International collaborators

Professor Jane Long (SDVC, La Trobe), Dr Stella Flores and Dr Andrew Harvey (Director of CHEEDR)Left to right: Professor Jane Long (SDVC, La Trobe), Dr Stella Flores (New York University) and Dr Andrew Harvey (Director of CHEEDR, La Trobe)

Associate Professor Stella Flores (New York University, United States)

Associate Professor of Higher Education at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

New York University, United States of America

The Centre hosted a visiting fellowship of Associate Professor Stella Flores from New York University, who is conducting ongoing research with us on comparative international student equity frameworks, particularly around admissions and affirmative action. The fellowship was funded through La Trobe’s Research Focus Area: Transforming Human Societies in 2016, and will support us to develop the initial Salzburg Foundation Grant supporting the research.

Biography

Dr. Stella M. Flores is an Associate Professor of Higher Education at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. She is also Director of Access and Equity at the Steinhardt Institute for Higher Education Policy at NYU.  Dr. Flores holds an EdD and EdM from Harvard University, an MPAff from The University of Texas at Austin, and a BA from Rice University. In her research she employs large-scale databases and quantitative methods to investigate the effects of state and federal policies on college access and completion rates for low-income and underrepresented populations. Professor Flores serves on the editorial board of Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, The Review of Higher Education, and Sociology of Education. She has also been recognized as one of the top 200 scholars in Education Week’s RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings. Her research has been funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the National Academy of Education, the Spencer Foundation, and the Educational Testing Service.

Professor Claire Cameron (University of London, United Kingdom)

Professor of Social Pedagogy

University College London Institute of Education

University of London, United Kingdom

Professor Claire Cameron was on our Project Reference Group for the NCSEHE care leaver project: Out of care, into university: raising higher education access and achievement of care leavers.

Biography

Professor Claire Cameron is co-Deputy Director, Thomas Coram Research Unit (TCRU) and founding member of the Centre for Understanding of Social Pedagogy (CUSP) at University College London Institute of Education. She is a sociologist interested in research studies about, with and for looked after children, early childhood education and care, European comparative research, and cross-national methods.

Kimberly Reyes (University of Michigan, United States)

PhD Candidate

University of Michigan, United States of America

Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education (CSHPE)

Kimberly Reyes was a partner on our NPP research project Student equity and employability in higher education.

Biography

Kimberly A. Reyes is a PhD candidate in Higher Education at the University of Michigan, where her dissertation research draws on social movement theory to understand how scholars in the field of Ethnic Studies mobilize for equity-oriented change in the academy. In addition, her faculty-led projects have examined the culture of STEM departments that are deeply engaged in diversity efforts, as well as the creation of institutional policies that affect educational access for undocumented immigrant students.  Most recently, Kim served as the Gerardo Marín Diversity Dissertation Fellow at the University of San Francisco, where she taught in the Higher Education & Student Affairs (HESA) master’s program.

Dr Carme Montserrat (University of Girona, Spain)

Deputy Dean in the Faculty of Education and Psychology

University of Girona, Spain

Dr Carme Montserrat was on our Project Reference Group for the NCSEHE care leaver project: Out of care, into university: raising higher education access and achievement of care leavers.

Biography

Dr Carme Montserrat is deputy dean in the Faculty of Education and Psychology at the University of Girona (Spain). She is tenured professor at this Faculty, teaching at the degrees of Psychology and Social Education, and also at different master’s, degrees and doctoral programs. She is also a researcher in the Research Team on Childhood, Adolescence, Children’s rights and their Quality of Life within the Research Institute on Quality of Life (IRQV). She had previously worked in the welfare system in the city of Barcelona as well as being consultant with the Council of Europe. Her main areas of research are related to children and young people in social services and public care. She is a member of the International Association of Outcome-Based Evaluation and Research on Family and Children’s Services (iaOBER).

Dr Sam Sellar (Manchester Metropolitan University, United Kingdom)

Reader in Education Studies

Manchester Metropolitan University, United Kingdom

Dr Sam Sellar was a partner on our NPP research project Globalization opportunities for low socio-economic status and regional students.

