Radical ideas for online learning

Radical Ideas for online learning

Version 1.0, May 2014

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Introduction

Learning technologies can be potentially transformative, allowing an array of new interactions between students, teachers and resources. The constructive alignment of learning resources, activities and assessments with the best use of educational technologies is a key component of student success – the best course design is driven not by the application of technologies, but by pedagogical considerations. After you have clearly determined your intended learning outcomes, and how these will be assessed, this toolkit will help you identify the most appropriate learning technologies and integrate these into your courses.

I. Learning resources

 Learning Resource

You might like to...

Spoken content
(lecture)

Audiovisual and multimedia resources

Text- and image-based resources

Narrated walkthroughs and digital stories

Interactive games

Playlists, pin boards, galleries, glossaries and social bookmarking

 App builders

 

II. Activities and Interaction

Activity

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Learning through acquisition, assimilation and enquiry

Reading, listening and viewing

  • Conduct a seminar or workshop online using Blackboard Collaborate
  • Publish an interactive eBook using Creatavist or iBook using iBooks Author
  • Provide links to prescribed readings, journal articles, websites, video- and audio materials, presented as a narrated walkthrough, with guided questions
  • Use regular blogs (such as WordPress) or e-portfolios (such as PebblePad, Behance, or LinkedIn) to encourage student reflection
  • Create a narrated game using the hypertext tool Twine
  • Curate an online module, playlist or gallery
  • Students can create a mind map using Mindmup or iThoughts

Learning through communication, discussion, interaction, collaboration and group work

Synchronous and asynchronous collaboration

Learning through reflection

Learning through experience

Learning through production

  • Use surveys (Socrative, PollDaddy, SurveyMonkey), in-class or online voting (Poll Everywhere, Tricider), or quizzes (Peerwise)
  • Use blogs or e-portfolios to encourage student reflection
  • Have students write and submit reports, papers, essays or case studies online – collaboratively or individually
  • Have students co-author an interactive eBook or iBook
  • Have students produce a video or audio essay and submit this via YouTube, Vimeo or Soundcloud
  • Students can construct role-play scenarios or simulations using the hypertext tool Twine
  • Alternately, scenarios or simulations can be recorded and submitted via YouTube, Vimeo or Soundcloud
  • Performances or exhibitions can me recorded and submitted via YouTube, Vimeo or Soundcloud

III. Assessments and feedback

Assessment type

You might like to...

Essays, papers, reports, and case studies

  • Students can write and submit reports, papers, essays or case studies online – collaboratively or individually – using Moodle Assignment
  • Students could author or co-author an interactive eBook or iBook
  • Students might collaborate on a wiki to write a report or case study

Writing

  • Students could author or co-author an interactive eBook or iBook
  • Students might collaborate on a wiki to write a short story
  • Students can write their own "choose your own adventure"-style narratives using the hypertext tool Twine

Reflection and peer review

  • You can use blogs or e-portfolios encourage student reflection on learning
  • Asking students to publish and share a weekly blog post on their studies or readings can greatly enhance both engagement, reflection and interaction
  • Students can conduct a peer review using Praze

Multimedia

  • Students might produce a video or audio essay and submit this via YouTube, Vimeo or Soundcloud
  • Practical skills can be assessed by requiring students to record a basic instructional or demonstration video
  • Students can construct their own role-play scenarios or simulations using the hypertext tool Twine
  • Alternately, scenarios or simulations can be recorded and submitted via YouTube, Vimeo or Soundcloud
  • Students can curate their own online module, create an playlist, curate a photographic essay or gallery, create a pin board or notice board
  • Performances or exhibitions for assessment can me recorded and submitted via YouTube, Vimeo or Soundcloud

Group work

  • Group work can be assessed using collaboration on wikis, eBooks or iBooks, or recorded presentations (video, audio, slideshow or screencast)
  • Students can curate their own online module, create an online playlist, curate a photographic essay or gallery, create a pin board or notice board
  • Students can conduct a peer review using Praze or Moodle Workshop

Quizzes, tests

and exams

  • Quizzes and texts (multiple-choice, short answer, etc.) can be conducted online using platforms such as Peerwise or Moodle Quiz
  • Exams can be conducted online, and can incorporate a mixture of question types as well as different interactive multimedia (video, audio, images, etc.)

Feedback

  • Written feedback can be provided on word documents, using the track changes function in Microsoft Word, or in simple online forms
  • Audio feedback can easily be provided using platforms such as Soundcloud or Voicethread
  • Some types of assessment tasks can be set up to be self-correcting, such as simple multiple-choice and short-answer quizzes, or in more complex ways using choice-based online games
  • Badges and microcredit can also be used to leverage students' natural desire for competition and achievement – check out OpenBadges

The learning resources, activities and assessments above are based on Diane Laurillard's Conversational Model, adapted by Allison Littlejohn and Chris Pegler in Preparing for Blended e-Learning (New York: Routledge, 2009).

Author
Dr Stephen Abblitt
Educational Designer, Radical Learning Project, La Trobe University
E: e.abblitt@latrobe.edu.au | W: http://www.radlablatrobe.wordpress.com


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

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