Plant ecology

    Recent Publications (2015-2018)

  • Burns et al.  (2018) Making monitoring work: insights and lessons from Australia's Long Term Ecological Research Network. Australian Zoologist doi.org/10.7882/AZ.2018.030
  • Dashiel et al.  (2018) Insect herbivory on snow gum (Eucalyptus pauciflora, Myrtaceae) saplings near the alpine treeline: the influence of local-and landscape-scale processes. Australian Journal of Botany 65, 582-592.
  • Greenville et al. (2018) Biodiversity responds to increasing climatic extremes in a biome-specific manner. Science of the Total Environment 634, 382-393.
  • Hodapp et al. (2018) Spatial heterogeneity in species composition constrains plant community responses to herbivory and fertilisation. Ecology Letters 21, 1364-1371.
  • Hautier et al. (2018) Local loss and spatial homogenization of plant diversity reduce ecosystem multifunctionality. Nature Ecology and Evolution 2, 5056.
  • Koerner et al. (2018) Change in dominance determines herbivore effects on plant biodiversity. Nature Ecology and Evolution 2, 1925-1932.
  • Moore et al. (2018) Effects of drought and fire on resprouting capacity of 52 temperate Australian perennial native grasses. New Phytologist doi.org/10.1111/nph.15480
  • Morgan et al. (2018) What does it take to do successful adaptive management? A case study highlighting Coastal Grassy Woodland restoration at Yanakie Isthmus. Ecological Management and Restoration 19, 111-123.
  • Zamin et al. (2018) Enhancing plant diversity in a novel grassland using seed addition. Journal of Applied Ecology55, 215-224.
  • Zeeman et al. (2018) Non-native plant cover and functional trait composition of urban temperate grasslands in relation to local-and landscape-scale road density. Biological Invasions 20, 3025-3036.
  • Zeeman & Morgan (2018) Increasing and declining native species in urban remnant grasslands respond differently to nitrogen addition and disturbance. Annals of Botany 121, 691-697.
  • Fensham et al. (2017) Subtropical native grasslands may not require fire, mowing or grazing to maintain native-plant diversity. Australian Journal of Botany 65, 95-102.
  • Harpole et al. (2017) Out of the shadows: multiple nutrient limitations drive relationships among biomass, light and plant diversity. Functional Ecology 31, 1839-1846.
  • Kendal et al. (2017) The importance of small urban reserves for plant conservation. Biological Conservation 213, 146-153.
  • Morgan et al. (2017) Upper range limit establishment after wildfire of an obligate-seeding montane forest tree fails to keep pace with 20th century warming. Journal of Plant Ecology11, 200-207.
  • Morgan & Venn (2017) Alpine plant species have limited capacity for long-distance seed dispersal. Plant Ecology 218, 813-819.
  • Westoby et al. (2017) How species boundaries are determined: a response to Alexander et al. Trends in Ecology and Evolution 32, 8-9.
  • Sams et al. (2017) Landscape context explains changes in the functional diversity of regenerating forests better than climate or species richness. Global Ecology and Biogeography 26, 1165-1176.
  • Schultz et al. (2017) The golf ball method for rapid assessment of grassland structure. Ecological Management & Restoration 18, 134-140.
  • Zeeman et al. (2017) Biotic homogenization in an increasingly urbanized temperate grassland ecosystem. Journal of Vegetation Science 28, 550-561.
  • Egidi et al. (2016) Fire regime, not time-since-fire, affects soil fungal community diversity and composition in temperate grasslands. FEMS Microbiology Letters doi.org/10.1093/femsle/fnw196
  • Farmilo et al. (2016) Plant growth in a fragmented forest is a consequence of top-down and bottom-up processes, but not their interaction. Journal of Plant Ecology 10, 601-609.
  • Grace et al. (2016) Integrative modelling reveals mechanisms linking productivity and plant species richness. Nature 529, 390-393.
  • Harpole et al. (2016) Addition of multiple limiting resources reduces grassland diversity. Nature 537, 93-96.
  • Morgan et al. (2016) Species origin affects the rate of response to interā€annual growing season precipitation and nutrient addition in four Australian native grasslands. Journal of Vegetation Science 27, 1164-1176.
  • Tredennick et al. (2016) Comment on “Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness”. Science 351, 457-458.
  • Cross et al. (2015), A plant strategy approach to understand multidecadal change in community assembly processes in Australian grassy woodlands. Journal of Ecology 103, 1300–1307.
  • Fay et al. (2015) Grassland productivity limited by multiple nutrients. Nature Plants 10.1038/nplants.2015.80
  • Mark et al. (2015) Ecological responses to 52 years of experimental snow manipulation in high-alpine cushionfield, Old Man Range, south central New Zealand. Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research 47, 751-772.
  • O'Loughlin et al. (2015), The rise and fall of Leptospermum laevigatum: plant community change associated with the invasion and senescence of a range-expanding native species. Applied Vegetation Science 18, 323–331.
  • Seabloom et al. (2015) Plant species’ origin predicts dominance and response to nutrient enrichment and herbivores in global grasslands. Nature Communications 6, 7710
  • Stevens et al. (2015) Anthropogenic nitrogen deposition predicts local grassland primary production worldwide. Ecology96, 1459-1465.
  • Williams et al. (2015), An International Union for the Conservation of Nature Red List ecosystems risk assessment for alpine snow patch herbfields, south-eastern Australia. Austral Ecology 40, 433–443.
  • Wong et al. (2015) The incorporation of fungal to bacterial ratios and plant ecosystem effect traits into a state-and-transition model of land-use change in semi-arid grasslands. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 210, 11-19.