Dr Miriam

Dr Miriam Bankovsky

Senior Lecturer & Australian Research Council DECRA fellow

College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce

Humanities and Social Sciences

Department of Politics and Philosophy

SS 314, Melbourne (Bundoora)

Qualifications

BA with honours in philosophy (ANU 2002), DEA/ Masters II (Paris-X 2006), PhD (Paris-X 2009) and (UNSW 2009).

Role

Academic

Membership of professional associations

Australasian Society of Continental Philosophy, Australian Political Studies Association, Australian Society for Heterodox Economists, History of Economic Thought Society of Australia, FEAST-France

Area of study

International Relations
Philosophy
Politics

Brief profile

Miriam Bankovsky is a Senior Lecturer and Australian Research Council DECRA fellow, in Politics at La Trobe University (Twitter: @MiriamBankovsky and https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Miriam_Bankovsky). She recently received the Australasian Association of Philosophy's "Annette Baier Prize" for her article on "Excusing Economic Envy."

Unified by a sustained interest in socio-economic justice, Miriam's research crosses three disciplines (philosophy, politics and economics), and two philosophical sub-disciplines (continental and analytic). With a French-Australian Cotutelle PhD in philosophy (2009), Miriam's work initially focused on analytic and continental conceptions of justice in a broadly Kantian tradition. Now an Australian Research Council DECRA fellow, Miriam’s current project extends her plural philosophical approach into economics.

Her current work is a manuscript provisionally entitled The Family, Ethics and Economics: An Unorthodox History. For much of the history of Western political thought (from Aristotle, through medieval Christianity, and into the Enlightenment and Romantic periods), the family has been conceptualised as the origin of the State and the motor of a progress that was both ethical and economic. From the late nineteenth century onwards, orthodox economists began to explicitly distinguish their science from ethical and philosophical reflection, reducing familial behaviour to a function of an individual’s rational choice over a set of preferences. However, the research shows that the ethical agnosticism of the orthodox New Household Economics cannot be sustained, for ethical judgments comprise its unacknowledged backdrop, revealing much about how how modern liberal democracies implicitly conceptualise the family-state and family-economy nexus.

Prior to this work, Miriam published Perfecting Justice in Rawls, Habermas and Honneth: A Deconstructive Perspective (Hardback Continuum 2012, Paperback Bloomsbury 2013), and, with Dr Alice Le Goff (University of Paris V), she co-edited Recognition Theory and Contemporary French Moral and Political Philosophy: Re-opening the Dialogue (Manchester UP 2012 and CNRS Editions Alpha, Paris 2012).

Work in progress

With Dr Tim Thornton and Emeritus Professor John E. King, Miriam is co-authoring a comparison of the household economics of Alfred Marshall and Gary Becker, on the topics of marriage, intra-familial resource distribution (or production), human capital investment in children, and inheritance. She is also writing up a paper on civil disobedience, which draws on her previous work on Rawls's political philosophy.

She currently has two further articles under review. The first identifies the unacknowledged ethical values that ground New Welfare Economics. The second argues that Alfred Marshall's forgotten economics of the family (which reflects the long-lasting influence of Hegel's Philosophy of History) provides a new perspective on his understanding of the economics-ethics relation.

Two bouts of maternity leave, a mixture of part- and full-time fractions, and flexible work patterns, allows her to aspire to a work-life balance, following the births of her two sons.

Research interests

Political Theory and Political Philosophy

- Approaches to justice in continental and analytic philosophy

- Contemporary European philosophy

- Critical theory

- Economics and ethics

- Political theory and Australian politics

Social theory

- Contemporary French social theory

- Cooperative well-being

- MAUSS – Mouvement anti-utilitariste dans les sciences sociales

- Theories of recognition

Teaching units

  • POL2/3PID - Political Ideas and Ideologies
  • POL2/3HMP - History of Modern Political Thought
  • POL2/3LAC - Justice, Freedom and Difference, co-taught with Dr Nicholas Barry
  • ECO3EAE - Economics and Ethics, co-taught with Professor John King
  • POL4PRD - Politics, Rights and Democracy
  • POL3HON - Politics in Our Time, co-taught with a team

Recent publications

Books

  • Bankovsky M. (2012), Perfecting Justice in Rawls, Habermas and Honneth: A Deconstructive Perspective. Hardback: Continuum. Paperback: Bloomsbury 2013.
  • Bankovsky, M. and Alice Le Goff, (eds) (2012 ), Recognition Theory and Contemporary French Moral and Political Philosophy: Reopening the Dialogue. Manchester UP.
  • Bankovsky, M. and Le Goff, A. (eds) (2012), Penser la reconnaissance, entre théorie critique et philosophie française contemporaine. CNRS Editions Alpha.

