Members

Researchers

If you are interested in Honours or postgraduate research, contact a member of the research group:

Postgraduate students

Mr Clarence Leon Goh

clarence2008

Email: c.goh@latrobe.edu.au

Tell us a little about your role with the TIGER radar

TIGER is 1 of 30 SuperDARN radars that detects irregularities in the ionosphere by a transmitting a series of pulses that are slightly out of phase. Prior to each beam transmission, a 2-stage clear frequency sweep is sampled at the receiver. At the lowest frequency computed by these 2 stages, SuperDARN determines the transmit frequency.

The I and the Q values, which were originally sent at this computed frequency, reflect and refract off the ionosphere and are scattered, demonstrating a PDF reflective of clutter, atmospheric noise, man-made noise, galactic noise and variations in electron density in the F region of the ionosphere. This causes bad lags that give an incorrect ACF fit and consequently an incorrect backscatter, velocity and spectral width.

Based on the PDF distribution of noise, a modified median filtering technique is designed and used in the fine clear frequency scan routine and in the received IQDAT. This will identify a new frequency for transmission and reduce bad lags. The final goal of this research will be a better performing ACF with less bad lags by the removal of noise clutter, which results in improved parameter computation.

Please provide a highlight of working with the TIGER radar team

I particularly enjoyed meeting with the father of modern radars at a conference. There are many things that I have learnt from him and from other members of the TIGER team, especially in programming and how it relates to the physical workings of the radar.

What advice do you have for future students interested in Space Physics, Radar and Engineering?

Always ask when in doubt. Research is a satisfying process but requires commitment, dedication and persistence. The ability to seek knowledge is very much like finding pieces in a jigsaw puzzle and putting them together in a meaningful way.

Ms Emma Bland

Emma-Bland-8

Email: e.bland@latrobe.edu.au

Tell us a little about your role with the TIGER radar

I'm using the TIGER radars to monitor the conditions of the ionosphere in real-time. In particular, to determine two key parameters in long-distance radio wave communications - the maximum usable frequency (MUF) and the F-region ionospheric critical frequency (foF2) over the field of view of the radar. These parameters are important for users of HF radio communications including commercial airlines, the State Emergency Service (SES), the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA), and defence and maritime operations.

Please provide a highlight of working with the TIGER radar team

Travelling to Adelaide to help build the Buckland Park Radar has been a great highlight of my time at La Trobe. It's very exciting to be involved with a project like this; I am part of a fabulous team and I will be one of the first people to work with the new data.

What advice do you have for future students interested in Space Physics, Radar and Engineering?

The sky is the limit in space science! Keep up your maths, and it's well worth taking the time to pick up some computer programming skills too.

Mr Tom Kane

Kane_web

Email: t.kane@latrobe.edu.au

Tell us a little about your role with the TIGER radar

I'm researching electric fields in the ionosphere during space weather events known as geomagnetic storms. During these storms, large electric fields can be generated within the ionosphere, which can induce currents in pipelines and overhead powerlines. Currents in pipelines can cause corrosion, while spikes in currents in electric wires can cause damage to electrical systems, potentially leading to wide-spread blackouts and costly damage.

Please provide a highlight of working with the TIGER radar team

Probably the most memorable part of my work with TIGER was attending the SuperDARN conference in South Africa in 2010. Not only was the conference a fantastic way to share my own work with others, but it provided an opportunity to converse with seasoned veterans in the field and learn more about their research, too.

What advice do you have for future students interested in Space Physics, Radar and Engineering?

Get involved! There are still many interesting, unanswered questions out there waiting to be solved.

Mr Thanh Nguyen

Email: tt72nguyen@students.latrobe.edu.au

Tell us a little about your role with the TIGER radar:

The Auto Correlation Function (ACF) technique has been consistently applied in the Super DARN to measure velocity, spectral width and signal power. As part of the development of the new TIGER radar at Buckland Park, my role is to propose a new technique of measuring velocity. The new technique should provide higher accuracy than the existing ACF technique and will be used as a means for cross-checking results.

In the proposed technique, the transmitted signal spectrum is considered as reference for direct comparison with received signal spectrum, from which the Spectrum Difference Function (SDF) is determined. Mathematical proof shows that the gradient of the SDF in the vicinity of carrier frequency is directly proportional to the target Doppler frequency and therefore, target velocity. Results have been optimistic so far and I hope the technique will be implemented in the next generation of TIGER.

Please provide a highlight of working with the TIGER radar team

The helpfulness of the staff impresses me the most. Whether you need computer software, a book or academic advice, there is always someone in the TIGER team or in the Department of Electronic Engineering willing to help you.

What advice do you have for future students interested in Space Physics, Radar and Engineering?

Be very well prepared before starting your PhD research. Talk with your supervisors about which skills are necessary for your research and do a literature review in the research area you are going to get involved. By doing so, you will save a lot of time at the beginning, gain confidence and make the most of your research time.

Undergraduate students