How human rights can be defended and extended

Event status:

Gillian Triggs and Julian Burnside come together for what promises to be a fascinating conversation of national importance as they consider how the regime of human rights in Australia can best be defended and extended.

Date:
Thursday 03 May 2018 06:30 pm until Thursday 03 May 2018 08:00 pm (Add to calendar)
Contact:
University Events
universityevents@latrobe.edu.au
Presented by:
Ideas & Society Program, Gillian Triggs and Julian Burnside
Type of Event:
Current Student: Undergraduate; Current Student: Postgraduate; Alumni; Community Event; Public Lecture; Public
Cost:
$30 General / $20 Alumni & Staff/ $15 Students

6.15 pm registration for a 6.30 pm start.

Many people would agree that Gillian Triggs and Julian Burnside are the two most significant defenders of human rights in contemporary Australia. La Trobe University’s Ideas & Society Program is immensely pleased and proud to be able to announce that they have agreed to come together, as part of our “Better Australia?” series, in what promises to be a fascinating conversation of national importance.

Gillian Triggs is a distinguished international lawyer who has held professorships in the Law Schools of both the University of Sydney and the University of Melbourne. Between 2012 and 2017 she was President of Australia’s Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Commission, where she served with integrity, grace and courage in the face of unrelenting political pressure.

Julian Burnside AO QC, a highly successful commercial lawyer, is best known as Australia’s most eloquent, principled and unwavering human rights advocate. He has worked pro bono on countless asylum seeker cases but was also the lead barrister in the Trevorrow case, the first successful stolen generations litigation.

Gillian Triggs and Julian Burnside will discuss the many serious threats to human rights we presently face—over the treatment of asylum seekers, the rise of anti-Muslim extremism, the challenge to the legal protections against expressions of racial hatred, the passage of far-reaching anti-terror laws, and the many areas where discrimination against women and indigenous Australians still exist. Even more importantly, they will consider how the regime of human rights in Australia can best be defended and extended.

Map:

Experimedia

State Library of Victoria, 328 Swanston Street, Melbourne VIC 3000

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