Project-based scholarships

Applications for these scholarships are now open.

La Trobe University has a range of doctoral scholarships available for specific research projects as part of our end-of-year scholarship round. Successful applicants will receive a scholarship that can help with fee-relief, living costs, and more.

How to apply

If you wish to apply for a graduate research scholarship to undertake one of these projects, please make sure to:

  • review details on how to apply for PhD candidature
  • select a project from the available projects listed below
  • check the project requirements for eligibility and any additional special conditions
  • contact the nominated contact person for your preferred project via email to express your interest and obtain their in-principle agreement for you to apply
  • complete your application for admission into La Trobe’s PhD program
  • complete a Research Statement Form for your nominated project (only one project can be nominated) and attach this to your application
  • a research proposal is not required unless specifically requested as a special condition

Domestics applicants, submit your application to the La Trobe Graduate Research School (admissions.grs@latrobe.edu.au) by 31 October 2021

International applicants, submit your application via the International Online Application System by 30 September 2021

Your application cannot be accepted without the completed Research Statement Form and without in-principle agreement for you to apply from the nominated contact of the research project.

If you have any further questions about the application process, please contact grs@latrobe.edu.au

Available projects

La Trobe Rural Health School

Project title: Sleep Quality of Rural Health Care Professionals

Description

Using secondary analysis of ongoing longitudinal studies and through conducting new primary research this project will explore the impact of the rural and remote context (shift patterns, time on call, staff shortage, multiple roles etc..) on the sleep quality of health care professionals, and the impact of these contexts on their health and well-being.

Supervisor

Professor Timothy Skinner

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

More information

For more information, please contact Timothy Skinner

School of Allied Health, Human Services and Sport

Project title: The young and the restless? Sleep and athletic performance in development athletes

Description

The importance of sleep and factors that may impair sleep, such as training and social media use have potential to have profound effects on not only performance but wellbeing in the developing athlete. This project will investigate these inter-related factors and look at interventions to target behaviours to enhance sleep and wellbeing.

Supervisor

Dr Matt Driller

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Matt Driller

Project title: Tired mind, tired body: Cognitive fatigue and physical performance

Description

The effect of cognitive activity on physical performance is currently a hot topic with exciting new findings emerging. These findings may help us understand how to prepare for performance (should you shut off social media?), manage training (are video games a good leisure activity?), and accelerate results. This research will explore the effects of different fatiguing tasks on different physical tasks, and the impact of interventions to lessen any negative effects. It is appropriate for students with a background in psychology, or sport science.

Supervisor

Dr Clare MacMahon

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Clare MacMahon

Project title: Enhancing injury prevention in the female athlete

Description

Compared to men, women have double the risk of serious knee injury when participating in sport. While many injury prevention programs are available and tested, including in women’s sport, the factors that influence the injury prevention programs’ effectiveness is not known. This project will build on our previous injury prevention studies, to adapt and test injury prevention strategies for women.

This project will explore (a) the mechanisms of injury for the female athletes, compared to men; (b) whether current injury prevention programs can address the injury mechanisms for women; (c) how the delivery of an injury prevention influences its effectiveness; and (d) a novel, enhanced injury prevention program for women.

Supervisor

Professor Kay Crossley

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

Special conditions

Preference will be given to a health professional. A strong background in/experience with injury prevention or rehabilitation is preferred.

More information

For more information, please contact Kay Crossley

Project title: Gender- and sex-specific factors associated with sport / physical activity participation following knee surgery

Description

Women have more than double (2–8 times) the serious knee injury risk associated with sports participation, and consistently report worse burden (e.g. poorer quality of life and function, and greater symptoms) than men. Almost no studies have explored possible solutions for the sex- and/or gender-bias in women’s outcomes. This project will explore the sex-related differences in (a) patient outcomes, (b) physical activity (including running) participation, and (c) biomechanics strength and function in people who have sustained a knee injury, and/or surgery. It will also explore how gendered factors (including access to rehabilitation and socioecological factors) can influence these sex-related differences. The results of this project will help to inform new gender- and sex-specific rehabilitation for people following knee injury and/or surgery.

Supervisor

Professor Kay Crossley

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

Special conditions

Preference will be given to a health professional. A strong background in/experience with rehabilitation of knee injury/surgery is preferred.

