Delivering chemotherapy drugs using nanoparticles

Immobilised metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) is a biochemical based separation technique commonly employed in protein separation. Translation of IMAC into microarray and microfluidic technology would see significant improvements in processing times, reagent volumes and overall efficiency. CSIRO researchers have previously shown that plasma polymers can be used to bind metal ions and subsequently bind functional biological proteins selectively.

We are investigating the fundamental mechanisms of metal and protein binding to the plasma polymer surfaces and optimising the surface, metal, metal-ligand and protein chemistries to achieve optimal performance of the surface bound proteins in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening and protein ligand-cell based screening assays.

It is known that plasma polymers can be used to bind metals that can then subsequently bind biological proteins of interest in a functional manner. To date, only a small amount of work in this field has been conducted, primarily by CSIRO researchers. The benefits of this approach are that the plasma polymer deposition technique allows the surface functionalisation on numerous materials including both organic, inorganic and metal substrates. This research, based on the principles of IMAC, Immobilised metal affinity chromatography, is investigating the fundamental mechanisms of metal and protein binding (via XPS, ToF-SIMS and the use of recombinant proteins, supported by extensive multivariate analysis including PCA, HCA and self organised mapping) to the plasma polymer surfaces and optimise the surface, metal, metal-ligand and protein chemistries to achieve optimal performance of the surface bound proteins in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) screening.

This is a CSIRO – LIMS joint project.