital Health

Date, time and venue

  • Date and time: 27 August 2018, 1 - 2pm
    Venue: Research Commons, second floor, Borchardt Library, La Trobe University Melbourne Campus
  • Video-conferencing from other campuses:
    • Bendigo: ARTS-403
    • Albury Wodonga: AW-4-4101
    • Mildura: no room available
    • Please note that Shepparton Campus is running their own research week talks at the same time; therefore the lunchtime talks are unable to be video-conferenced.
Digital Health is becoming more and more important in today’s society. Join us as La Trobe researchers explore the effect of our digital lives on our health.

Speakers

  • Dr Dana Wong
    Telehealth delivery of memory rehabilitation after stroke: Its efficacy and clinical implementation.
  • Memory difficulties affect around half of stroke survivors, impacting functional outcomes and quality of life. Memory skills programs training use of compensatory strategies have been found to improve everyday memory function, however mobility issues and geographic location can limit access to these programs. Telehealth delivery of memory rehabilitation may overcome these barriers; however, evidence of equivalent effectiveness is needed. In this presentation, Dana will describe her program of research evaluating the comparative efficacy of a memory skills program delivered face-to-face (F2F) and via telehealth (internet-enabled videoconferencing). She will report results demonstrating that telehealth delivery was at least as effective as F2F delivery in improving everyday memory function. She will also briefly outline the results of a qualitative study of clinicians’ experience in delivering memory rehabilitation via telehealth. This research has significant implications for improving access to effective memory rehabilitation for survivors of stroke.

  • Associate Professor Tony McGillion
  • Opening the virtual telehealth door to the enabling of a future nursing workforce - one byte at a time.

    Tony McGillion is an Associate Professor in Nursing Practice. Together with Karrie Long (Telehealth manager at Melbourne Health), Tony will speak about the successful partnership between Melbourne Health and La Trobe University.

    Many of the current undergraduates in Nursing have grown up with technology and the paradigm of ‘one click to get there or do not bother’.  The advent of knowledge found through internet sources is changing the way we learn and teach. We have been talking about these ‘digital natives’ for some time but the ‘way we do things’ is now beginning to gain digital momentum.

    Currently, there is a sense of divergence between what we know about the near (and far) future demands on how we deliver healthcare in Australia and how we prepare our workforce to meet the demand.  Only if we remove our blinkers can we imagine what healthcare may look like in 50 years – we are currently constrained by our own imagination.  Embedding our undergraduate nursing students into the telehealth environment is a logical step as they can be active contributors to the evaluation of how we are using technologies to promote more patient-focused and cost effective care for the whole system.

    At Melbourne Health we are piloting a study where a small number of Year 3 La Trobe University students will rotate through the telehealth area as part of their Primary Health Nursing subject.  We hope this approach will provide a parallel mentoring context where technology-savvy students can contribute to the placement as opposed to the oft one-way information exchange where students feel less confident to proffer their own opinions.

    Evaluation is planned through a qualitative approach, probing into the opinions of the students and the staff they work with through a phenomenological approach.

  • Ms Ashley Ng
    Thinking outside the box – using social media as an mHealth tool"
  • Ms. Ashley Ng is a lecturer from the School of Allied Health in Dietetics and Human Nutrition,  She will share her recent PhD project which shows how social media can play a role in mHealth.  Supporting young adults with diabetes during life transitions using MHealth will be the focus of her talk.  Come and listen to how technology can be used to improve our lives.

  • Associate Professor Miranda Rose (moderator)

28 August 2018: Alcohol, Culture, and Family Violence

Lunchtime Talk: Alcohol, Culture, and Family Violence

Date, Time and Venue

  • Date and time: 28 August 2018, 1 - 2pm
    Venue: Research Commons, second floor, Borchardt Library, La Trobe University Melbourne Campus
  • Video-conferencing from other campuses:
    • Bendigo: CLT-211
    • Albury Wodonga: AW-4-4101
    • Mildura: BGR-135
    • Please note that Shepparton Campus is running their own research week talks at the same time; therefore the lunchtime talks are unable to be video-conferenced.

