Psychology colloquium - How does the brain sense and respond to hunger

Event status:

A Department of Psychology and Counselling colloquium presented by Assoc. Prof. Zane Andrews, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Monash University.

Date:
Thursday 23 May 2019 04:00 pm until Thursday 23 May 2019 05:00 pm (Add to calendar)
Contact:
Maarten van den Buuse
m.vandenbuuse@latrobe.edu.au
Presented by:
Assoc. Prof. Zane Andrews
Type of Event:
Seminar/Workshop/Training
Cost:
Free

It is clear that a state of hunger elicits numerous effects on the brain and body, not just those related to food intake. Assoc. Prof. Andrews’ group investigates how metabolic neural circuits detect hunger and hypoglycemia and link states of hunger with mood, motivation, memory and metabolism. This presentation will highlight hunger-sensing Agouti-related peptide (Agrp) neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. These neurons are fundamental to survival. Not only do they increase food intake during energy deficit but they also facilitate adaptive behaviors reducing anxiety and increasing motivation. Using a number of genetic approaches, Agrp neurons were shown to also promote beneficial behavioural adaptations under acutely stressful conditions. The results suggest that prior activation of hunger-sensing Agrp neurons enables appropriate food-seeking behaviour after acute stress.

Speaker information

Associate Professor Andrews received his PhD in New Zealand at the University of Otago in 2003 and has 15 years’ experience in the field of neuroendocrinology and neuroscience. He undertook postdoctoral training at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA (2004-2008). He moved Monash University in Melbourne, Australia in 2009 and established his own laboratory. Dr Andrews is currently a National Health Medical Research Council Career Development Fellow Level II and Deputy Head of the Monash Metabolism, Diabetes and Obesity program.

Associate Professor Andrews uses mouse and viral genetic techniques to study how food or the lack of food affects behaviour and peripheral metabolism. He is primarily interested in understanding the neural circuits that sense hunger or hypoglycemia and influence metabolism, mood and motivation. His work focuses on the hormone ghrelin as a key hormonal signal of hunger and AgRP neurons as key hunger-sensing neurons in the brain and his research over a number of years has shown that hunger influences peripheral metabolism as well as many non-food associated behaviours such as anxiety and neuroprotection.

Lecture details

Thursday May 23, Time: 4 - 5 pm
Hoogenraad Theatre, LIMS1-101, Bundoora campus;
Wodonga AW1 113 Library Meeting Room; Bendigo AS2-224B.

Contacts

For more information please contact seminar convener Prof Maarten van den Buuse.

Map:

La Trobe University Victoria 3086

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