Out-of-home care | Assessing descriptors of academic program inherent requirements" /> National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE), Centre for Higher Education Equity and Diversity Research, La Trobe University

National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE)

Out-of-home care

The Centre for Higher Education Equity and Diversity Research (CHEEDR; formerly known as The Access and Achievement Research Unit) mapped the higher education sector in relation to people from out-of-home care backgrounds, including kinship care and foster care. The $64,000 project was selected for funding by the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE) to increase the visibility of the out-of-home care cohort and to provide a strong information base for future policy and research work.

Read the final report

The report is also available through the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education.

Media coverage of the report:

Australian Broadcasting Corporation (2015). Out-of-home care: Interview with Chief Investigator, Dr Andrew Harvey, ABC PM, 11 March.

Cervini, E. (2015). University could transform those leaving care - but no welcome mat laid out, The Age, 23 March

Hare, J. (2015). $724K grant to boost tertiary study for abused youth, The Australian, 6 August.

Harvey, A. & McNamara, P. (2015). Out of care and into university, Australian Policy Online, 8 June.

La Trobe University (2015). Out of care and out of uni options, UniNews, 12 March.

Loussikian, K. (2015). Foster care leavers need extra support in higher education, The Australian, 11 March.

McCallum, A. (2015), Young people leaving foster homes at 18 still need care, The Age, 20 April.

Mendes, P. (2015). Young people not supported after they leave care, Eureka Street, 16 March.

Passmore, D. (2015). Queensland ejects hundreds of youngsters a year from state care as they turn 18, The Courier Mail, 14 March.

Assessing descriptors of academic program inherent requirements

This $20,553 project assessed descriptors of academic program inherent requirements across the Australian higher education sector. There has been long-standing advocacy amongst Australian university disability practitioners for the introduction of statements that describe academic program inherent requirements. These statements are perceived to be useful in facilitating the provision of reasonable adjustments that enable the participation of students with disability. There has, however, been little research undertaken on the prevalence or characteristics of these statements. The study will further knowledge on the usage of inherent requirement statements and will inform policy and practice to support the participation of students with disability.

Read the final report

The report is also available through the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education.