Biography

Sam Sellar is Reader in Education Studies at Manchester Metropolitan University and a member of the Board of Directors for the Laboratory of International Assessment Studies. He was previously Postdoctoral Senior Research Fellow in the School of Education at The University of Queensland. Sam’s research on higher education has focused on (a) student aspirations as a target of equity policy and (b) mobility as a factor that affects higher education access and outcomes. He has also studied school systems in Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom to explore how large-scale assessments and associated data infrastructures shape policy and practice in schools. He has published widely on the growing influence of data in education globally, including the education work of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and its Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). Sam is currently an associate editor of Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education.

Professor Julia Clarke (Manchester Metropolitan University, United Kingdom)

Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Faculty of Business and Law

Manchester Metropolitan University, United Kingdom

Professor Julia Clarke was a partner on our NPP research project Student equity and employability in higher education.

Biography

Prior to moving into higher education Julia worked for one of the big four accountancy firms in Manchester where she specialised in corporate taxation. She moved across to the HE sector to take up a post as a research assistant at the University of Central Lancashire, working on a project on monitoring and evaluation by charitable trusts.

Julia's first lecturing post was at Manchester Metropolitan University and she moved from here to the University of Leeds in 1997. At Leeds, Julia led on a range of undergraduate, Masters, MBA and corporate programmes on Business Ethics, Corporate Governance, Financial Analysis, Financial Accounting, Taxation and Auditing. She was previously Undergraduate Tutor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Business School. In 2011 she became Pro-Dean for Student Education for the Faculty of Business.

Julia is a founding member of the Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning in Inter-Disciplinary Ethics Applied and was the first Director of the Q-Step Centre at the University of Leeds. Julia is an active participant in the business education community, through her work with the Chartered Association of Business Schools and with the international accrediting bodies. She has been a reviewer for the Quality Assurance Agency since 2008.

Julia has published on corporate social reporting, business ethics and business education. Her current research is on equity and graduate employability with a particular focus on mentoring and social capital. This research provided the model for the Nurturing Talent Mentoring Scheme, a programme which now matches upwards of 150 students with mentors from the world of work each year.

In June 2015 Julia returned to Manchester Metropolitan University to take up the post of Pro-Vice-Chancellor, Faculty of Business and Law at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Dr Carla Houkamau (The University of Auckland, New Zealand)

Academic Director of the Tuākana programme (Business School)

Senior Lecturer in the Department of Management and International Business

The University of Auckland, New Zealand

The Centre hosted a visiting fellowship of Dr Carla Houkamau in June 2017.

Biography

Carla Houkamau (PhD) is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Management and International Business at the University of Auckland. Her current research programme is concerned with the business case for diversity management: in particular, how diversity management can foster a positive work environment for individuals from diverse backgrounds while promoting employee engagement and productivity.

Carla has written and presented on implicit bias in education and is the Director for the Maori and Pacific Tuakana programme for the University of Auckland. This programme leads the Business School’s commitment to support Māori and Pacific students at Stage 1 and 2. He Tuākana mentoring employs 15 tutors spread across nine stage one and two papers and provides supplementary academic support for first and second year Māori and Pacific students. Tuakana also connects first year students (tēina-mentees) with senior students (tuākana-mentors) to help tēina-mentees transition successfully into university life. Carla’s research is recognised nationally and internationally for her contributions to understandings of the relationship between Māori culture, identity and wellbeing. Carla co-developed the Multi-dimensional Model of Māori identity and Cultural Engagement (MMM-ICE) in 2010, which is a novel and culturally-sensitive measures of Māori identity which provides critical information about the diversity of Māori identities, while also demonstrating the remarkable resilience of Māori culture and communities.  Her research using the MMM-ICE has shown that Māori cultural efficacy—one’s ability to engage with Māori culture—provides a critical buffer against psychological stressors. Her work has also helped identify risk factors against discrimination, and identified previously unknown factor contributing to the low rates of home ownership amongst Māori and identify hidden discriminatory practices in New Zealand’s housing industry. In 2015 Carla's leadership in this area of research was recognised when she was awarded a Marsden grant for her project titled 'How great can we be? Identity leaders of the Māori economic renaissance'.

Full details on her MMM-ICE measure and the online survey can be found here http://www.Māori-identity.ac.nz/ and as her CV shows, she is frequently featured in Māori and mainstream New Zealand media commenting on the centrality of Māori identity and identity diversity Māori society. Information about her, including selected publications can be found at http://www.business.auckland.ac.nz/people/chou001