Members

Penelope Allison

Penelope Allison is a Professor of Archaeology in the School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester. She is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries London and an Honorary Fellow of the Australian Academy of Humanties.  She has held research appointments at the University of Sydney and the Australian National University, and also visiting research fellowships in the Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge and at St John's College, University of Durham, as well as a Harold White Fellowship at the National Library of Australia.

Professor Allison's research in Roman urban and military contexts and in Australian historical archaeology focuses on household archaeology, gender and space and, more recently on foodways material culture. Her major publications include: The archaeology of household activities (Routledge 1999), Casa della Caccia Antica, Häuser in Pompeji vol 11 (co-authored with Frank Sear - Hirmer, Munich 2002), Pompeian Households: An Analysis of the Material Culture (The Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA, 2004, reprinted 2005); The Insula of the Menander in Pompeii III: The Finds, a Contextual Study (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 2006); People and Spaces in Roman Military Bases (Cambridge University Press, 2013).

She also has a keen research interest in digital applications in archaeology and archaeological publication. The three most recent monographs each have a companion open-access research resource. Her current research network 'Big Data on the Roman Tableware', involves digital approaches to the collation, analyses and presentation of  Roman foodways material culture.

Her research-led teaching focuses on Roman and historical archaeology, and also includes courses on Classical art, and on household archaeology and archaeological methods across the discipline. She teaches both undergraduate and postgraduate courses, campus based and distance learning. She is the programme director for the distance-learning MA in the Classical Mediterranean. She has previously taught courses in ancient history and archaeology at the University of Sydney, the Australian National University and the University of Sheffield.

www2.le.ac.uk/departments/archaeology/people/Allison

Email: Penelope Allison

Mary C Beaudry

Mary C Beaudry is Professor of Archaeology, Anthropology, and Gastronomy at Boston University, where she has taught historical and industrial archaeology and archaeological theory and directed graduate study in historical archaeology since 1980, and taught and advised in the Masters of Liberal Arts in Gastronomy at BU's Metropolitan College since 1992.

At Boston University, she has served as first reader on 25 PhD dissertations focusing on historical archaeology and for 27 Master's theses in historical archaeology and gastronomy; she has also served as external examiner on dissertations from the University of Toronto, University of Montreal, La Trobe University, Sydney University, University of Western Australia, Leicester University, University of Cape Town, Stony Brook University, and University of New York at Albany.

She has conducted fieldwork in Massachusetts, Maine, Virginia, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, the Western Isles of Scotland, and most recently on Montserrat in the Caribbean. Her research interests include archaeology of colonialisms, 19th- and early 20th-century urban lives, archaeology of households and domestic life, contemporary material culture studies, microhistorical approaches to interpreting archaeology of gender and gender relations, personal identity and self-fashioning, and cookery and dining.

Her recent books include Archaeology of Food: An Encyclopedia (co-edited with Karen Bescherer Metheny; Rowman & Littlefield, 2015); Beyond the Walls: New Perspectives on the Archaeology of Historical Households (co-edited with Kevin Fogel and James Nyman; U Press of Florida, 2015); Archaeologies of Mobility and Movement (co-edited with Travis Parno; Springer, 2013), Interpreting the Early Modern World:  Transatlantic Perspectives (co-edited with James Symonds; Springer, 2011), The Oxford Handbook of Material Culture Studies (co-edited with Dan Hicks; Oxford University Press, 2010), Findings: The Material Culture of Needlework and Sewing (Yale, 2006) and The Cambridge Companion to Historical Archaeology (co-edited with Dan Hicks; Cambridge University Press, 2006).

Email: Mary C Beaudry

Dr Alasdair Brooks

Dr. Alasdair Brooks is the editor of the journal Post-Medieval Archaeology and the Society for Historical Archaeology Newsletter, and works as a heritage consultant in the United Kingdom. He is a specialist in the international comparative analysis of 19th-century British material culture, with a particular focus on British ceramics, and has worked professionally in his native United Kingdom, Australia, the United States, Jamaica, Venezuela, and the Persian Gulf.

