How is evidence actually used in policy making? A new framework from a global DFID programme

How is evidence actually used in policy making? A new framework from a global DFID programme

Andrea recommends a guest post on Duncan Green’s blog by David Rinnert and Liz Brower from DfID on how evidence alone does not lead to improved development outcomes, and what the lessons from DFiD’s Building Capacity to Use Research Evidence (BCURE) program can contribute to improved development outcomes.


Rinnert and Brower argue that we need to better understand politics and incentive structures in government organisations when promoting evidence uptake, and that, “Even if individual or organisational capacity exists, evidence may remain unused if groups with sufficient bargaining power lack incentives to improve policy outcomes. Promoting the use of evidence thus requires an in-depth understanding of the political economy, and a politically savvy implementation approach.” They found that BCURE was most successful when it helped coordinate between large amount of existing research organisations and projects, rather than creating new structures or mechanisms.


For Andrea, this post points to the importance of understanding how policy is actually made in Papua New Guinea, rather than how people think it should be made. This is an area of potential research that the team at La Trobe are interested in.

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