Mimosaceae

Acacia acinaceaAcacia acinacea

Acacia acinacea is commonly known as Gold Dust Wattle. The delicate bright yellow balls of this wattle are made up from relatively few individual flowers (sometimes less than 10).

Like most local wattles, pollen is dispersed in units of 16 individual grains. Honey bees are one of the major pollinators.

Pollen images

Electron microscopy

Acacia aspera

Acacia aspera is commonly known as Rough Wattle. It grows as a small shrub upto 1.2 m in height. As its common name suggests, its branches and leaves are rough.

It flowers from July to November. 30-50 bright yellow flowers make up a ball which appears fluffy due to the numerous stamens. Pollen is thus carried on the outside of the ball and is easily accessible by pollinating agents. Honey bees are commonly seen on wattles, even though the amount of nectar in such tiny individual flowers must be miniscule. As with most wattles, the pollen unit is complex, being made up of many (here sixteen) individual grains.

Pollen images

Light microscopy
Electron microscopy

 Acacia genistifoliaAcacia genistifolia

Acacia genistifolia is commonly known as Spreading Wattle. One of the few winter-flowering wattles in Victoria, this species may constitute quite an important food source for insects. Honey bees are often seen around blooming shrubs, probably collecting pollen. It may also be possible that birds are involved in pollination.

The cream-coloured balls of wattle are made up of about ten individual flowers and the pollen is similar to other local wattles, consisting of 16 individual grains.

Pollen images

Electron microscopy

Acacia paradoxaAcacia paradoxa

Acacia paradoxa is commonly known as Hedge Wattle.

It flowers from August to November. 30-40 bright yellow flowers make up a ball, 8-9 mm in diameter. Pollen is located at the tips of the numerous anthers and easily transferred to visiting insects. The species name paradoxa refers to this plant being unusual or strange, perhaps because of its numerous spines, but the pollen is unusual too. Instead of sixteen individual grains commonly found in local wattles, ten or less make up the dispersal unit.

Pollen images

Light microscopy
Electron microscopy

Acacia pycnantha

Acacia pycnantha

Acacia pycnanthais commonly known as Golden Wattle.

It flowers from August to October. 50-80 bright yellow flowers make up a ball, 8-10mm in diameter. In many wattles the female organ, the style, emerges first. On that day, the flowers are female and receptive to pollen from another flower. The next day the pollen bearing organs, the stamens emerge and the balls gain their usual fluffy appearance. Honeybees are commonly seen on Golden Wattle blossoms or, as the photo shows, hoverflies, but birds may actually also be involved in the pollination of this species. Sixteen united pollen grains make up the dispersal unit.

Pollen images

Light microscopy
Electron microscopy