Staff profile

Dr Tracey Banivanua Mar

Associate Professor, Principal Research Fellow/Australian Research Council Future Fellow

College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce
Humanities and Social Sciences
Department of Archaeology and History

DMB E121, Melbourne (Bundoora)

Qualifications

BA (Hons-Melbourne), PhD (Melbourne).

Area of study

Aboriginal Studies
Australian Studies
History

Brief profile

 

Tracey is currently an Australian Research Council Future Fellow (2014-2015) whose teaching and research interests include colonial and transnational Indigenous histories with a concentration on Australia and the western Pacific. She has published widely on race relations and the dynamics of violence in Queensland’s sugar districts during the era of the Queensland-Pacific indentured labour trade, and nineteenth-century histories of Australian South Sea Islanders. Her research has been award winning, earning her the University of Melbourne’s Dennis Wettenhall prize for research in Australian History. Her book Violence and Colonial Dialogue (2007) was also shortlisted for the New South Wales Premiers Prize for Australian History in 2008. Tracey’s current research on two ARC projects is examining the myriad strategies and interconnected networks established by Indigenous peoples during the nineteenth century as they negotiated the impact of colonialism. Some of Tracey's other areas of study include Colonial and Post-Colonial Studies as well as Australian and Pacific History. She is available to supervise in the area of transnational history; race relations; indigenous studies and Australian and Pacific studies. Her current Australian Research Council funded Discovery Project, 'Land and Colonial Cultures' (DP120104928) can be followed here

Research interests

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History

- Indigenous studies

Australian History

- Australian and Pacific Colonialism

Post Colonial Studies

- Critical imperial history

Teaching units

  • HIS2HTS Slavery and Human Trafficking
  • HIS3AAH Australian Aboriginal History

 

Recent publications

Books

Journal Articles

  • Banivanua Mar, T., 'Imperial Literacy and Indigenous Rights: Tracing  transoceanic circuits of a modern discourse', Aboriginal History, 37, (2013): 1-28.
  • Banivanua Mar, 'Settler-Colonial Landscapes and Narratives of Possession', Arena Journal, 37/38 (2012): 176-98.
  • BAnivanua Mar, 'Belonging to Country: racialising space and resistance on Queensland's transnational margins, 1880-1900', Australian Historical Studies, 43 (2012): 174-90.
  • Banivanua Mar, T., ‘Cannibalism and Colonialism: charting colonies, resistance and legal frontiers in nineteenth-century Fiji’, Comparative Studies in Society and History, 52:2, (2010): 255-81.
  • Banivanua Mar, T., ‘Frontier Space and the Reification of the Rule of Law: Colonial Negotiation in the Western Pacific, 1870-74’, Australian Feminist Law Journal, 30 (2009): 23-39.
  • Banivanua Mar, T., ‘“A Thousand Miles of Cannibal Lands”: Imagining Away Genocide in the Re-Colonization of West Papua’, The Journal of Genocide Research, 10:4 (2008): 570-598.
  • Banivanua Mar, T., “Human Rights through the Lens of Critical Race Theory”, Just Policy, 43 (2007): 55-67.
  • Banivanua Mar, T., “Consolidating Violence and Colonial Rule: Discipline and Protection in Colonial Queensland”, Postcolonial Studies, 8:3, (2005): 303-320.

Book Chapters

  • Banivanua Mar, T., and Edmonds, P., 'Settler/Indigenous Relations', in Stuart Macintyre and Alison Bashford (eds), The Cambridge History of Australia, (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013): 342-66.
  • Banivanua Mar, T., ‘Sowing and Dignity: women’s work, race and the civilizing mission in Queensland, 1850-1900’, Williams, C. (ed), Indigenous Women and Work: transnational perspectives, (Illinois: University of Illinois Press, 2012).
  • Banivanua Mar, T. and Edmonds, P., ‘Introduction: Making Space in the Settler Colony’, in Banivanua Mar, T. and Edmonds P., (eds), Making Settler Colonial Space: perspectives on race, place and identity, (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010): 1-24.
  • Banivanua Mar, T., ‘Carving Wilderness: national parks and the unsettling of emptied lands’ in Banivanua Mar, T. and Edmonds P., (eds), Making Settler Colonial Space: perspectives on race, place and identity, (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010): 73-94.
  • Banivanua Mar, T., ‘Reading the Shadows of Whiteness: a case of racial clarity on Queensland’s colonial borderlands, 1880-1900’ in Boucher, L. et. al. (eds), Re-Orienting Whiteness, (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009): 149-164.
  • Banivanua Mar, T., “Cannibalism in Fiji: A Study in Colonialism’s Discursive Atavism’, Grimshaw, P. and R. McGregor, (eds.), Collisions of Cultures and Identities: Settlers and Indigenous Peoples, (Melbourne: RMIT Publishing, 2006): 155-75.

 

Research projects

  • ARC Future Fellowship, 2014-2019 (FT130100884): 'Rehearsals in Colonialism: Tracking Transpacific Expressions of Indigenous and Settler Sovereignty, 1788-1900'.
  • ARC Discovery Project, 2012-2016 (DP120104928): ‘Land and Colonial Cultures: tracing Indigenous and settler transformation in the Pacific, 1850-1900’.
  • La Trobe University Central Grant Scheme, 2008: Sailing the Winds of Change: transnational histories of decolonization in the Pacific
  • United Nations Educational Social and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), 2011. Slave Route Project: International Slave Trade and the Pacific Region.

Research Supervisions

  • Nikita Vanderbyl (PhD), Collection and Production of Indigenous Art
  • Lyndon Pratt (MA), Early colonial encounters on Australia's south coast
  • Gabrielle Haynes (PhD), Histories of Place in Mackay
  • Crystal McKinnon (PhD), Indigenous resistance narratives
  • Nadia Rhook (PhD), Race and Language in colonial Victoria

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