Gene technology research

La Trobe University conducts gene technology research in a safe, secure, ethical and environmentally responsible framework to meet the needs of the national legislative scheme and the Australian community. The Gene Technology Regulator, with support from the Office of the Gene Technology Regulator (OGTR), administrates the national legislative scheme.

La Trobe is an OGTR accredited organisation with an Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) – the La Trobe Institutional Biosafety Committee (LTIBC). The LTIBC performs quality assurance and helps the University meet the requirements of the legislation.

Learn more about the LTIBC.

All research has additional research integrity responsibilities. Find out about Research Integrity at La Trobe.

Gene Technology Act 2000 and Gene Technology Regulations 2001

The Commonwealth Gene Technology Act 2000 (the Act) took effect 21 June 2001 with the objective:

'to protect the health and safety of people, and the environment, by identifying risks posed by or as a result of gene technology, and by managing those risks through regulating certain dealings with genetically modified organisms (GMOs)'.

The Act defines gene technology as:

'any technique for the modification of genes or other genetic material, but does not include:a. sexual reproduction; or
b. homologous recombination (not involving gene technology); or
c. any other technique specified in the regulations.'

The Act, in conjunction with the Gene Technology Regulations 2001 (the Regulations) and corresponding State and Territory legislation, comprises the nationally consistent legislative scheme regulating the use of live and viable GMOs in Australia.

Organisms that are not GMOs

Schedule 1 – Gene Technology Regulations (2001): Regulation 5

1. A mutant organism in which the mutational event did not involve the introduction of any foreign nucleic acid (that is, non-homologous DNA, usually from another species).

2. A whole animal, or a human being, modified by the introduction of naked recombinant nucleic acid (such as a DNA vaccine) into its somatic cells, if the introduced nucleic acid is incapable of giving rise to infectious agents.

3. Naked plasmid DNA that is incapable of giving rise to infectious agents when introduced into a host cell.

6. An organism that results from an exchange of DNA if:
(a) the donor species is also the host species; and
(b) the vector DNA does not contain any heterologous DNA.

7. An organism that results from an exchange of DNA between the donor species and the host species if:
(a) such exchange can occur by naturally occurring processes; and
(b) the donor species and the host species are micro-organisms that: (i) satisfy the criteria in AS/NZS 2243.3:2010 for classification as Risk Group 1; and (ii) are known to exchange nucleic acid by a natural physiological process; and
(c) the vector used in the exchange does not contain heterologous DNA from any organism other than an organism that is involved in the exchange.

Techniques not classified as gene technology

Schedule 1A  – Gene Technology Regulations (2001): Regulation 4.

  1. A natural process, if the process does not involve genetically modified material.
  2. Zygote implantation.
  3. In vitro fertilisation.
  4. Embryo rescue.
  5. Protoplast fusion, including fusion of plant protoplasts.
  6. Fusion of animal cells, or human cells, if the fused cells are unable to form a viable whole animal or human.
  7. Chemical-induced mutagenesis.
  8. Particle radiation-induced mutagenesis.
  9. Electromagenetic radiation-induced mutagenesis.
  10. Somatic cell nuclear transfer, if the transfer does not involve genetically modified material.

Examples of natural processes include conjugation, transduction, transformation and transposon mutagenesis.

What is a genetically modified organism?

  1. An organism that has been modified by gene technology.
  2. An organism that has inherited particular traits from an organism (the initial organism), and those traits occurred in the initial organism because of gene technology.
  3. Anything declared by the Gene Technology Regulations to be to be a GMO, or that belongs to a class of things declared by the Gene Technology Regulations to be GMOs.

A GMO is not:

  1. A human being, if the human being has undergone somatic cell gene therapy.
  2. An organism included in Schedule 1 of the Gene Technology Regulations, or that belongs to a class of organisms declared by Schedule 1 of the Gene Technology Regulations not be GMOs.

What is a dealing?

Types of dealings

The terms 'dealings' or 'deal with', in relation to a GMO, means to:

  • conduct experiments with the GMO
  • make, develop, produce or manufacture the GMO
  • breed the GMO
  • propagate the GMO
  • use the GMO to manufacture a thing that is not the GMO
  • grow, raise or culture the GMO
  • import the GMO
  • transport the GMO
  • dispose of the GMO
  • Possess, supply or use of the GMO for the purposes of, or in the course of, any of the above.

