EXOTICS, AVIAN AND WILDLIFE CARE

VET3EAW

2018

Credit points: 15

Subject outline


In this subject, students learn how to plan and provide evidence based nursing care for a range of exotic, avian and wildlife species. To deepen their knowledge, students will examine the anatomy, physiology, behaviour, handling, husbandry requirements and common conditions of a range of animal species, including pocket pets (rabbits, rats, guinea pigs, mice and ferrets), birds (covering a range of common species), reptiles,amphibians, fish, and native Australian wildlife (kangaroos, possums, wombats and echidnas). Through a work integrated learning placement, students will plan the specific surgical, clinical and nursing care needs of these patients. Students will examine the relevant legislation, and evaluate its impact on the nursing care approaches required for different species. Students will holistically examine the importance of habitat for wildlife, and work together to plan a response to the needs of vulnerable animal populations following natural disasters, such as fire, flood and drought.


SchoolSchool of Life Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorAnthony Gendall

Available to Study Abroad StudentsNo

Subject year levelYear Level 3 - UG

Exchange StudentsNo

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites Must be admitted into SBVN and have passed VET2IAN and VET2PVN

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsExotic Animal Medicine for the Veterinary Technician, 3rd Ed.PrescribedBonnie Ballard, B & Cheek R (Eds) (2016)Wiley-Blackwell
ReadingsMedicine of Australian MammalsPrescribedVogelnest, L. & Woods, R. (2008)Wiley-Blackwell

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Compare and contrast the anatomy and physiology of a range of exotic, avian and wildlife species

Activities:
Students undertake a range of set readings to learn about the anatomy and physiology of a range of exotic, avian and wildlife species. They are assessed on the anatomical and physiological differences between species in their pre-workshop quizzes. During their workshops, students examine models of a range of animal species (e.g., skeletons) to assist their learning.

02. Compare and contrast the legal, behavioural and husbandry requirements of a range of injured legally owned exotic pets versus injured native wildlife

Activities:
Students are given links to relevant legislation, regarding the care of native wildlife, and the ownership and care of a range of unusual species. The application of this legislation is discussed in a workshop, and student teams then work through a series of case studies, where they apply the relevant legislation, and compare and contrast the legalities regarding the care and ownership of different species. Students also examine how the legal and practical requirement of orphaned wildlife being raised by carers varies to that of domesticated young animals being raised by humans.

03. Research a range of common conditions of exotic, avian and wildlife species

Activities:
Students undertake pre-workshop readings on a range of commonly diagnosed conditions, and these are discussed further during the workshops. Students then select a commonly diagnosed condition of an exotic, avian or wildlife species of personal interest, and undertake a literature review on that condition. Students share their findings with their peers via a presentation.

04. Plan the management of the nursing, surgical and clinical care of exotic, avian and wildlife species undergoing diagnostic, surgical or medical procedures

Activities:
Students undertake readings on the particular surgical, clinical and nursing care requirements for a range of exotic, avian and wildlife species. During workshops, the tutor presents case studies of a range of patients, and the specialized care they required. Student teams are then given a number of case studies, from which they plan the management of the patient's care requirements.

05. Plan the emergency care response required for wildlife in a natural disaster situation

Activities:
Student teams work together to consider the emergency care requirements that a population of wildlife would require following a particular natural disaster eg fire, flood, drought. They will initially list all the requirements, and then generate a plan to help ensure that these are met in a practically and financially viable manner. The teams then present their plans and the reasoning behind them to the class.

06. Examine the importance of habitat on the health and welfare of wildlife

Activities:
Students undertake readings and watch videos related to the importance of habitat on the health and welfare of wild animals. During a workshop, students examine what the impacts are on wildlife, when habitat is reduced or threatened. They then go on to discuss in teams how this knowledge can then be applied to the needs of captive animals, and consider what the challenges are in adequately supplying these needs.

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Epping, 2018, Semester 1, Blended

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorAnthony Gendall

Class requirements

WorkShop Week: 10 - 22
One 5.0 hours workshop every two weeks on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.
"Workshop"

Placement - Off Site Week: 10 - 22
Six 7.5 hours placement - off site per study period on any day including weekend from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via face-to-face.
"WIL Placement. Roster-dependent."

Unscheduled Online Class Week: 10 - 22
One 1.0 hours unscheduled online class per week on any day including weekend from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via online.
"Delivered as reading material, quizzes, video clips."

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
5 x 10 min pre-workshop online quizzes (850 words equivalent)4% each Fortnightly 20 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06
1.5 hour written end of semester examination (1500 words equivalent)Held during examination period30 01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06
Team Poster (400 words equivalent/student)Student teams of 4 students Poster (400 words equivalent/student) Student team selects a natural disaster situation and plans for the emergency care response for a particular group of wildlife in that situation. Team shares their plan, and the reasoning behind it with the class via a poster . 10 02, 03, 05, 06
1200 word Case study written literature review and 5 minute oral presentation (1700 words equivalentStudent to select a commonly diagnosed condition of an exotic, avian or wildlife species that they have observed whilst on placement. Written literature review of the condition - 30%,1200 words Oral presentation on the researched condition and advice on nursing care of these patients - 10%, 5 minutes, 500 words equivalent 40 02, 03, 04