Alcohol use is embedded in Australian culture, and an intrinsic part of social lives. However, alcohol misuse is also associated with significant harm to individuals, families and the broader community. Addressing alcohol use as a public health issue is of critical importance for the development of sustainable, equitable and effective policies.

This session will showcase the productive collaborations between three La Trobe research centres on these issues – the Centre for Alcohol Policy (CAPR), the Judith Lumley Centre for mother, infant and family health research (JLC), and the Australian Institute for Primary Care & Ageing (AIPCA). Through the combined expertise of research, evaluation, policy development and knowledge translation, La Trobe University’s work on alcohol aims to make a significant impact on public health issues.

Speakers

  • Dr Amy Pennay
    Dr Amy Pennay will discuss the influence of drinking norms, cultural practices, and social contexts and introduce CAPR’s work with VicHealth to build a framework for understanding alcohol cultures.
  • Dr Virgina Lewis
    Associate Professor Virginia Lewis will highlight the role and expertise of AIPCA in evaluating nine projects funded through the VicHealth alcohol culture initiative. Working in partnership with CAPR and VicHealth, the evaluation explores the extent to which the alcohol culture framework can help to develop and deliver effective interventions to create culture change.
  • Dr Ingrid Wilson
    Dr Ingrid Wilson from JLC will discuss the collaborative work of CAPR and JLC on the issue of alcohol-related intimate partner and family violence, her input to the Victorian Royal Commission into the Prevention of Family Violence, and the current work with VicHealth to develop a research agenda on alcohol-related violence against women.
  • Dr Ann-Marie Laslett
    Dr Anne-Marie Laslett will present CAPR’s significant work on ‘Alcohol’s Harm to Others’ which draws on international collaborations to highlight the impact of alcohol’s misuse on people other than the drinker. The impact of alcohol’s harm to children is a specific focus of her work.
  • Professor Robin Room (moderator)

29 August 2018: Environment

Lunchtime Talk: the Environment

Date, Time and Venue

  • Date and time: 29 August 2018, 1 - 2pm
    Venue: Research Commons, second floor, Borchardt Library, La Trobe University Melbourne Campus
  • Video-conferencing from other campuses:
    • Bendigo: HHS2-2.51
    • Albury Wodonga: AW-4-4101
    • Mildura: BGR-135
    • Please note that Shepparton Campus is running their own research week talks at the same time; therefore the lunchtime talks are unable to be video-conferenced.

Join some of La Trobe University’s environment experts as they talk about the current state of the environment, how it is changing, and how we can make a positive impact.

Speakers

  • Dr Nikki Thurgate
    The Environmental Water Knowledge and Research Project: research and applications.
  • Abstract: The Murray-Darling Basin Environmental Water Knowledge and Research Project (EWKR) is a six-year project established by the Australian Government to give water agencies the information they need to confidently and continually adjust the volume and timing of water flowing in streams, rivers and floodplains in tune with changing environmental conditions, to protect and restore healthy and productive aquatic ecosystems. This talk outlines the EWKR Project’s research in important ecosystems and their applications throughout the Murray-Darling Basin.

  • Professor Andrew Bennett
  • Dr Ruth Gamble
    Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOFS), Cloud Lake Outburst Floods (CLOFS), and Ice Stupas: how water relations in the Ladakh Himalaya have changed.
  • The Indian region of Ladakh in Jammu and Kashmir is one of the highest habitable areas of the world and is located in the headwaters of the Indus River, in the border regions between India, China and Pakistan. This presentation will introduce the ways that both climate change and development in this politically and environmentally sensitive region have changed the Ladakhi’s relationship to water.

30 August 2018: Powerhouse Women

Lunchtime Talk: Powerhouse Women

Date, Time and Venue

  • Date and time: 30 August 2018, 1 - 2pm
    Venue: John Scott Meeting House
  • Video-conferencing from other campuses:
    • Bendigo: HHS2-2.51
    • Albury Wodonga: AW-4-4101
    • Mildura: BGR-135
    • Please note that Shepparton Campus is running their own research week talks at the same time; therefore the lunchtime talks are unable to be video-conferenced.

Join four of La Trobe’s Powerhouse Women in research to hear more about their personal stories in science, cybersecurity, sociology, and literature.