The Act and Regulations describe classes of dealings with GMOs, levels of containment and approval process. Dealings are classified based on the level of risk to the researcher, community and environment and the level of regulatory scrutiny is proportional to the level of risk. In order of risk, dealings are classified as Exempt Dealings, Notifiable Low Risk Dealings (NLRD), Dealings Not Involving Intentional Release (DNIR) and Dealings Involving Intentional Release (DIR). At La Trobe the LTIBC must review all classes of dealings prior to the start of your project, research or activity.

All dealings with GMOs are prohibited by legislation, unless the dealing is:

  1. licensed by the Regulator for contained use or intentional release into the environment
  2. notifiable Low Risk Dealing (NLRD) or exempt dealing
  3. on the Register of GMOs
  4. specified in an Emergency Dealing Determination.

As a general rule, dealings involving fully characterised microorganisms that do not cause disease and basic tissue culture are normally Exempt Dealings. Dealings using fully characterised laboratory GM animals including mice and rats are normally NLRD PC1 and most other dealings including animals, plants or microorganisms are NLRD PC2. If a dealing involves oncogenic or immunomodulatory genes or secretion of infectious or toxic agents this may require a DNIR. A DIR is for controlled release of a GMO. Both DNIR and DIRs are licenced dealings.

Viral vector classifications

Contained dealings with viral vectors can be classified in the DNIR, NLRD, and exempt categories. To correctly classify dealings with viral vectors the OGTR provides guidance documents.

Exempt Dealings

Exempt dealings are described in Schedule 2 of the Regulations and are a category of GMOs assessed as posing a very low risk. Part 1 of Schedule 2 provides a description of exempt dealings while Part 2 lists the host/vector systems for exempt dealings. The only legislative requirement for exempt dealings is that they must not involve an intentional release of a GMO into the environment.

There are no reporting requirements to the Regulator for exempt dealings. At La Trobe University all exempt dealings conducted and contained within La Trobe facilities must be reviewed and approved by the LTIBC prior to commencement. Requests to vary an approved exempt dealing must also be submitted to the LTIBC for review.

Containment

Exempt dealings are not required by the Regulator to be conducted in a certified facility but the OGTR guidance notes on containment of exempt dealings are effectively equivalent to facilities certified to Physical Containment level 1 (PC1). Uncertified PC1 facilities must comply with the Australian/New Zealand Standard, Safety in laboratories, Part 3: Microbiological safety and containment. See La Trobe's internal certification program.

Need more information? The OGTR provides Guidance Notes for the Containment of Exempt Dealings.

Application process

  1. Ensure the dealing meets the classification criteria listed in Schedule 2 of the Regulations.
  2. Download a La Trobe University Exempt Dealing Application Form (PDF 1.2MB) and save a copy to your computer.
  3. Complete all sections on the application form. Enter 'not applicable' if a question or section does not apply to your dealing.
  4. Transport, storage and disposal of GMOs must comply with the Guidelines for the Transport, Storage and Disposal of GMOs.
  5. Review your application. Incomplete applications and applications with insufficient details will be returned to the Chief Investigator prior to review.

The completed application must be submitted electronically to biosafety@latrobe.edu.au from the Chief Investigator's La Trobe University email account. This method enables legal receipt of applications without a signature.

Applications are assessed in order of receipt. A sub-committee of the LTIBC will review applications out-of-session. Applications reviewed out-of-session require ratification by the full Committee.

Work cannot commence until written approval is received from the LTIBC.

Notifiable Low Risk Dealings (NLRD)

Notifiable Low Risk Dealings (NLRDs) are described in Schedule 3 Part 1 and Part 2 of the Regulations. NLRDs are a category of GMOs assessed as posing a low risk to people and the environment, provided the risk is properly managed.

As a requirement of the Regulations, NLRDs must be:

The Regulations require all NLRDs are reported to the Regulator. The LTIBC must provide a record of assessment for each NLRD assessed. As a condition of approval, the University requires Chief Investigators of NLRDs to submit an Annual Progress Report to the LTIBC by the last working day of January.

Containment

NLRDs must be conducted within an appropriate facility type (for example an animal, laboratory or plant facility) certified to either Physical Containment Level 1 (PC1), level 2 (PC2) or level 3 (PC3). The type of facility and level of containment required depends on the dealing. La Trobe University has PC1 and PC2 certified facilities but does not have Physical Containment Level 3 facilities.