More information

For more information, please contact Kay Crossley

School of Cancer Medicine (Olivia Newton John Cancer Research Institute)

Project title: Targeting cell surface receptor signalling in the tumour microenvironment - Receptor Biology Laboratory

Description

Cancer development and spread depends on interactions of tumour cells with surrounding normal cells, which stimulate growth, new blood vessel formation, and evasion of anti-tumour immune responses. We study the role of cell surface proteins, including receptor tyrosine kinases and metalloproteases, which mediate intercellular signalling in tumours and the surrounding microenvironment (TME). To facilitate this we modulate the expression or function of these proteins, either genetically, or using novel monoclonal antibodies, which we develop as new potential therapeutic agents. This project will study genetic and antibody-mediated modulation of Eph cell guidance receptors, which are elevated in tumours and the TME in a range of tumour types. The research will employ cell and animal based tumour models, and involve cutting edge microscopy, flow cytometry, proteomic and single-cell sequencing technologies.

Supervisor

Dr Peter Janes

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

The Olivia Newton John Cancer Research Institute will offer a top up of $2,414 per annum to successful applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Peter Janes

Project title: Characterisation of Novel Her2 Therapies

Description

The use of treatments targeting oncogenic addictions have demonstrated high response rates and improved outcomes in a variety of solid tumours. Amplification and overexpression of the HER2 gene as the oncogenic driver has been reported in human breast and gastric cancers; establishing HER2 as a major target for therapy. This project will advance the emerging field of HER2 biology and therapeutics and provide novel therapeutic options through the development of novel HER2-targeting therapies. We have generated a first-in-class novel monoclonal antibody against a tumour-specific form of HER2, that shows great promise for treating HER2-positive cancers and is predicted to have minimal toxicity and is tumour specific with a high therapeutic ratio. We will extended this work to mAb based antibody drug conjugates and engineered versions of this antibody suitable for multiple therapeutic indications.

Supervisor

Professor Andrew Scott

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

The Olivia Newton John Cancer Research Institute will offer a top up of $2,414 per annum to successful applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Andrew Scott

Project title: New treatments for colon cancer

Description

The project seeks to develop new treatments for colon cancer through the rational  combination of existing and emerging therapies. The project will involve working with pre-clinical models of colon cancer (cell lines, organoids and animal models) and molecular studies to understand the mechanisms by which new drugs work.  The project will also involve the analysis of clinical trial samples from patients undergoing these treatments.

Supervisor

Professor John Mariadason

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

The Olivia Newton John Cancer Research Institute will offer a top up of $2,414 per annum to successful applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact John Mariadason

School of Engineering and Mathematical Science

Project title: Machine Learning for Digital Twins

Description

The development of reliable and agile digital twins of high-tech systems is key to enabling shorter time-to-market, zero-defect and flexible manufacturing systems with accurate predictive maintenance. This crucial development is currently hampered by the lack of synergy between model-based engineering and data-driven/artificial intelligence approaches. The DIGITAL TWIN project will develop key-enabling technologies for full digitization of the value chain of high-tech systems by the integration of data-driven learning approaches and model-based engineering methods.

Supervisor

Professor Wei Xiang

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Wei Xiang

Project title: Explainable AI: Making Machine/Deep Learning models explainable

Description

Traditional AI technologies such as Machine/Deep learning used in developing intelligent/smart solutions largely rely on utilising best representative test datasets and features engineering and less on the available domain expertise. We argue that such approach to solution development makes the outcome of solutions less explainable. There is a growing concern among policy makers that with wider applicability of AI solutions in all walks of life and the lack of explainability of such solutions, it creates hindrance in acceptability and trustworthiness of such solutions. In this PhD project, the candidate will work on developing techniques and methodologies to make deep learning models more transparent.

Supervisor

Professor Wei Xiang

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Wei Xiang

Project title: Evolutionary hyper-heuristic for Data Science

Description

Data science is an emerging topic in computer science. It concerns various tasks such as data collection, data analysis, data visualisation, and data clustering. This project will examine the possibility of combining the strengths of evolutionary hyper-heuristic approaches and data science from two perspectives: the potential applications of evolutionary hyper-heuristic approaches in big data analytics and the possibility of using data analytics techniques to enhance evolutionary performance hype-heuristic approaches.

