Staff profile

Dr Brad J

Dr Brad J Wright

Senior Lecturer

College of Science, Health and Engineering

School of Psychology and Public Health

Department of Psychology and Counselling

George Singer Building , room 412, Melbourne (Bundoora)

Research centres

Centre for Sport and Social Impact

Qualifications

BA Deakin, GradDip, PhD LaTrobe.

Role

Academic

Area of study

Psychology

Brief profile

Dr Brad Wright conducts research in the area of performance psychology (organizational & sport psychology). Dr Wright has researched the links between occupational stress (individual and organisational factors) and ensuing ill-health with numerous large organisations by focussing on pre-clinical indices of stress and ill-health (immune, cardiovascular and hormonal systems).

His research interests are broad and include areas of Performance and Health Psychology. He is also interested in Psychophysiology and Research Methods and Statistics.

 

Teaching units

Brad is responsible for co-ordinating Abnormal Clinical & Health Psychology (PSY2ACH) and Psychological Research Methods (PSY2PRM) and teaches in  2nd, 3rd, 4th, and postgraduate units of the course.

Recent publications

Eddy, P., Wertheim, E., Hale, M.W., & Wright, B.J. (2017). A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effort-reward imbalance model of workplace stress and HPA axis measures of stress. Psychosomatic Medicine. (in press).

Landolt, K.L.,  O’Halloran, P., Hale, M.W., Horan, B., Kinsella, G., Kingsley, M.,  & Wright, B.J. (2017): Identifying the sources of stress and rewards in a group of Australian apprentice jockeys, Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, DOI: 10.1080/2159676X.2017.1340329

Hodge, B., Wright, B.J., & Bennett, P. (2017). Increasing student engagement and reducing exhaustion through the provision of demanding but well resourced training. Journal of Further and Higher Education. (in press).

Landolt, K., O’Donnell, E., Hazi, A., Dragano, N., & Wright, B. J. (2017). An experimental examination of the effort-reward imbalance model of occupational stress: Increased financial reward is related to reduced stress physiology. Biological Psychology, 125, 121-129.

Wright, B. J., O'Halloran, P. D., & Stukas, A. A. (2016). Enhancing Self-Efficacy and Performance: An Experimental Comparison of Psychological Techniques. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 87(1), 36-46.

Rich, S. A., Hanna, S., & Wright, B. J. (2016). Simply Satisfied: The Role of Psychological Need Satisfaction in the Life Satisfaction of Voluntary Simplifiers. Journal of Happiness Studies, 1-17.

Eddy, P., Heckenberg, R., Wertheim, E., Kent, S., & Wright, B.J. (2016). A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effort-reward imbalance model of workplace stress with indicators of immune function. Journal of Psychosomatic Research.

Hodge, B., Wright, B.J. & Bennett, P.C. (2016).Does Academic Training Change Intentions? Drawing upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour to Improve Academic Performance. International Journal of Training Research.

O’Donnell, E, Landolt, K., Hazi, A., Dragano, N., & Wright, B.J. (2015). An experimental study of the job demand-control model with measures of heart rate variability and salivary alpha-amylase: Evidence of increased stress responses to increased break autonomy, Psychoneuroendocrinology, 51, 24-34.

Wright, B.J., O'Brien, S., Hazi, A., Kent, S. (2015). Increased systolic blood pressure reactivity to acute stress is related with better self-reported health. Scientific Reports. 4, Article number:6882 doi:10.1038/srep06882.

Radler, M.E., Wright, B.J., Walker, F.R., Hale, M.W., Kent, S. (2015) Calorie restriction increases lipopolysaccharide-induced neuropeptide Y immunolabelling and reduces microglial cell area in the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus. Neuroscience, 285, 236-247.

Wright, B. J., Galtieri, N., & Fell, M. (2014). Non-adherence to prescribed home rehabilitation exercises for musculoskeletal injuries: The role of the patient-practitioner relationship. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 46, 153- 158.

Phillips, K., Wright, B. J., & Kent, S. (2014). Irritable bowel syndrome and symptom severity: Evidence of negative attention bias, diminished vigour, and autonomic dysregulation. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 17, 17-19.

Bathman, L., Almond, J., Hazi, A., & Wright, B. J. (2013). Effort-reward imbalance at work and pre-clinical biological indices of ill-health: The case for salivary immunoglobulin A. Brain, Behavior & Immunity, 33, 74-79. http://0dx.doi.org.alpha2.latrobe.edu.au/10.1016/j.bbi.2013.05.010

Wright, B. J., & O’Halloran, P. D. (2013). Perceived Success, auditory feedback and mental imagery: What best predicts improved efficacy and motor performance? Research Quarterly for Exercise & Sport, 84, 139-146.

Philips, K., Wright, B., Kent, S. (2013) Psychosocial predictors of Irritable Bowel Syndrome diagnosis and symptom severity. Journal of Psychosomatic Research 75: 467-474

Craig, H., & Wright, B. J. (2012). Nonadherence to prophylactic medication: Attitudes towards doctors a strong predictor. Australian Family Physician, 41(10), 815-818.

Craig, H., & Wright, B. (2012). Non-adherence to prophylactic medication. Reply. Australian Family Physician, 42(1-2), 8-8.

Wright, B. J. (2011). Effort-reward imbalance is associated with salivary immunoglobulin A and cortisol secretion in disability workers. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 53(3), 308-312.

Wright, B. J. (2008). Comparing the Job Strain and Job Demand- Control-Support models in direct-care disability workers: Support for Support. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 50, 316-323.

Wright, B. J. (2004). Book review: Health and Human Behaviour, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 28 (2), 193.

Sparrow, W. A., & Wright, B. J. (1993). Effect of physical exercise on the performance of cognitive tasks. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 77, 675-679.

Published Conference Abstracts:

Wright, B.J., O’Donnell, E., & Landolt, K. (2014). An experimental investigation of the effort-reward imbalance model with measures of salivary alpha amylase and continuously recorded heart rate variability. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology book of proceedings, p.312.

Wright, B.J., Landolt, K., & O’Donnell, E. (2014). An experimental investigation of the job-demand-control model with measures of salivary alpha amylase and continuously recorded heart rate variability. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology book of proceedings, p.233

Wright, B.J., & Bathman, L.M. (2012). Stress in Australian dairy farmers: Effort-reward imbalance is associated with morning cortisol and salivary immunoglobulin A concentrations. European Academy of Occupational Health Psychology book of proceedings, p.274.

Wright, B.J. (2009). Success, positive feedback and imagery: What best predicts performance? BASES Annual Conference 25th Anniversary, Book of Abstracts’ p.149-150.