Need more information? The OGTR provides explanatory information, guidelines and checklists for all facility types and level of containment.

Application process

  1. Ensure the dealing meets the classification criteria listed in Schedule 3 Part 1 and Part 2 of the Regulations.
  2. Download a La Trobe University Notifiable Low Risk Dealing Application Form (PDF 3.4MB) and save a copy to your computer.
  3. If many GMOs are involved please use the Appendix table (Excel 118KB) to record all required information
  4. Complete all sections on the application form. Enter 'not applicable' if a question or section does not apply to your dealing.
  5. Transport, storage and disposal of GMOs must comply with the Guidelines for the Transport, Storage and Disposal of GMOs.
  6. Review your application. Incomplete applications and applications with insufficient details will be returned to the Chief Investigator prior to review.
  7. The completed application must be submitted electronically to biosafety@latrobe.edu.au from the Chief Investigator's La Trobe University email account. This method enables legal receipt of applications without a signature.

Applications are assessed in order of receipt. A LTIBC sub-committee will review applications out-of-session. Applications reviewed out-of-session require ratification by the full Committee.

Work cannot commence until you receive written approval from the LTIBC.

Dealings Not involving Intentional Release (DNIR)

Dealings with GMOs in contained facilities which do not meet the criteria for classification as Exempt Dealings or Notifiable Low Risk Dealings and do NOT involve an intentional release of GMOs into the environment. DNIRs are higher risk dealings than NLRDs.

DNIRs must be licensed by the Regulator. The kind of dealings classified as DNIRs are described in Schedule 3 Part 3 of the Regulations.

Contained dealings with viral vectors can be classified in the DNIR, NLRD, and exempt categories. To correctly classify dealings with viral vectors the OGTR has provided the following guides:

Application process

  1. Read the Licence Application & Assessment Process information provided by the OGTR.
  2. Ensure the dealing meets the classification criteria listed in Schedule 3 Part 3 of the Regulations.
  3. Ensure dealings involving viral vectors meet the correct classification criteria.
  4. Download an OGTR Application Form - Dealings Not involving Intentional Release (DNIR) and save a copy to your computer.
  5. The completed application and all supporting documentation must be submitted electronically to biosafety@latrobe.edu.au from the Chief Investigator's La Trobe University email account.
  6. DNIR licence applications must be reviewed and supported by the LTIBC. The LTIBC will forward reviewed and supported licence applications to the Regulator.

Evaluation of a licence application by the Regulator can take up to 90 working days. Work cannot commence the Regulator has issued a licence.

Dealings involving Intentional Release (DIR)

Dealings with GMOs outside contained facilities and involving an intentional release into the environment are classified as DIR.

DIRs must be licensed by the Regulator and are included on the GMO Record. The evaluation process of DIR licence applications is comprehensive and involves the preparation of a risk assessment and risk management plan (RARMP).

Application process

  1. Read the Licence Application & Assessment Process information provided by the OGTR.
  2. Download an OGTR Application Form - Dealings involving Intentional Release (DIR) and save a copy to your computer.
  3. The completed application and all supporting documentation must be submitted electronically to biosafety@latrobe.edu.au from the Chief Investigator's La Trobe University email account.
  4. DIR licence applications must be reviewed and supported by the LTIBC. The LTIBC will forward reviewed and supported licence applications to the Regulator.

Evaluation of a licence application by the Regulator can take up to 255 working days. Work cannot commence the Regulator has issued a licence.

Variation to an approved dealing

The LTIBC will consider an application to vary an approved dealing, provided the request only involves:

  1. Minor changes to procedures
  2. Extension of project duration (up to 5 years)
  3. Change to host-vector system/appendix
  4. Change to personnel
  5. Change to facility
  6. Change to funding details
  7. Change to ethics number

The LTIBC sub-committee will review variation applications for changes to procedure and host/vector systems/appendices out-of-session. The Senior Biosafety Officer will review variation applications for changes to personnel and facilities out-of-session. Variation applications that alter the scope of the original proposal assessed and approved by the LTIBC will not be reviewed as a variation and will require the submission of a new application. The Regulations do not provide scope for variations to the record of assessment (RoA) of dealings assessed as NLRDs, however changes can be made to appendices that are assessed by LTIBC to be within the scope of that described in the RoA using a variation application. A variation application to a dealing assessed by the LTIBC as a NLRD will require a new assessment if the variation changes any details recorded in the original RoA.