Supervisor

Dr Nasser Sabar

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Nasser Sabar

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Project title: Parched: Cultures of drought in regional Victoria

Description

The ARC funded project ‘Parched: Cultures of drought in regional Victoria’ is an environmental humanities project examining the changing ways Victorians have lived with, imagined, understood and represented drought. We aim to link cultural and media practices with climate histories to establish a new interdisciplinary model of drought cultures and generate new knowledge of the social and cultural dimensions of drought in rural and regional areas. The project is led by Professor Katie Holmes and based in La Trobe’s Centre for the Study of the Inland. The interdisciplinary team of Chief Investigators comprises Profs Susan Martin and Lawrie Zion, A/Prof Jacqueline Millner, Drs Tom Ford, Linden Ashcroft and Karen Twigg. This scholarship opportunity offers the chance to work with this exceptionally strong team of environmental humanities scholars. A suggested focus for the research of the successful applicant is the WWII drought across three regions: Albury/Wodonga, Shepparton and Bendigo, although this is open to discussion and we welcome applicants to suggest their own area of focus provided it falls within the parametres of the project.

Supervisor

Professor Katie Holmes

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

Special conditions

Applicants living outside Victoria will be required to move to Victoria if successful (Albury resident excepted). Ideally applicants will have a background in an environmental humanities discipline, especially history, literature or media but this is not essential. Indigenous applicants are encouraged to apply.

More information

For more information, please contact Katie Holmes

Project title: Virtual and augmented reality of South African palaeolithic and early hominin fossil sites

Description

Archaeologists collect rich and complex spatiotemporal data in the course of their fieldwork. The aim is to incorporate this data into a 3D immersive VR database, as well as create in field AR tools for the reanalysis of archaeological legacy data. This will be done at the Palaeolithic site of Amanzi Springs and early hominin site of Drimolen in South Africa.

Supervisor

Professor Andy Herries, Dr Richard Skarbez

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Andy Herries

Project title: Environmental Reconstruction of the Acheulian to Middle Stone Age site of Amanzi Springs, South Africa.

Description

Amanzi Springs in South Africa is a rich Acheulian to Middle Stone Age archaeological site spanning multiple marine isotopes stages from ~520 to 160 ka. This project will reconstruct past environments at the site using a combination of pollen, magnetics, microfossils, wood and phytolith analysis.

Supervisor

Professor Andy Herries, Dr Matthew Meredith-Williams

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Andy Herries

School of Life Sciences

Project title: How climate change will impact soil health and productivity: The role of crop root activity in soil carbon and nitrogen cycling under high atmosphere CO2 conditions

Description

Increasing levels of atmospheric CO2 are causing climate warming. However, it is poorly understood what challenges farmers will face to produce crops under such conditions. Elevated CO2 is known to stimulate plant growth and increase root exudation (rhizodeposition) in the soil, which then stimulates microbial activity. Yet it is unknown as to how the increases in CO2 levels will affect agricultural production and soil health. This PhD research is part of a funded project which aims to understand how high atmospheric CO2 affects carbon and nitrogen cycles in major cropping soils. Specifically, this project will quantify the effect of elevated CO2-induced rhizodeposition on the decomposition of soil organic matter in soils growing different crop species; elucidate the interconnection between soil organic matter decomposition and nitrogen availability as influenced by rhizodeposition; determine the long-term effects of elevated CO2 on organic carbon composition and content in major farming soils; and understand the microbiological contribution to carbon and nitrogen cycling under elevated CO2. The project intends to provide vital information that will enable a prediction of the potential impacts of climate change on soil fertility and productivity.

Supervisor

Professor Caixian Tang

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

Special conditions

We are seeking for an enthusiastic candidate with an outstanding Masters or Bachelor Honours degree in agricultural science or relevant fields. Research experience in soil organic matter, soil biology and/or plant rhizosphere is advantageous but not critical.