He is the author of An Archaeological Guide to British Ceramics in Australia, 1788-1901 and the editor of the volume The Importance of British Material Culture to Historical Archaeologies of the Nineteenth Century.

http://www2.le.ac.uk/departments/archaeology/people/brooks

Email: Alasdair Brooks

Heather Burke

Heather Burke is an historical archaeologist who has worked across New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania and the Northern Territory. She has taught historical archaeology at Flinders University since 2002, including various field schools, and supervised numerous student projects at Honours, Masters and PhD levels.

A central and ongoing element of her research includes an abiding interest in the development of capitalism across the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and how it changed several fundamental aspects of daily life through various structuring principles of time, labour, productivity, leisure, power, class and gender. While earlier projects examined these issues through architectural style and the relationship between expressions of group social identity through stylistic elements, later projects are investigating capitalism in relation to Indigenous people and the missionisation process.

A more recent strand involves the complexities of interactions between Europeans and Aboriginal people in various parts of Australia in the second half of the nineteenth century. A major project on the historical archaeology of the Native Mounted Police (NMOP) in Queensland is investigating the experiences of NMP troopers, including the hierarchical relationships between troopers and European offices, the domestic arrangements in camps, and the effects of the NMP on local Aboriginal people in various parts of the colony. This research is also exploring the connections between European settlers and the NMP and oral histories of the frontier. Other projects include relationships between Aboriginal people and Europeans on the central Murray River and the Eyre Peninsula in South Australia.

A third strand involves understanding the construction of social identity through material culture in a variety of contexts, including the nature of 'Irishness' in South Australia, the experiences of Chinese sojourners in far north Queensland and the archaeology of Australia's longest, continuously-used mental hospital - Willow Court in New Norfolk, Tasmania, which operated for over 170 years from 1827 until 2000.

Craig Cessford

Craig Cessford is a senior project officer, working for the developer-funded Cambridge Archaeological Unit in England. His research focuses upon medieval and later urban archaeology, with a particular
emphasis upon the 18th to 20th centuries.

He has published a number of articles on the period in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology, the Archaeological Journal and elsewhere and is a council member of the Society for Post Medieval Archaeology.

Penny Crook

Penny Crook is an early-career researcher and historical archaeologist who specialises in urban assemblage analysis and material-culture studies. She has pioneered new methods in historical-archaeological assemblage analysis and price analysis of 19th century store catalogues.

In 2014 she was awarded an ARC Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (DECRA) to extend the quality research framework and re-examine the role of consumption in colonial Sydney. Her recent publications include An Archaeology of Institutional Confinement. The Hyde Park Barracks, 1848-1886 (co-authored with Peter Davies and Tim Murray, Sydney University Press, 2013) and Creating eResearch Tools for Archaeologists: The FAIMS Project (co-authored with Shawn Ross, Adela Sobotková & Brian Ballsun-Stanton, Australian Archaeology, 2013.

http://www.latrobe.edu.au/humanities/about/staff/profile?uname=PCrook

https://latrobe.academia.edu/PennyCrook.

Peter Davies

Peter Davies is a researcher in the Department of Archaeology and History at La Trobe University.

His research interests focus on the social, industrial and environmental archaeology of colonial Australia. From 2016 he will be engaged with the ARC-funded project 'Rivers of Gold: The Legacy of Historical Gold Mining for Victoria's Rivers', which builds on previous ARC research on water management on the goldfields.

Since completing his PhD in 2001 he has published three monographs, several dozen articles and book chapters and has held an ARC Linkage Post-Doctoral fellowship investigating the archaeology of the Hyde Park Barracks in Sydney. He has extensive experience of fieldwork in Cyprus, Turkey, Syria and around Australia. He also co-edits Australasian Historical Archaeology and is past editor of Studies in Australasian Historical Archaeology.

http://www.latrobe.edu.au/archaeology-and-history/staff-students/archaeology/profile?uname=PW2Davies

Dr James Dixon

James Dixon is a Built Heritage Consultant and Research Coordinator at MOLA and Research Associate in the University of Bristol Department of Archaeology and Anthropology. He has a background in post-medieval, historical and modern world urban archaeology.

James’ main area of research is in developing archaeological histories of post-war public art and investigating the potential for artists and archaeologists to work together in the understanding of urban space. He completed a PhD thesis on the subject at the University of the West of England in 2011 and has current research interests in the UK, Denmark, China and Japan.