Speakers

  • Professor Jenny Graves
  • Professor Jilly Slay
  • Professor Katie Holmes
  • Associate Professor Clare Wright

More info

31 August 2018: Social Inclusion

Lunchtime Talk: Social inclusion

Date, Time and Venue

  • Date and time: 31 August 2018, 1 - 2pm
    Venue: Research Commons, second floor, Borchardt Library, La Trobe University Melbourne Campus
  • Video-conferencing from other campuses:
    • Bendigo: HHS2-2.51
    • Albury Wodonga: AW-4-4101
    • Mildura: BGR-135
    • Please note that Shepparton Campus is running their own research week talks at the same time; therefore the lunchtime talks are unable to be video-conferenced.

What does social inclusion look like in this day and age, and how can we achieve it? Join the discussion with expert speakers from the Olga Tennison Autism Research Centre, the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, the John Richards Centre for Rural Ageing Research, and the Centre for Sport and Social Impact.

Speakers

  • Dr Kristelle Hudry
    Can effective early intervention for pre-schoolers with autism be provided within socially inclusive settings?

    The issue of inclusion vs. segregation is increasingly relevant to the context of autism and the early childhood sector as growing numbers of children are diagnosed in the toddler and preschool period. While our society may value the broad inclusion of people with disability, it remains to be seen whether early intervention for young children with autism can be feasibly and effectively provided within mainstream inclusive early childhood settings. Across 2015-2018, the Victorian ASELCC Team at La Trobe University has been conducting a pilot randomised controlled trial to understand whether the Group-Early Start Denver Model (G-ESDM) early intervention program can be feasibly and effectively provided to young children with autism within mainstream playrooms of LTU’s Community Children’s Centre which also houses two autism-specific ASELCC playrooms. This talk will include an outline of the project and outcome data for the 44 child participants in this trial to date
  • Dr Jennifer Power
  • Dr Suzanne Hodgkin
    Understanding loneliness in Australian rural ageing populations  - a mixed methods approach

    This presentation focuses on understanding both the predictors of loneliness, and how loneliness is contructed among diverse rural ageing populations and presents data from an ARC Linkage project, ASPIRE.  The presentation will critically discuss these findings in the context of social networks and the sources of support for rural older people.
  • Dr Emma Seal
    Women’s fear of judgement, physical (in)activity and social exclusion
  • The focus of this lightning talk is women’s experience of social exclusion in relation to physical activity and active living. The Centre for Sport and Social Impact has conducted an evaluation of the ‘This Girl Can’ campaign, which has been delivered by the Victorian Health Promotion Agency (VicHealth). The campaign is targeted at inactive and somewhat active women and aims to help them overcome the fear of judgement, whilst representing a more diverse (e.g. body size, cultural background, age) range of women getting active.

    Our research uses a fear of judgement lens to understand the impact of wider socio-cultural factors, norms and processes that stop women accessing different physical activity spaces and staying, being or getting active. Rather than conceptualising (in)activity as an individual responsibility, our research demonstrates that what is happening at the individual, inter-group (i.e. during social interaction)  and environmental level all impact on women’s engagement with physical activity. These practices demonstrate the nuanced nature of how social exclusion operates as an inhibiting mechanism for women’s engagement with physical activity.

  • Ms Sophia Tipping
    Including People with Cognitive Disabilities in Australian Elections

    La Trobe University’s Living with Disability Research Centre are collaborating with the Victorian Electoral Commission and Inclusion Melbourne to explore the inclusion of people with cognitive disabilities (intellectual disability or acquired brain injury) in elections. This presentation will detail the various collaborative research strands of this project and present preliminary findings. A survey of staff in the disability sector found that, despite a lot of good will they took minimal action to support voting by people with intellectual disabilities and were uncertain how to do this. Focus groups with people with intellectual disability found that they had diverse political perspectives and experienced many obstacles to voting. Funded by the TAC, Inclusion Melbourne are using our expertise to work with politicians to make their key messages simpler and more accessible to people with acquired brain injury, and the Electoral Commission is designing and piloting an educational intervention that will help disability services to better support people with intellectual disabilities to vote in the November 2018 state election.
  • Associate Professor Fiona Kelly (moderator)