More information

For more information, please contact Caixian Tang

Project title: Determining how the soluble dietary fibre mixed linkage β-glucan is synthesised and regulated in cereals

Description

This project is focussed on revealing new knowledge about the molecular mechanism(s) of synthesis and regulation of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan (mixed-linkage glucan, MLG), a major soluble dietary fibre component of cereal grain cell walls. The major polysaccharide synthase is CSLF6, an enzyme of Glycosyltransferase (GT) family 2 (www.cazy.org), the same family to which many of the enzymes that make cell surface glycans in plants, bacteria, fungi and mammals belong. The student will: (i) attempt to reconstitute CSLF6 with the aim of obtaining detailed structural information about the enzyme, and (ii) undertake domain-swap experiments in plants and bacteria to obtain further insight into the synthesis and regulatory mechanisms utilised by MLG synthases.

Supervisor

Dr Monika Doblin, Professor Tony Bacic

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents.

Special conditions

Preference will be given to students who are available to start prior to April 2022. A background in protein biochemistry is desired, as is experience with recombinant protein production and purification, in addition to molecular & cellular biology skills.

More information

For more information, please contact Monika Doblin

Project title: Quantifying scales of endemism in rare and common forest invertebrates: conservation implications

Description

Biodiversity conservation decisions rely heavily on knowledge of the range sizes and distributions of species. However for small and cryptic species, such as insects and other invertebrates, data on species distributions are often sparse. This project will investigate how to combine molecular and population data to provide more robust estimates of species ranges to feed into conservation decisions. The research will be conducted using forest invertebrates (such as velvet worms, millipedes and stag beetles) from post-fire landscapes and habitat refuges across Victoria and New South Wales.

Supervisor

Professor Melodie McGeoch, Dr Heloise Gibb

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

Special conditions

A strong background or interest in data analysis (maths and/or statistics) and experience using R.

More information

For more information, please contact Melodie McGeoch

Project title: Role of nitrogen availibility in plant defence

Description

Nitrogen is the most important nutrient for plant growth and defense against biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant biologist and breeders have largely focused their efforts on how nitrogen impacts growth and yield. However, the role of nitrogen in plant defense has largely been ignored. While nitrogen supply can both increase and decrease the severity of disease, the molecular mechanisms that explain nitrogen-dependent regulation of plant defense are not well understood. PhD candidate will apply advanced molecular biology, omics technologies and confocal microscopy to unravel the molecular mechanisms that underpin nitrogen dependent regulation of plant defenses. This exciting project will qualify the candidate for an excellent career in R&D industry, and/or academia and the candidate will have a good opportunity to build connections with broader research communities.

Supervisor

Dr Ghazanfar Khan, Professor Jim Whelan

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Ghazanfar Khan

Project title: Mitochondrial Biogenesis and Signalling in Plants

Description

This proposal aims to define the mechanisms of how mitochondrial growth and stress signalling interact and areregulated. Mitochondria are central machines in cells that use energy obtained through photosynthesis to drivegrowth and also play an important role in sensing and responding to non-optimal environmental growth conditions.As mitochondrial growth and stress signalling are antagonistic, growth is retarded when stress signalling isactivated. Thus, the outcomes will be new knowledge and understanding of how plants balance growth and stressresponses. This benefit of this knowledge and understanding is that it can be used to pursue novel avenues tooptimise crop performance in changing and adverse environments.

Supervisor

Professor Jim Whelan

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Jim Whelan

Project title: Specialised pollination systems and the conservation of Australian orchids

Description

Australia has a diverse and charismatic orchid flora, characterised by numerous species with deceptive pollination strategies. Unfortunately, many of our orchid species are now highly endangered, necessitating intensive conservation efforts such as reintroductions. Using the focal genus of Caladenia, widely known for its numerous sexually deceptive species, we are offering three potential PhD topics that would provide information toward the objective of improved reintroduction success: (i) Increasing recruitment and reducing mortality to improve conservation translocations of threatened orchids. (ii) Environmental vs phenotypic factors affecting reproductive success in endangered orchids. (iii) Species delimitation, distribution, and ecology of orchid-pollinating thynnine wasps.