He is Assistant Editor of Post-Medieval Archaeology and a core member of the Architecture, Archaeology and Contemporary City Planning (AACCP) research group.

Selected recent publications: https://mola.academia.edu/JamesDixon

Email: jdixon@mola.org.uk

Shannon Dawdy

Shannon Lee Dawdy received her PhD in Anthropology and History from the University of Michigan (2003). She is currently Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago. Her work is broadly interdisciplinary and humanistic, combining archaeological, archival, and ethnographic methods with a regional focus on the U.S. South and Circum-Caribbean. Her primary field site is the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. Her archaeological work has focused on colonialism, informal economies, urbanism, and processes of creolization. She has special interests in taphonomy, temporality, and the work of Walter Benjamin. Most recently she has been working on bridging ethnographic and archaeological methods within the emerging field of the archaeology of the contemporary.

Her first book, Building the Devil's Empire (2008, University of Chicago Press), offers 'rogue colonialism' to explain how French Louisiana, and many colonies like it, functioned outside state controls, developing a political economy loosely moored to metropolitan interests. Her forthcoming book, Patina: A Profane Archaeology (2016, University of Chicago Press), uses archaeology and ethnographic interviews with survivors of Hurricane Katrina to investigate nostalgic practices surrounding antiques, heirlooms, historic houses, and ruins. She is also a co-editor of Dialogues in Cuban Archaeology (2005, Co-eds. L. Antonio Curet & Gabino La Rosa Corzo, University of Alabama Press).

Her current research focuses on rapidly changing death practices in the U.S., particularly around disposition and transformation of the body. Collaborating with a filmmaker, the work explores what happens when we turn an archaeological lens on contemporary life, and the possibilities of an artistic approach to anthropological questions.

For more details on Dr. Dawdy's excavation projects, go to: http://home.uchicago.edu/~sdawdy/home.html

Highlighted Publications

2016 Patina: A Profane Archaeology. University of Chicago Press.

2016 Profane Archaeology and the Existential Dialectics of the City. Journal of Social Archaeology.

2013 Modern American Death: Grave Goods and Blithe Mementos. In Paul Graves-Brown, Rodney Harrison and Angela Piccini (eds.). Handbook of the Archaeology of the Contemporary World. Oxford University Press.

2013 The Archaeology of Illegal and Illicit Economies (with Alexandra Hartnett) Annual Review of Anthropology, Vol. 42: 37-51.

2011 Sexualizing Space: The Colonial Leer and the Genealogy of Storyville. In B. Voss and E. Casella, eds., The Archaeology of Colonialism: Intimate Encounters and Sexual Effects. Cambridge University Press: 271-289.

2010 Clockpunk Anthropology and the Ruins of Modernity. Current Anthropology 51(6):761-793.

2008 Building the Devil's Empire: French Colonial New Orleans. University of Chicago Press.

2008 Beneath the Rising Sun: 'Frenchness' and the Archaeology of Desire. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 11(3):370-387 (with Richard Weyhing).

2006 The Taphonomy of Disaster and the (Re)formation of New Orleans. American Anthropologist. 108(4): 719-730.

2005 (Co-ed. w/ A. Curet & G. La Rosa) Dialogues in Cuban Archaeology. University of Alabama Press.

2000 Understanding Cultural Change through the Vernacular: Creolization in Louisiana. Historical Archaeology 34(3): 107-123.

James L. Flexner

James L. Flexner is a lecturer in historical archaeology and heritage at the University of Sydney. His main research interests are in landscape archaeology and historical archaeology, with a geographic focus on Oceania. Recently, he is also exploring the use of early ethnographic collections in archaeological analysis. A significant component of his research is close collaboration with local communities, as well as broader public outreach efforts to make archaeology accessible to many audiences.

His doctoral research at UC Berkeley was a study of the landscapes of the 19th century leprosarium at Kalawao, Moloka'i in the Hawaiian Islands. Since then, he has focused his research efforts on fieldwork projects in Vanuatu. His major research project from 2011-2015 was an analysis of mission sites and surrounding Melanesian landscapes during the era of early Christian contacts on the islands of Erromango and Tanna.

James received an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellowship (DE130101703) to support research in Vanuatu. Beginning in 2016 will be leading an ARC Discovery Project (DP160103578) to study 3000 years of settlement patterns and cross-cultural interactions in southern Vanuatu.

