ANARCHISTS, TERRORISTS, AND FREEDOM FIGHTERS

HIS2ANA

2018

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

In this subject students explore the origins and historical development of terrorism. From the People's Will to Al Qaeda, we will provide a survey of the most significant movements that have engaged in terror. In the subject we will emphasize the importance of ideas and chart the significance of anarchism, revolutionary socialism, national liberation and religious extremism. Particular attention will be paid to primary texts from influential exponents of violence, including Sergei Nechaev, Frantz Fanon and Carlos Marighela. Students will debate the problems of developing a meaningful definition of terrorism; investigate the ideas and material conditions that have given rise to various forms of political violence; consider the challenge of formulating an effective and just response to terrorist attacks; and locate modern terrorism in a broad, comparative historical perspective.

SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorRoland Burke

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 2 - UG

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites 15 credit points of first year History and another 15 credit points of History or another discipline

Co-requisitesN/A

Incompatible subjects HIS3ATF

Equivalent subjectsN/A

Special conditionsN/A

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. To locate the phenomenon of modern terrorism and insurgency in comparative historical perspective, across a wide range of historical, political, and cultural contexts.

Activities:
This will be done by close analysis of primary texts, which will be discussed and debated in tutorial, and across the lecture program. In the weekly reading, students will be exposed to competing arguments on the meaning of terrorist activity, and encouraged to evaluate their merits and implications in both tutorials and the two essays. Third year students will be expected to undertake a greater depth of research in their assessment, and engage with a wider range of examples.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing
Speaking
Inquiry/ Research
Critical Thinking
Creative Problem-solving

02. To understand the problems of developing a meaningful definition of terrorism, informed by history, philosophy, and law.

Activities:
Assimilation of relevant weekly subject reading, and activist engagement in tutorial debate and dialogue. Written assessment should also be informed by an awareness of the complexity of the problems of definition. Visual texts will be used alongside conventional historical texts in lectures. Third year students will be expected to demonstrate an appreciation for the implications that inhere in particular types of definition.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing
Speaking
Inquiry/ Research
Critical Thinking
Creative Problem-solving
Ethical & Cultural Awareness

03. Demonstrate a comprehension of the ideas that have led to the adoption of terrorism and related forms of violence in a variety of contexts.

Activities:
Deployment of relevant comparative examples in essays, and in tutorial discussion. More broadly, students may identify common themes, patterns, and modes of thought that produce and encourage extremism and political violence. Debate will also be directed to consideration of possible options for reducing, resolving, and countering extremism, engaging students in a realistic exercise of problem solving, with reference to constraints. Third year students will be required to engage with the issue of comparative context in a way that extends beyond generalization and abstraction.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research
Speaking
Writing
Creative Problem-solving
Critical Thinking

04. Capacity to prepare and complete a substantial historical research project, supported by evidence and an awareness of competing arguments and views.

Activities:
The two pieces of summative written assessment place great emphasis on the careful use of historical evidence to support a clear argument, and explicitly discourages unsupported assertion and excessive description. Third year students shall invoke a more diverse range of primary evidence, and frame their arguments with more explicit reference to the historiography and relevant literature.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Writing
Inquiry/ Research
Critical Thinking
Creative Problem-solving
Speaking

05. Evaluate historical questions raised in weekly subject readings and lectures, and to formulate arguments and hypotheses based in evidence and specific examples.

Activities:
This will be demonstrated in the written assessment, which requires a focused response, with reference to the historiography; and in tutorial discussion, where competing views will be analysed and tested.
Related graduate capabilities and elements:
Inquiry/ Research
Writing
Critical Thinking
Speaking
Creative Problem-solving

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Albury-Wodonga, 2018, Semester 1, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorRoland Burke

Class requirements

Lecture Week: 10 - 22
One 2.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Tutorial Week: 10 - 22
One 1.0 hours tutorial per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
One 1500 word reflective essayDetailed in subject guide; involves synthesis of course themes.40 01, 02, 03, 04, 05
One 2000-word research essayDetailed in subject guide; entails preparation of an argument informed by extensive independent research.50 01, 03, 04, 05
One 500-word essay proposal and bibliographyDetailed in subject guide; an preliminary task designed to assist in formulation and development of the essay, and initial familiarization with conventions of history writing and research.10 01, 03, 04, 05

Melbourne, 2018, Semester 1, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorRoland Burke

Class requirements

Lecture Week: 10 - 22
One 2.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Tutorial Week: 10 - 22
One 1.0 hours tutorial per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
One 1500 word reflective essayDetailed in subject guide; involves synthesis of course themes.40 01, 02, 03, 04, 05
One 2000-word research essayDetailed in subject guide; entails preparation of an argument informed by extensive independent research.50 01, 03, 04, 05
One 500-word essay proposal and bibliographyDetailed in subject guide; an preliminary task designed to assist in formulation and development of the essay, and initial familiarization with conventions of history writing and research.10 01, 03, 04, 05

Mildura, 2018, Semester 1, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorRoland Burke

Class requirements

Lecture Week: 10 - 22
One 2.0 hours lecture per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Tutorial Week: 10 - 22
One 1.0 hours tutorial per week on weekdays during the day from week 10 to week 22 and delivered via blended.

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
One 1500 word reflective essayDetailed in subject guide; involves synthesis of course themes.40 01, 02, 03, 04, 05
One 2000-word research essayDetailed in subject guide; entails preparation of an argument informed by extensive independent research.50 01, 03, 04, 05
One 500-word essay proposal and bibliographyDetailed in subject guide; an preliminary task designed to assist in formulation and development of the essay, and initial familiarization with conventions of history writing and research.10 01, 03, 04, 05