Supervisor

Dr Ryan Phillips, Professor Rod Peakall (ANU), Dr Noushka Reiter (Royal Botanic Gardens of Victoria)

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

  • a driver’s license
  • a willingness to undertake extensive periods of fieldwork if needed
  • a willingness to learn appropriate statistical and/or laboratory methods

More information

For more information, please contact Ryan Phillips

School of Molecular Sciences

Project title: Modulating innate immune responses

Description

Dysfunction of the innate immune system leads to overactive or underactive responses such as extreme cytokine storms or inability to fight cancer cells. This project will investigate pharmacological regulation of cellular proteins involved in suppressing overactive immune responses to enable improved control of the immune system.

Supervisor

Professor Helen Irving

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

This project is located in Bendigo. A background in molecular cell biology or immunology or pharmacology or biochemistry is preferred.

More information

For more information, please contact Helen Irving

Project title: Evolution and function of insect odorant receptors

Description

Insects use their olfactory system to detect host plants and animals. In this project you will contribute to an Australian Research Council-funded project investigating the evolution and function of the large odorant receptor gene family of the Australian sheep blowfly. The sheep blowfly is a major pest species for which there is strong industry desire to transition to control practises that reduce environmental and animal welfare concerns. This project will reveal important fundamental aspects of how these proteins function, as well as identify receptors for important host odors that may contribute to future pest control efforts.

Supervisor

Professor Coral Warr

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

A strong background in molecular genetics and cell biology is necessary.

More information

For more information, please contact Coral Warr

Project title: Visualizing the molecular mechanisms of genetic mutation

Description

These scholarships will be awarded to outstanding applicants who are keen to undertake interdisciplinary biomedical research in a collaborative and innovative laboratory. Projects will be adapted to the right applicant’s area of interest and expertise, with a common goal of using advanced microscopy to visualize and better understand the molecular pathways that underly disease.

As an applicant you should have strong undergraduate training in at least one area of science or biomedicine and, importantly, a desire to branch out into other disciplines. Acceptable undergraduate majors include molecular/cell biology, chemistry, physics, computer science, genetics, biochemistry, or similar. Available research projects include development of new fluorescence microscopy techniques and analyses for super-resolution imaging; imaging of DNA damage and repair in cancer and neurodegenerative models; imaging of genetic engineering events; single molecule in vitro studies of DNA-protein interactions; and characterization of new fluorophores.

Supervisor

Dr Donna Whelan

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents.

More information

For more information, please contact Donna Whelan

Project title: Extracellular vesicles from the fungal pathogen Candida albicans and their role in fungal infections

Description

Fungal diseases have a serious impact in both the clinic and in agriculture. There is increasing concern because they are growing in incidence and severity and many fungal pathogens are becoming resistant to the antifungal chemicals or drugs that are currently used for their control. Recently our laboratory and others have discovered that fungal pathogens produce membrane bound vesicles called extracellular vesicles that appear essential to the infection process. EVs are well known to have a role in cancer progression, neurodegenerative disorders and bacterial diseases but little is known about their role in fungal diseases. Our aim is to isolate and fully characterise EVs from the plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum and the human pathogen Candida albicans and to discover how they contribute to the infection process.

Supervisor

Professor Marilyn Anderson, Dr Maria Liaskos

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

More information

For more information, please contact Marliyn Anderson

Project title: Outfoxing the fox: new ways to protect declining freshwater turtles

Description

Australian freshwater turtles are declining, and nest destruction by invasive foxes appears to be one of the major drivers. Traditional lethal fox controls like 1080 baiting and shooting have had limited effectiveness. Instead of controlling foxes, this project aims to test the effectiveness of several methods of protecting turtle nests from foxes. The project will be field-based in south-eastern Australia and include turtle population surveys, mark-recapture, and radiotelemetry, as well as aquatic ecosystem monitoring. It will also involve community engagement with on-ground stakeholders and managers who manage the study sites and help find and protect turtle nests. In addition to the management outcomes, the project is an excellent opportunity to develop additional research on hatchling turtle ecology, which is relatively unknown. The successful candidate will work with a team of internationally-recognised turtle ecologists at La Trobe, Western Sydney University, University of New England, and The University of Sydney.

Supervisor

Dr James Van Dyke

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

This scholarship is only available to applicants located in Australia. The project is based at the Albury-Wodonga campus of La Trobe and has a heavy focus on fieldwork in nearby regional areas, so preference will be given to applicants able to be based in the Albury-Wodonga area. A background in aquatic ecology, conservation, or vertebrate biology is preferred. Indigenous applicants are encouraged to apply.

