Staff profile

Professor Nick Bisley

Executive Director, La Trobe Asia

College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce
Humanities and Social Sciences
Department of Politics and Philosophy

SS 328, Melbourne (Bundoora)

Qualifications

BA (Hons) Melbourne, MSc Econ (London School of Economics), PhD (London School of Economics)

Area of study

Asian Studies
International Relations
Politics

Brief profile

Nick Bisley is the Executive Director of La Trobe Asia and Professor of International Relations. His research and teaching expertise is in Asia's international relations, globalisation and the diplomacy of great powers. Nick is currently the Editor-in-Chief of the Australian Journal of International Affairs, the country’s oldest scholarly journal in the field of International Relations. Nick is a director of the Australian Institute of International Affairs, a member of the Council for Security and Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific and has been a Senior Research Associate of the International Institute of Strategic Studies and a Visiting Fellow at the East West-Center in Washington DC. Nick is the author of many works on international relations, including Issues in 21st Century World Politics, 2nd Edition (Palgrave, 2013), Great Powers in the Changing International Order (Lynne Rienner, 2012), and Building Asia’s Security (IISS/Routledge, 2009, Adelphi No. 408). He regularly contributes to and is quoted in national and international media including The Guardian, The Economist, and South China Morning Post. Nick also regularly hosts Asia Rising, the podcast of La Trobe Asia which examines the news and events of Asia's states and societies.

Research interests

International Relations

- Diplomacy

- Globalization

- International relations of the Asia-Pacific

- International relations of the great powers

- Regionalism

Teaching units

During my secondment I am not teaching subjects on a regular basis.

Recent publications

Research projects

American Power and Asia's Regional Order book project under contract with Palgrave Macmillan

South China Sea Disputes and Regional Order

The Future of Asia's Regional Order

Institutionalizing Asian security multilateralism

 

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