HUMAN RIGHTS LAW IN CONTEXT

LAW5HRL

2018

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

Students in this unit study the core elements and fundamental issues in international and Australian human rights law. We analyse the philosophical basis underlying the international human rights framework,and then critique various methods for the enforcement or realisation of human rights at both an international and domestic level.  Students will examine case studies in the areas of civil and political rights, economic, social and cultural rights, and the field of emerging rights, and construct potential solutions to complex human rights problems.  LAW5HRL is the pre-requisite for the internship subject LAW5HRA (Human Rights Advocacy).

SchoolLa Trobe Law School

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorEmma Henderson

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 5 - Masters

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites LAW5PMI LAW5SIN LAW5CSL

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjectsN/A

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Readings

Resource TypeTitleResource RequirementAuthor and YearPublisher
ReadingsInternational Law of Human Rights, Latest EditionPrescribedNolan, Mcbeth and Rice, OUP July 2017Oxford University Press

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Assess and critically analyze the key principles and theories underlying central human rights treaties and frameworks

Activities:
Seminar Exercises Research Assignment Seminar Presentation

02. Interpret and evaluate legislative and international legal instruments in a number of core human rights areas

Activities:
Seminar Exercises Research Assignment Seminar Presentation

03. Utilise specific legal principles and domestic and international instruments to create, defend and communication solutions to complex human rights problems to different audiences

Activities:
Seminar Exercises Research Assignment Seminar Presentation

04. Demonstrate a mastery of academic and professional conventions in completing set tasks both individually and in group work.

Activities:
Annotated Bibliography Research Assignment Seminar Exercises Seminar Presentation

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

City Campus, 2018, Semester 1, Blended

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorEmma Henderson

Class requirements

Seminar Week: 10 - 22
One 2.0 hours seminar per week on weekdays at night from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Unscheduled Online Class Week: 10 - 22
Twelve 0.5 hours unscheduled online class per study period on any day including weekend during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via online.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Annotated Bibliography and Assignment Plan (1500 word equivalent)This feedback is part of the scaffolding of the final assessment task, and gives students plenty of time to course-correct and improve as the semester continues.20 04
Group Seminar Exercises (1000 words equivalent)Students provide advice to different audiences such as government officials, international bodies, victims and NGO clients) so students practice communication at different levels and in different contexts.15 01, 02, 03, 04
Group presentations (1000 word equivalent per presentation)The assessment is designed to ensure that the skills demonstrated in the final presentation is the culmination of all the earlier presentations # in other words, through the feedback process, students engage with and learn from, every presentation and not just their own.15 02, 03
Ministerial briefing paper (2000 word equivalent)This is a Ministerial Briefing paper, which is based on research completed over the semester, but is designed to encourage students to draw conclusions from and propose creative solutions to a self-identified legislative gap. The word limit is based on work place imperatives and requires focus and skill.50 01, 02, 03, 04