Living with Disability Research Centre Research Seminar Series

Event status:

September Seminar

Date:
Wednesday 14 September 2022 03:00 pm until Wednesday 14 September 2022 05:00 pm (Add to calendar)
Contact:
James Pilbrow
lids@latrobe.edu.au
Presented by:
Living With Disability Research Centre
Type of Event:
Public Lecture; Public

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) awareness and practitioner views
LiDs research fellow Dr Kerryn Bagley and FASD parent advocate Ms Agelene Bruce speak about FASD awareness. Professor Anita Gibbs from the University of Otago, NZ, presents on practitioner views on understanding and helping youth living with FASD.


Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD): Hidden in plain sight

Dr Kerryn Bagley, Living with Disability Research Centre, La Trobe University, and Ms Angelene Bruce, FASD Awareness Advocate

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is a neurocognitive disability with a prevalence rate higher than well-recognised conditions such as Autism and Down Syndrome. Yet professionals in health, social service, disability and education report that they know little about it. In this presentation, Dr Kerryn Bagley will provide an introduction to FASD, and Ms Angelene Bruce will talk about her lived experience as an FASD awareness-raiser on social media and mother of a child with FASD. The presentation will provide insight into current FASD research and will explore some of the reasons why FASD is often called an ‘invisible disability’. This is a special presentation for International Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) awareness month, in conjunction with the Victorian FASD Special Interest Group.

Best Practices for Justice: Practitioner views on understanding and helping youth living with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)

Professor Anita Gibbs, University of Otago

This presentation will focus on a study which explored justice practitioner views of helping young people living with FASD especially when they come into contact with the youth justice system in Aotearoa New Zealand. International studies and New Zealand publications note that care, as well as youth and adult justice populations, have high rates of FASD and other neuro-disabilities, alongside mental health problems and adverse childhood experiences. In this study practitioners reported limited knowledge and understanding of FASD, resulting in delays in getting appropriate supports for youth living with FASD. Practitioners spoke of the importance of early diagnosis leading to early intervention but how rare that was.


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