The LTIBC must review requests to vary a licensed dealing (DNIR and DIR) prior to the application being lodged with the Regulator.

Application process

  • Ensure the variation meets the criteria for consideration.
  • Download a LTIBC Variation Form (750KB) and save a copy to your computer.
  • Complete all sections on the application form. Enter 'not applicable' if a question or section does not apply to your dealing.
  • Transport, storage and disposal of GMOs must comply with the Guidelines for the Transport, Storage and Disposal of GMOs.
  • Review your application. Incomplete applications and applications within insufficient details will be returned to the Chief Investigator prior to review.
  • The completed application must be submitted electronically to biosafety@latrobe.edu.au from the Chief Investigator's La Trobe University email account. This method enables legal receipt of applications without a signature.

Applications are assessed in order of receipt. A LTIBC sub-committee will review applications out-of-session. Applications reviewed out-of-session require ratification by the full committee.

The variation to the project cannot commence until you receive written approval from the LTIBC and/or Regulator.

Annual reports, final reports and externally approved projects

The following reports are a condition of approval to conduct gene technology dealings at La Trobe University.

Annual progress reports

All NLRD, DNIR and DIR projects assessed by the LTIBC must complete and submit an annual progress report on or before the last working day of January for the previous calendar year (1 January - 31 December).

Annual Progress Reports are reviewed by the LTIBC and assist the University to identify any concerns, difficulties or incidents researchers have experienced. The report is a condition of LTIBC approval and part of the University's ongoing monitoring role. Failure to submit an Annual Progress Report may result in the suspension or cancellation of LTIBC approval.

Annual reporting process

  • Download a LTIBC Annual Progress Report [PDF 2.7MB] and save a copy to your computer.
  • Complete all sections on the report form. Enter 'not applicable' if a question or section does not apply to your dealing.
  • Review your report. Incomplete reports will be returned to the Chief Investigator prior to review.
  • The completed report must be submitted electronically to biosafety@latrobe.edu.au from the Chief Investigator's La Trobe University email account. This method enables legal receipt of reports without a signature.
  • Annual reports are due on or prior to the last working day of January, reviewed by the LTIBC at the February meeting and included in the Annual LTIBC report to the Research and Graduate Studies Committee.

Final reports

Final Reports are required following the expiration of a project. Final Reports are reviewed by the LTIBC and kept by La Trobe University as an official record from the project Chief Investigator regarding the outcome of all GMOs used or produced during the approval period. Information detailing the transportation of GMOs to another facility or institution, the storage and/or disposal of GMOs is essential. Final Reports are due no later than three months after the project completion date and are a condition of LTIBC approval.

Final reporting process

  • Download a Final Report (PDF 2.5MB) and save a copy to your computer.
  • Complete all sections on the report form. Enter 'not applicable' if a question or section does not apply to your dealing.
  • Review your report. Incomplete reports will be returned to the Chief Investigator.
  • The completed report must be submitted electronically to biosafety@latrobe.edu.au from the Chief Investigator's La Trobe University email account. This method enables legal receipt of reports without a signature.

Download the application for multi-centre research with external chief investigator [PDF 513 KB]

OGTR Certified Physical Containment Facilities

Notifiable Low Risk Dealings and contained Licenced Dealings must be conducted in OGTR certified physical containment facilities by trained and experienced personnel. All facilities used for housing GM animals or GM plants need to be certified. Certified facilities are identifiable by the mustard (PC1) or orange (PC2) OGTR certified facility signage and purple or yellow biohazard sticker on all entrances to the facilities. The level of containment and type of facility required for your genetic manipulation work will depend on the kind of dealing(s) you undertake.

For La Trobe internal certification of laboratories for Exempt Dealings and non-GM research please refer to the Biosafety home page.

Locate an OGTR certified PC1 or PC2 facility at La Trobe (PDF 146KB).

Physical Containment Level 1 (PC1)

Physical containment level 1 (PC1) is the lowest level of containment certified by the OGTR. If your work meets the criteria for a Notifiable Low Risk Dealing suitable for at least PC1 containment, your work must be conducted in a facility with at least OGTR PC1 certification. PC1 facilities are identifiable by the mustard coloured OGTR signage and biological hazard symbol on the facility entrances.

PC1 facility and fitting requirements vary depending on the type of dealing to be contained. For example, a PC1 facility dealing only with GM animals must screen any openings in the facility with rodent proof mesh, whereas this is not a requirement in a facility only dealing with GM micro-organisms. The OGTR provides PC1 guidelines containing PC1 certification requirements.

