MINDS, BRAINS, AND MACHINES: CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

PHI3MBM

2018

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

What is the mind and what is it made of? Can we say that mind and brain are the same thing? Are mental states, like thoughts and feelings, nothing more than brain states? Can machines be conscious? Do they have a mind? Do they think? Is language necessary for thinking? These and other questions will be the focus of this subject, which introduces students to contemporary philosophy of mind and to the philosophical underpinnings of contemporary cognitive science, psychology and linguistics.

SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorYuri Cath

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 3 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites Any first year level subject (in any discipline)

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjects PHI2MBM

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Identify the underlying issues in a complex problem or controversial debate, analyse their structure and employ appropriate reasoning strategies designed to resolve the problem.

Activities:
Essays, online forums, group and/or individual learning activities in class or online.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Personal and Professional Skills
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills

02. Identify, formulate, analyse and judge the success of standard form and text-based arguments, using appropriate methods of analysis and critical reasoning.

Activities:
Essays, online forums, group and/or individual learning activities in class or online.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills

03. Work collaboratively to assess the merits of philosophical arguments taking into account the different views and starting points of group members.

Activities:
Online forums, group and/or individual learning activities in class or online.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills
Literacies and Communication Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Personal and Professional Skills
Personal and Professional Skills
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills

04. Write a carefully constructed essay in support of a philosophical claim.

Activities:
Essay writing, modelling, feedback on essay.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Literacies and Communication Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Inquiry and Analytical Skills
Personal and Professional Skills
Personal and Professional Skills
Personal and Professional Skills
Personal and Professional Skills
Discipline -Specific Knowledge and Skills

Subject options

Select to view your study options…

Start date between: and    Key dates

Melbourne, 2018, Semester 1, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorYuri Cath

Class requirements

Lecture/Seminar Week: 10 - 22
One 2.0 hours lecture/seminar per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Tutorial Week: 10 - 22
One 1.0 hours tutorial per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via face-to-face.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Essay, 1,800 words40 01, 02, 04
Essay, 2000 words50 01, 02, 04
Online forum contributions 600 words (in total)10 01, 02, 03, 04