Refereed journal articles and refereed conference papers

  • Bankovsky, M. (forthcoming) "Alfred Marshall's Household Economics: The Role of the Family in Cultivating an Ethical Capitalism," Cambridge Journal of Economics.
  • Bankovsky, M. (forthcoming, March 2018), "Alfred Marshall on Cooperation: Restraining the Cruel Force of Competition", History of Political Economy. Accepted April 2017.
  • Bankovsky, M. and John E. King (2017), "Reviving the Living Dead: Economic Policy with Ethical Values", Journal of Australian Political Economy. Special Issue (JAPE's 80th issue): What's Wrong with Economics?
  • Bankovsky, M. (2016), "Excusing Economic Envy: On Injustice and Impotence", Journal of Applied Philosophy. (Awarded the Australasian Association of Philosophy's Annette Baier Prize 2017).
  • Bankovsky, M. (2015), "Alfred Marshall on Cooperation". Society for Heterodox Economists Conference - Refereed Proceedings, 1-18.
  • Bankovsky, M. (2015), "On the philosophy and politics of envy". Australian Political Studies Association Conference - Refereed Proceedings, 1-16.
  • Bankovsky, M. (2014), "The failure of New Welfare Economics to insulate itself from ethics: on the need for standards permitting interpersonal comparison". Society for Heterodox Economists Conference - Refereed Proceedings, 1-14.
  • Bankovsky, M. Toula Nicolacopoulos and George Vassilacopoulos (2014), “The Times of Our Lives: Contexts and Critique”. Thesis Eleven: Critical Theory and Historical Sociology, Vol. 120, 3-9.
  • Bankovsky, M. (2014), “The Future of Critical Theory: Reply to Amy Allen”. Thesis Eleven: Critical Theory and Historical Sociology, Vol. 120, 26-42.
  • Bankovsky, M. (2011), “Social Justice: Defending Rawls’ Theory of Justice against Honneth’s Objections”, Philosophy & Social Criticism 36(1): 95-118.
  • Bankovsky, M. (2009), “La Justice sociale: défendre Rawls contre les objections de Honneth”, Le Temps philosophique 13 (La reconnaissance: perspectives critiques), 275-300.
  • Bankovsky, M. (2005), “Derrida brings Levinas to Kant: The Welcome, Ethics and Cosmopolitical Law.” Philosophy Today 49(2), 156-170.
  • Bankovsky, M. (2004), “A Thread of Knots: Jacques Derrida’s Homage to Emmanuel Levinas’s Ethics.” Invisible Culture 8, 1-19.

Book chapters

  • Bankovsky, M. (2015), "Portée et pertinence morale de l’envie excusable chez Rawls : questions critiques”. In John Rawls : Le sens de la justice : une utopie réaliste? Rawls et ses critiques, Sophie Guérard de Latour, Gabrielle Radica et Céline Spector (eds). Classiques Garnier.
  • Bankovsky, M. and Alice Le Goff (2012), “Deepening critical theory: French Contributions to Theories of Recognition.” In Recognition Theory and Contemporary Moral and Political Philosophy: Reopening the Dialogue. Manchester UP, pp. 3-22.
  • Bankovsky, M. (2012), “Justice-to-come in the work of Axel Honneth and Nancy Fraser.” In Recognition Theory and Contemporary Moral and Political Philosophy: Reopening the Dialogue. Manchester UP, pp. 208-225.
  • Bankovsky, M. and Axel Honneth (2012), “The Relevance of Contemporary French philosophy for a Theory of Recognition: An Interview.” In Recognition Theory and Contemporary Moral and Political Philosophy: Reopening the Dialogue. Manchester UP, pp. 23-38.
  • Bankovsky, M. (2012), “La justice deconstructive comme reconnaissance transformatrice ou souci d’autrui: Questions à l’intention de Fraser et de Honneth”, Aude Plontz and Alice Le Goff (trans.). In Penser la reconnaissance, entre théorie critique et philosophie française contemporaine. CNRS Editions Alpha.
  • Bankovsky, M. and Alice Le Goff (2012), “Théorie de la reconnaissance, théorie sociale et philosophie françaises contemporaines”. In Penser la reconnaissance, entre théorie critique et philosophie française contemporaine. CNRS Editions Alpha.
  • Bankovsky, M. (2010), “Lyotard sur l’incommensurabilité de l’éthique lévinassienne et l’impératif catégorique kantien.” In Lyotard à Nanterre. Claire Pagès (ed.). Paris: Klincksieck, “Continents philosophiques”, pp.63-77
  • Bankovsky, M. (2006), "Judaizing Ethical Politics: Levinas, Difficult Freedom and the Messianic City." In Re-ethnicizing the Minds? Cultural Revival in Contemporary Thought, Thorsten Botz-Bornstein and Jurgen Hengelbrock (eds). Rodopi, pp. 357-378.

For further details, see Resume (below).

Resume

Download Resume

Research projects

1. Discovery Early Career Researcher Award: "Revisiting the foundations of mainstream economics: A cooperative account of well-being and moral improvement". Awarded by: The Australian Research Council (a three year grant, taken from 2013-2019 as a combination of part- and full-time fractions, which also included two bouts of maternity leave (21 months FTE)).

2. “The realisation of money: Global markets, economic citizens and democratic politics” (Lead CI: George Vassilacopoulos, Partner CI: Miriam Bankovsky, Carol D’Cruz, Toula Nicolacopoulos and Jasmine-Kim Westerndorf). Awarded by: Transforming Human Societies, La Trobe University (2015).