His publications in historical archaeology can be found in International Journal of Historical Archaeology, Journal of Archaeological Research, Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology, Asian Perspectives, and Journal of Pacific Archaeology, among other places. He is also author of a forthcoming book on the archaeology of missionary and Melanesian interactions on Tanna and Erromango, to be published with ANU Press.

https://sydney.academia.edu/JamesFlexner

Email: james.flexner@sydney.edu.au

Antony Francis

Antony has 30 years' of archaeological experience and is a Project Officer at MOLA, responsible for fieldwork projects. Antony has supervised deeply-stratified Roman and medieval excavations and directed large, complex, multi-period sites in London and beyond. He directed the year-long excavation at Deptford Royal Naval Dockyard and is currently writing a monograph for the site.

As well as numerous articles, Antony wrote the Archaeological Research Framework for Chichester Harbour, West Sussex, the Conservation Management Plan for Queenborough Lines in Kent (subsequently scheduled) and Stepney Gasworks: the archaeology and history of the Commercial Gas Light and Coke Company’s works at Harford Street, London E1, 1837–1946.

His main area of interest is dockyards archaeology for which there is lots of potential in Sydney whose growth was dependent on commercial ship-repairing facilities; Sydney Opera House is built on top of the former Admiralty naval office and stores. The first overseas dry dock to be constructed with Admiralty funds (1845) was located on Cockatoo Island in the harbour, now a World Heritage Site. The Royal Navy’s main operation base was established on Garden Island, where a dockyard is still in use and which is home to the Royal Australian Navy Heritage Centre.

Email: afrancis@mola.org.uk

Dr Anne Gerritsen

Academic Profile

Completed Research Projects

Selected Publications

'Ceramics in the Ximenez-Da Vega Inventory', contribution to the project entitled 'Reading the Inventory: The Possessions of the Portuguese Merchant-Banker Emmanuel Ximenez (1564-1632) in Antwerp'.

'Material Culture', in Oxford Bibliographies in Chinese Studies. Ed. Tim Wright. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014.

(eds.) Writing Material Culture History (London: Bloomsbury, 2014), 300pp., 65 B&W illustrations (with Giorgio Riello). For a review, see here: <http://hsozkult.geschichte.hu-berlin.de/media/beitraege/rezbuecher/toc_22340.pdf>

'Not "Them," but "Us"', Response to the AHA Roundtable, entitled 'It's a Small World After All', online edition of Perspectives on History, Summer 2013.

Bookreview: Dennis Flynn and Arturo Giráldez, China and the Birth of Globalization in the 16th Century (PDF Document) (Farnham: Ashgate Variorum, 2010), for The English Historical Review 128 (2013): 1220-2.

Bookreview: Michael North, Artistic and Cultural Exchanges between Europe and Asia, 1400-1900, for The English Historical Review 127 (2012): 1232-4.

'Scales of a Local: The Place of Locality in a Globalizing World.' In Douglas Northrop, ed., A Companion to World History (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012).

'Porcelain and the Material Culture of the Yuan Court (1279-1368).' Journal of Early Modern History 16 (2012): 241-273.

'Introduction to Global China: Material Culture and Connections in World History' and 'Material Culture and the Other: European Encounters with Chinese Porcelain, ca. 1650-1800', with Stephen McDowall, eds., Journal of World History 23.1 (2012).

'Ceramics for Local and Global Markets: Jingdezhen's Agora of Technologies' in Dagmar Schafer and Francesca Bray, eds., Cultures of Knowledge: Technology in Chinese History. Leiden, E.J. Brill, 2011. pp. 164-86.

'Global Design in Jingdezhen: Local Production and Global Connections' in Giorgio Riello, Glenn Adamson, and Sarah Teasley, eds., Global Design History (Routledge, 2011): 25-33.

Review of Tonio Andrade, How Taiwan became Chinese: Dutch, Spanish, and Han Colonization in the Seventeenth Century(New York, NY, Columbia University Press, 2008). See here.

Review of David Faure, Emperor and Ancestor: State and Lineage in South China in volume XLII, no. 83 (May 2009) ofHistoire sociale - Social History.

Several contributions to The European World, 1500-1800 (Routledge, 2009). See the Routledge website for details.