PC1 facilities at La Trobe University are located within the School of Molecular Sciences and School of Psychology and Public Health (Health Sciences). The Central Animal House is a certified PC1 facility with specific areas certified to PC2 Animal Facility standards.

All staff must also be suitably trained in PC1 requirements via successful completion of the Working with Recombinant DNA training module.

Annual inspections are not required for certified PC1 facilities for OGTR Certification; however, the committee will conduct bi-annual inspections of PC1 facilities and personnel working in the facility must continue to comply with certification conditions.

Exempt Dealings must be conducted in facilities that at least meet the Australian New Zealand Standards 2982:2010 and 2243:3:2010. La Trobe has an internal certification program through the LTIBC that verifies laboratories are compliant with the Standards. Please contact biosafety@latrobe.edu.au for any questions.

Physical Containment Level 2 (PC2)

Physical containment level 2 (PC2) is for GM dealings that present a moderate potential risk to animals, plants, humans or the environment and is the most common level of containment certified by the OGTR at La Trobe University. If your work meets the criteria for a Notifiable Low Risk Dealing suitable for at least PC2 containment your work must be conducted in a facility with at least OGTR PC2 certification. PC2 facilities are identifiable by the orange coloured OGTR signage on the facility entrances. The requirements and conditions imposed on PC2 facilities and personnel working within the facilities are more stringent than PC1. As a condition of certification, all PC2 facilities are inspected annually by the GMSC to ensure certification conditions and behavioural requirements continue to be met.

La Trobe University currently holds PC2 Laboratory, Plant, Invertebrate and Animal Facility certifications. PC2 facilities are located within the Biochemistry and Microbiology Departments, the Central Animal House, LIMS 1 and the Research and Development Park.

For research involving or potentially involving Risk Group 2 organisms that do not include genetically modified organisms, La Trobe University has an internal certification program through the LTIBC that verifies laboratories are compliant with the Australian New Zealand Standards 2982:2010 and 2243:3:2010. Please contact the Senior Biosafety Officer at biosafety@latrobe.edu.au for any questions regarding certification.

Annual inspections of PC2 facilities

The LTIBC conducts annual inspections of all PC2 facilities to ensure they comply with certification conditions. A facility manual is issued to all PC2 facilities to assist in maintaining relevant records and will be a single reference point for students, staff, LTIBC members and OGTR auditors. All staff must also be suitably trained in PC2 requirements via successful completion of the Working with Recombinant DNA training module. Facilities that fail to remain compliant with certification conditions risk suspension or surrender of certification. OGTR inspectors may inspect certified facilities without prior notice.

Annual inspection checklists used at La Trobe University are below.

PC2 facility manuals

The following information should be included in the facility manual and available for inspection by the LTIBC or OGTR auditors:

  1. OGTR Guidelines for Certification, Guidelines for the Transport, Storage and Disposal of GMOs and LTU's GMO Procedures.
  2. Copies of any exemptions or variations to conditions of certification approved by the Regulator.
  3. Authorised personnel list.
  4. Training records for authorised personnel such as the Working with Recombinant DNA module and any additional training required to work in the facility or conduct a specific type of dealing.
  5. Copies of all NLRDs and DNIRs conducted in the facility and LTIBC or OGTR approval letters.
  6. Copies of DNIR licence conditions and any variations authorised by the Regulator.
  7. For DNIRs, signed and dated records of all personnel informed of the licence conditions and any subsequent variations.
  8. Backflow risk assessment for the facility if backflow devices not installed. Note assessments should be reviewed when new GMOs are to be used in the facility.
  9. Maintenance and testing records for all facility safety equipment such as eyewash stations, safety showers, biosafety cabinets and autoclaves.
  10. Records for pest control strategies in place. For example records showing when rodent or insect bait stations are changed.

Applying for new OGTR certifications or suspending or surrendering certifications

OGTR Certification of a facility

Legislation requires certain dealings with GMOs must be conducted within physical containment facilities. Guidelines provided by the Gene Technology Regulator for specified physical containment levels are aligned as closely as possible to the physical containment levels described in the Australian/New Zealand Standard 2243.3 Safety in laboratories Part 3: Microbiological safety and containment.

