Saving the nation's knees

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Two knee injuries, one PhD

Two knee injuries, one PhD

Playing sport, Brooke Howells has had eight broken arms and two ACL knee injuries. Now, she’s researching the effects of knee surgery.

Our researchers have found that in people under 20, one in three who’ve had ACL reconstruction surgery will suffer a second injury within five years. That can have a devastating psychological effect on young people, who naturally expect to be active for much longer.

La Trobe’s Dr Kate Webster is at the forefront of research to reduce ACL injuries. They’re delivering benefits for individuals and sporting communities worldwide by tackling the psychological impact of ACL injury in young people.

To determine the extent of the problem, Dr Webster’s team has developed a ‘Return to Sport after Injury’ scale. The scale helps the team understand the psychology surrounding ACL injury and the willingness of patients to return to sport, measuring confidence and emotional responses such as anxiety.

Saving the nation's knees

Dr Kate Webster tackles the impact and prevention of ACL injuries in young people.

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Exercise science research

Our collaborative centre leads the way in sport and exercise medicine research.

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Sport research

Research into sport, exercise and rehabilitation forms one of our 5 research focus areas.

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The ACL is the knee's main stabilising ligament.
The ACL is the knee's main stabilising ligament.
ACL injuries usually occur in high-pivot sports.
ACL injuries usually occur in high-pivot sports.
We're researching ways to prevent ACL injuries
We're researching ways to prevent ACL injuries
and minimise psychological impact
and minimise psychological impact
to benefit the welfare of individuals
to benefit the welfare of individuals
and society by reducing costs.
and society by reducing costs.