'Fragments of a Global Past: Sites of Ceramics Manufacture in Song-Yuan-Ming Jiangxi.' Journal of the Social and Economic History of the Orient, 2009.

'The Tale of Lady Tan: Negotiating Place Between Central and Local in Song-Yuan-Ming China, Medieval History Journal 11.2 (2008), pp. 161-186.

'Prosopography and its Potential for Middle Period Research', Journal of Song Yuan Studies 38 (2008), pp. 161-201. Available on Project Muse.

'The Hongwu Legacy: Fifteenth-Century Views on Zhu Yuanzhang's Monastic Policies' in Long Live the Emperor! Uses of the Ming Founder Across Six Centuries of East Asian History, edited by Sarah Schneewind. Ming Studies Research Series, volume 4 (Minneapolis: Society for Ming Studies, 2008), pp 55-72.

Review of Schneewind, Tale of Two Melons in Journal of Asian Studies 66.3 (2007), 832-834.

'Searching for Gentility: The Nineteenth-Century Fashion for the Late Ming' in The Quest for Gentility in China: Negotiations beyond Gender and Class, edited by Daria Berg and Chloe Starr, pp. 188-207 (London: Routledge, 2007).

Ji'an Literati and the Local in Song-Yuan-Ming China. Leiden:Brill, 2007. See the limited preview on Google Books. The book has been reviewed in Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Journal of Asian Studies, Journal of Song-Yuan Studies,Etudes chinoises 27 (2008):173-77; Xinshixue 21.4 (2010): 247-254.

'Friendship through Fourteenth-Century Fissures: Dai Liang, Wu Sidao and Ding Henian.' Nan Nü: Men, Women and Gender in China9.1 (2007), pp. 34-69.

'Shisan shiji Jiangxi Ji'an xiangcun de shenzhi chongbai—lishi xuejia de tianye diaocha' 十三世纪江西吉安乡村的神祗崇拜, Nanfang wenwu 2, pp. 131-133.

'The Many Guises of Xiaoluan: The Legacy of a Girl Poet in Late Imperial China' Journal of Women's History 17.2 (2005), pp. 38-61.

'From Demon to Deity: Kang Wang in Thirteenth-Century Jizhou and Beyond' T'oung Pao International Journal of Chinese Studies 90.1-3 (2004), pp. 4-35.

'A Thirteenth-Century Cult in the Villages of Ji'an (Jiangxi), or 'Fieldwork for Historians',' Journal of Song Yuan Studies33. pp.181-185.

'Liu Chenweng (1232-1297): Ways of Being Local.' In The Human Tradition in Premodern China, Kenneth J. Hammond, editor. (Scholarly Resources, 2002), pp. 111-125.

'Gods and Governors: Interpreting the Religious Realm in Ji'an (Jiangxi) during the Southern Song, Yuan, and Ming Dynasties' (Ph.D. thesis, Harvard University). 2001. 349 pages.

'Visions of Local Culture: Tales of the Strange and Temple Inscriptions from Song-Yuan Jizhou' Journal of Chinese Religions 28 (2000), pp. 69-92.

'Women in the Life and Thought of Ch'en Ch'üeh: The Perspective of the Seventeenth Century." in Chinese Women in the Imperial Past: New Perspectives. Harriet T. Zurndorfer, ed. Leiden: E.J.Brill, 1999), pp. 223-257.

Dr Sarah Hayes

Dr Sarah Hayes is an Australian Research Council post-doctoral fellow at La Trobe University. While predominantly a researcher, Sarah has also worked as a tutor, in the heritage sector and in consulting archaeology. Her research interests include material culture, urban and suburban archaeology, class and social mobility.

Recent publications include Good Taste, Fashion, Luxury: A Genteel Melbourne Family and Their Rubbish and A Doomed Business: The Material Culture of Ann Jones and the Glenrowan Inn. Her current projects are on social mobility and the internal variety of Melbourne's middle class, and how the gold rush shaped quality of life in Victoria.

Michael Henderson

Michael currently works as a Human Osteologist for MOLA where he has worked on a variety of multi-period human skeletal assemblages from around the UK, including Roman, Saxon, medieval and post-medieval burials in London. He has produced specialist reports on inhumation and cremation burials, both in house and for external clients and recently completed specialist text for two post-medieval burial grounds from East London and St Marylebone’s Paddington Street north burial ground. He is also a member of the British Association for Biological Anthropology and Osteoarchaeology (BABAO).