More information

For more information, please contact James Van Dyke

Project title: Atom-scale engineering of diamond-based quantum computers

Description

This project aims to demonstrate an atomically-precise fabrication technique for the production of diamond quantum microprocessors, using scanning tunnelling microscopy to develop a novel bottom-up engineering approach. The PhD student will make use of advanced ultra-high vacuum STM facilities based at La Trobe University and will work as part of a large team of engineers and scientists in collaboration with Quantum Brilliance, an Australian-based quantum computing start-up company, and RMIT University.

Supervisor

Professor Chris Pakes

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

More information

For more information, please contact Chris Pakes

School of Nursing and Midwifery

Project title: The 'long arm of the job': Parents' jobs, work conditions and family wellbeing

Description

This PhD project will investigate the relationship between parents’ work stressors (job strains, work-family conflict), time pressure, and family well-being. The scholar will use secondary data from a range of sources including data collected during 2020/21; and conduct a new companion qualitative study to explore these themes in-depth, shedding light on these issues in a post-Covid context. Evidence from this project will inform parents, workplaces and policy-makers about optimal supports for working parents across all family stages.

Supervisor

Dr Amanda Cooklin

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents.

Special conditions

This scholarship is only available to domestic applicants. Preference will be given to those with a background in Sociology, Public Health or Psychology and with some experience in quantitative data analyses.

More information

For more information, please contact Amanda Cooklin

School of Psychology and Public Health

Project title: Infectious disease, gender and stigma

Description

This PhD scholarship will support a qualitative project aimed at investigating the relationship between infectious disease, gender and stigma. Ideally the project will address the blood-borne virus hepatitis C, but other health issues will also be considered. A strong background in gender studies, sexuality studies, sociology or science and technology studies is preferred.

Supervisor

Professor Suzanne Fraser

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents.

Special conditions

Please submit a two-page research project proposal, full CV and academic transcripts with your application. The successful applicant may occasionally need to conduct fieldwork (e.g. interviews, observation) in the evening and on weekends.

More information

For more information, please contact Suzanne Fraser

Project title: Mothers' little helper: Alcohol use in working mothers

Description

This project aims to generate detailed insights into the strains that Australian working mothers face in their daily lives and the impact these strains have on their alcohol consumption. It will use innovative methods to understand the strains resulting from two major life domains, family and work, and reveal the amount, variability and co-occurrence of daily job- and family-related strains working mothers in Australia. It aims to investigate the impact of environmental and social risk and protective factors on the (co-) occurrence of job-and family-related strains and how both aspects (factors and strains) interact to determine daily affect and in consequence maternal alcohol use. The results of this study can provide significant benefits not only to the quality of life of working mothers in Australia but society wide with alcohol use being a leading avoidable cause social, community and economic harms and costs.

Supervisor

Dr Sandra Kuntsche

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents.

More information

For more information, please contact Sandra Kuntsche

Project title: The role of organisational factors in facilitating long-term employment for people on the autism spectrum

Description

The research project will examine the role of organisational factors like leadership & organisational culture in facilitating long-term employment for people on the autism spectrum.

Supervisor

Professor Cheryl Dissanayake, Dr Jennifer Spoor, Dr Simon Bury

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants currently in Australia.

Special conditions

Individuals who self-identify as autistic or on the autism spectrum are strongly encouraged to apply. Disclosure is not required.

More information

For more information, please contact Cheryl Dissanayake

Project title: Improving diabetes and hypertension in South Asian countries

Description

This project will involve research with collaborators in India to improve the prevention and management of diabetes and hypertension in the community. With the advent of COVID-19, the traditional delivery of programs involving community health workers now needs to shift to more hybrid delivery involving technology. This research is funded by Australia’s NHMRC and other agencies and is investigating how to do this effectively. Previous public health training and quantitative skills are important skills for this research.

Supervisor

Professor Brian Oldenburg

Eligibility

Open to Australian or New Zealand citizens or Australian permanent residents and International applicants.

More information

For more information, please contact Brian Oldenburg