DEVELOPMENT AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DST5DAE

2018

Credit points: 15

Subject outline

Relying on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN-SDGs) as a framework, this subject examines the relationship between environment and development. A number of guest speakers, representing multilateral and non-governmental organizations, will introduce students to central issues, including sustainable development, responsible consumption and production, and affordable and clean energy. Particular attention is given to the phenomena of global warming and population growth. Students will also critically evaluate the range of interventions and policy frameworks that have been designed to address environmental problems, including administrative, market-based and community-governance responses. The subject regularly utilizes video sources; and includes perspectives on, and perspectives from, the developing world. It is relevant to students in the social sciences, health sciences and business.


SchoolSchool of Humanities & Social Sciences

Credit points15

Subject Co-ordinatorSheila Scopis

Available to Study Abroad StudentsYes

Subject year levelYear Level 5 - Masters

Exchange StudentsYes

Subject particulars

Subject rules

Prerequisites None

Co-requisites None

Incompatible subjects DST4DAE

Equivalent subjects None

Special conditions None

Graduate capabilities & intended learning outcomes

01. Conduct research, including literature review, and develop an argument

Activities:
Students will prepare a written assignment, in which they are expected to analyze a case study, and engage with relevant academic literature and development reports

02. Present an oral assessment of a key issue in environmental sustainability

Activities:
Students will be required to give a 20 minute oral presentation, in which they present a paper focused on a key case studies relevant to the subject

03. Produce a complex written argument based on academic research and development reports

Activities:
Students will prepare a written assignment, in which they are expected to analyze a case study, and develop an argument, while engaging with relevant literature and development reports

04. Demonstrate knowledge of major theories and concepts associated with environmental interventions

Activities:
Students will participate in seminar discussions and partake in online learning activities

Subject options

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Start date between: and    Key dates

Melbourne, 2018, Semester 2, Day

Overview

Online enrolmentYes

Maximum enrolment sizeN/A

Enrolment information

Subject Instance Co-ordinatorSheila Scopis

Class requirements

Seminar Week: 31 - 43
One 1.0 hours seminar per week on any day including weekend during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via blended.
"Please provide teaching facilities where we could have lectures video-recorded"

Seminar Week: 31 - 43
One 1.0 hours seminar per week on weekdays during the day from week 31 to week 43 and delivered via face-to-face.
"Please provide teaching facilities where we could have lectures video-recorded"

Assessments

Assessment elementComments% ILO*
Case Study Presentation and Seminar Activities (1,000 word equivalent)Review strengths and and weaknesses interventions/framework presented by guest speakers, and demonstrate close engagement with development documents/reports20 02, 04
Critical Case Study Analysis (3,000 words)Develop a written assessment of a contemporary environmental problem from an international development perspective.60 01, 03, 04
Reflective Journals and Seminar Exercises (1,000 word equivalent)Critically reflect on case studies presented by guest speakers20 04