For research involving or potentially involving Risk Group 1 or Risk Group 2 organisms that do not include genetically modified organisms, La Trobe University has an internal certification program through the LTIBC that verifies laboratories are compliant with the Australian New Zealand Standards 2982:2010 and 2243:3:2010. Please contact the Senior Biosafety Officer at biosafety@latrobe.edu.au for any questions regarding La Trobe's internal certification or external OGTR certification.

Do you require explanatory information on the OGTR Guidelines for Certification of Physical Containment Facilities?

Process for certification

  1. Download the OGTR certification requirements and checklist for the facility type and level of containment.
  2. Ensure the facility meets the OGTR certification requirements.
  3. Ensure the facility records and personnel training records are current and available for inspection.
  4. Contact the LTIBC (biosafety@latrobe.edu.au) to organise a facility inspection.
  5. The facility manager/supervisor must be present during inspections to answer any questions inspectors may have and a researcher intending to conduct dealings in the facility is advised to also be present.
  6. Obtain a detailed floor plan for the facility and provide a copy to the Senior Biosafety Officer.
  7. Any facility issues requiring addressing in order for the facility to meet regulatory requirements will be provided to the facility manager/supervisor by the Senior Biosafety Officer. Written notification must be provided by the facility manager/supervisor once issues are rectified and if necessary a follow up inspection will be scheduled.
  8. The Senior Biosafety Officer will prepare a certification application and submit it on behalf of La Trobe University to the Regulator for consideration following authorisation by the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Research).

The Regulator has 90 working days upon receipt of an application to decide whether to grant certification. If additional information is required this period can be extended. Dealings cannot commence until certification is granted and OGTR signage and biohazard signs are affixed to the facility entrances. The Senior Biosafety Officer keeps an electronic copy of the certification and signage and originals provided to the facility manager/supervisor.

Following certification, personnel working in the facility must be made aware of and comply with the ongoing conditions of certification.

Suspension or surrender of certifications

The Regulator may suspend or cancel a facility certification if there are reasonable grounds that a condition of the certification has been breached. La Trobe as certification holder can also submit written requests to suspend or surrender (cancel) facility certifications.

To suspend or surrender a certification contact the Senior Biosafety Officer (biosafety@latrobe.edu.au). The manager or supervisor of a facility no longer requiring certification must provide in writing:

  1. Details specifying the request (to suspend or surrender the certification), certification number and location (Room number and building).
  2. Confirmation that all dealings have ceased within the facility.
  3. All GMOs have been decontaminated, destroyed, removed or appropriately stored according to the Regulator's Guidelines for Transport, Storage and Disposal of Genetically Modified Organisms 2011.
  4. Information on what action(s) was taken to transport, store or dispose of the GMOs contained within the facility.
  5. Other authorisations, such as NLRDs in this facility have been appropriately varied or re-assessed by the LTIBC.
  6. Any other organisations or persons authorised to use the facility, who are not the certification holder, have been advised of the intention for the certification to be surrendered.
  7. Confirmation that the facility has been fully decontaminated.
  8. Confirmation that any stickers issued by the Regulator will or have been removed from the facility.
  9. When the surrender of certification is to take effect.

Training

The 'Working with Recombinant DNA' training module is designed for personnel who work with GMOs and/or require access to OGTR certified facilities at La Trobe. All personnel listed on GMO dealings must complete this module. Personnel who do not conduct research involving gene technology, but work within or require access to OGTR certified physical containment facilities must also complete the module.

The module is available online. To activate a new account:

  1. Log in to Ethics Online
  2. Select 'Course registration'.
  3. Complete the requested details. The email address can be your La Trobe email address or a personal email address. The password does not have to correspond with your La Trobe password.
  4. Select 'Register'.
  5. An activation email will be sent to your selected email address. This email contains your username and password.

Once your account is activated you will be able to log on to the Ethics Online site and complete the module. Provide a copy of your completion certificate to the:

  • Senior Biosafety Officer (biosafety@latrobe.edu.au)
  • supervisor of the NLRD or licensed dealing you are associated with
  • manager of each certified facility you require access to.

You must also place a copy of your completion certificate in the facility certification folder.

To ensure you are informed, prepared and trained before starting work in a laboratory, La Trobe Health and Safety provides a variety of training modules and information sessions are provided throughout the year. These modules include:

  • manual handling
  • laboratory safety
  • chemical safety
  • radiation safety
  • noise and hearing conservation.

A list of scheduled training courses is available on the Health, Safety and Wellbeing training webpage.