Since 2011 Michael has been involved as an osteologist on the Crossrail infrastructure project. This has included work at Liverpool Street, London, one of the largest post-medieval skeletal assemblages excavated in Britain. Michael was also a key team member for ‘Digitised Diseases’ laser scanning project in collaboration with the University of Bradford and the Royal College of surgeons and funded by JISC. He has also worked with City University Radiography Department.

His outreach work has also involved lecturing and presenting at conferences, teaching at schools and workshops, and filming and advisory roles for television documentaries. He has also completed human bone reports for the Metropolitan Police.

Publications and papers: http://mola.academia.edu/MichaelHenderson

Email: mhenderson@mola.org.uk

Dr Tracy Ireland

Dr Tracy Ireland, Associate Professor of Cultural Heritage

Tracy is an archaeologist and heritage practitioner with over 20 years experience in research, education, policy and management. Tracy joined the University of Canberra in 2009 and is Associate Professor of Cultural Heritage and Head of the Discipline of Humanities.

Tracy previously led the Canberra office of GML Heritage, lectured at the University Sydney and worked as the Archaeologist for the NSW Heritage Council. Tracy teaches units on heritage management, conservation, archaeology, material culture and ethics.

Tracy heads the Future Heritage program of the Centre for Creative and Cultural Research. Her research interests broadly cover historical archaeology, heritage practice and conservation, with particular interests in heritage ethics, the conservation of in situ archaeological remains and landscape archaeology. She is also developing a new research focus around digital and creative practice in heritage.

Tracy's most recent book is The ethics of cultural heritage, edited with John Schofield and she is Series Editor, with Cristobal Gnecco, of the Ethics in Archaeology Series for Springer. She is currently working on two major research projects: the Material Memories Project which examines the conservation of archaeological remains and urban heritage place making in settler societies, and Connecting the Nation, Australia's Aviation Heritage, a digital heritage project funded by Airservices Australia.

Tracy is a member of the Editorial Boards for Historic Environment and Australian Archaeology, was Conference Convenor for the Australia ICOMOS 2013 Centenary of Canberra National Conference and is an Expert Member of ICAHM (International Scientific Committee for Archaeological Heritage Management).

Email: Tracy Ireland

Nigel Jeffries

Nigel Jeffries is a medieval and later material culture specialist (principally ceramic, glass and clay tobacco pipe) at MOLA, who specializes in the archaeology of London from the early modern period to the 20th century. A commercial archaeologist, he works collaboratively with multi-disciplinary teams across cultural sectors in developing the approaches required for assemblage analysis and material culture studies of 18th- and 19th–century London households. He is also co-investigator with Dr Alastair Owens, from Queen Mary, University of London for an Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) speculative research award [Award Number AH/EOO2285/1] ‘Living in Victorian London: Material Histories of Everyday Life in the Nineteenth century Metropolis’.

Examples of his publications on London and the archaeology of the modern world include:

2015. Harward, C, Holder, N and Jeffries, N The Spitalfields suburb 1539–1860: excavations at Spitalfields Market, London E1, 1991–2007, MoLA Monograph Series 61 (361 pages, with contributors)

2012. Mullins, P, and Jeffries, N ‘The Banality of Gilding: Innocuous Materiality and Transatlantic Consumption in the Gilded Age’, International Journal of Historical Archaeology 16 (4), 745–60.

2010. Owens, A, Jeffries, N, Wehner, K, and Featherby, R ‘Fragments of a Modern City: Material Culture and Everyday Life in Victorian London’, in Boehm and McDonagh (eds) Journal of Victorian Culture 15 (2), 212–25

2010. Owens, A, Jeffries, N, Featherby, R, and Wehner, K From the Unusual to the Banal: the Archaeology of Everyday Life in Victorian London, Research Matters 4, Museum of London (8 page pamphlet)

2009. Jeffries, N, Owens, A, Hicks, D, Featherby, R, and Wehner, K ‘Rematerialising metropolitan histories? People, Places and Things in modern London’ in Horning and Palmer (eds.) Crossing Paths or Sharing Tracks? Future directions in the archaeological study of post-1550 Britain and Ireland, Society for Post-medieval Archaeology Monograph 5, Boydell & Brewer Ltd: Woodbridge, 323–50

