Staff profile

Dr Dirk Tomsa - on leave in 2015 and 2016.

Senior Lecturer

College of Arts, Social Sciences and Commerce
Humanities and Social Sciences
Department of Politics and Philosophy

Melbourne (Bundoora)

Qualifications

MA (Muenster), PhD (Melbourne).

Membership of professional associations

Asian Studies Association of Australia.

Area of study

Asian Studies
Politics

Brief profile

Dirk joined La Trobe University in January 2010. His main research interests include Indonesian politics and society, democratization studies, political Islam in Asia, as well as comparative Southeast Asian politics, especially elections and party politics.

Research interests

Government and Politics of Asia and the Pacific

- Comparative democratization

- Indonesian and Southeast Asian politics

Teaching units

  • AST1IJI - Intro to Asia: Japan and Indonesia.
  • POL2DEM - Democracies and Dictatorships: Introduction to Comparative Politics.
  • POL3SEA - Southeast Asian Politics: Conflict and Change.
  • POL3IPS - Indonesian Politics and Society.

Recent publications

  • Tomsa, D 2014, 'Party System Fragmentation in Indonesia: The Sub-national Dimension', Journal of East Asian Studies, 14 (2): 249-278.
  • Tomsa, D and Ufen, A (eds) 2013, Party Politics in Southeast Asia: Clientelism and Electoral Competition in Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines, London and New York, Routledge.
  • Tomsa, D and Ufen, A 2013, 'Introduction: Party Politics and Clientelism in Southeast Asia', Dirk Tomsa and Andreas Ufen (eds) Party Politics in Southeast Asia: Clientelism and Electoral Competition in Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines, London and New York, Routledge, pp. 1-19.
  • Tomsa, D 2013, 'What Type of Party? Southeast Asian Parties between Clientelism and Electoralism', Dirk Tomsa and Andreas Ufen (eds) Party Politics in Southeast Asia: Clientelism and Electoral Competition in Indonesia, Thailand and the Philippines, London and New York, Routledge, pp. 20-39.
  • Tomsa, D 2012, 'Still the Natural Government Party? Challenges and Opportunities for Golkar ahead of the 2014 Election', South East Asia Research, 20 (4): 491-509.
  • Tomsa, D 2012, 'Moderating Islamism in Indonesia: Tracing Patterns of Party Change in the Prosperous Justice Party', Political Research Quarterly, 65 (3): 486-498.
  • Tomsa, D 2010, ‘Indonesian Politics in 2010: The Perils of Stagnation’, Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Vol. 46, No. 3, pp. 309-328.
  • Tomsa, D 2010, ‘The Indonesian Party System after the 2009 Elections: Towards Stability?’, Edward Aspinall and Marcus Mietzner (eds), Problems of Democratisation in Indonesia: Elections, Institutions and Society, Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, pp 141-159.
  • Tomsa, D 2010, ‘Disdained but Indispensable: Political Parties in Post-Suharto Indonesia’, Thomas Reuter (ed.), The Return to Constitutional Democracy in Indonesia, Monash University Press, Caulfield, pp 89-104.
  • Tomsa, D 2009, ‘Electoral Democracy in a Divided Society: The 2008 Gubernatorial Election in Maluku, Indonesia’, Southeast Asia Research, 17(2): 229-259.
  • Tomsa, D 2009, ‘Uneven Party Institutionalization, Protracted Transition and the Remarkable Resilience of Golkar’, in Marco Buente and Andreas Ufen (eds), Democratization in Post-Suharto Indonesia, Routledge, London and New York, pp 176-198.
  • Tomsa, D 2008, Party Politics and Democratization in Indonesia: Golkar in the Post-Suharto Era, Routledge, London and New York.
  • Tomsa, D 2007, ‘Party Politics and the Media: Creating a New Dual Identity for Golkar’, Contemporary Southeast Asia, 29(1): 77-96.
  • Tomsa, D 2006, ‘The Defeat of Centralized Paternalism: Factionalism, Assertive Regional Cadres, and the Long Fall of Golkar Chairman Akbar Tandjung’, Indonesia, 81 (April), pp 1-22.