2009. Jeffries, N ‘A Biography of a Stoneware Ginger Beer Bottle. The Biucchi brothers and the Ticinese Community in Nineteenth–Century London’, in C.L White (ed.) Materiality of Individuality: Archaeological Studies of Individual Lives, Springer Press: New York, 57–74

Email: njeffries@mola.org.uk

Professor Håkan Karlsson

Research

Håkan Karlsson (b. 1962). I am a professor in archaeology at the Department of Historical Studies at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. My major focus of research is the epistemology and ontology of archaeology, the contemporary political dimensions of archaeology, the relationship between heritage management and the public, and the archaeology of the contemporary past. I have just finished a project approaching the materialization of authenticity at a number of world-heritage classifies rock-art sites.

At present I am co-leader of a number of contemporary archaeological projects in Cuba and Sweden that, in co-operation with local communities, approaches different kinds of material and immaterial remains from the Cold War. These projects are; The Heritagisation of a World Crisis. The after-use of the former Soviet Missile Site at Santa Cruz delos  Pinos, Cuba. (2010-ongoing), and Command Centre Björn. A Secret Swedish cultural heritage from the Cold War. (2014-ongoing). I am also involved in a historical archaeological project in Cuba focusing the first Spanish localisation of Havana at the south coast of the island between1514-1519 (2014-ongoing).

Publications

A sample from a total number of c. 160 published texts:

  • 2015. (with Gustafsson, A.) La autenticidad en la práctica. Ejemplos desde ocho sitios con arte rupestre clasificados como patrimonio mundial. PH Investigacion n. 5.
  • 2015. (with González Hernándes, F., & Gustafsson, A.) De crisis mundial hacia un desarollo local. Un informe breve de un proyecto arqueología contemporánea sobre del patrimonio cultural de la antigua base de misiles nucleares soviéticos en Santa Cruz de los Pinos, Cuba. Cuba Arqueológica Ano VII, núm 2,
  • 2014 pp. 19-28.2014. (with Gustafsson, A.) Authenticity in Practice. A comparative study of authenticity, staging and public communication at eight World Heritage classified Rock Art sites. Bricoleur Press, Göteborg.
  • 2012. (with Gustafsson, A.) A Spectre is Haunting Swedish Archaeology - the spectre of politics. Archaeology, cultural heritage and the present political situation in Sweden. Current Swedish Archaeology, vol 19. pp. 11-36, Reply to comments, 59-63.
  • 2012. (with Gustafsson, A.) Changing of the guards. The ethics of public interpretation at cultural heritage sites. In: Carman, J., McDavid, C. & Skeates, R. (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Public Archaeology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 478-4952011. (with Burström, M. & Gustafsson, A.) World Crisis in Ruin. The Contemporary Archaeology of the Former Soviet Nuclear Missile Sites on Cuba. Bricoleur Press, Göteborg.
  • 2009. (with Burström, M. Acosta, T., Gonzáles, E., Gustafsson, A., Hernández, I, Pajón, J. M. & Robaina, R) Memories of a World Crisis. The archaeology of a former Soviet nuclear missile site in Cuba. Journal of SocialArchaeology. pp. 295-318.
  • 2006. (with Burström, M. & Gustafsson, A.) The Air Torpedo of Bäckebo. Local incident and world history. CurrentSwedish Archaeology. Vol 14, pp. 7-24.
  • 2005. Why is there material Culture Rather than Nothing. In: Funari, P.P.A, Zarankin, A. & Stovel, E. (eds) GlobalArchaeological Theory.Email: Håkan Karlsson.

Sarah Kautz

I am a historical archaeologist completing my dissertation at the University of Chicago's Department of Anthropology. My research interests include the comparative analysis of the rise of early global maritime commerce and how its legacies are understood, commemorated, and silenced in academic and popular narratives today. Specifically, my work explores how material practices of exchange and hospitality reveal concepts like value and sovereignty, processes of commensuration and commensality, and cultures of transaction.

My dissertation uses archaeological data, documentary evidence, and historical images to explore how expectations for and practices of exchange and hospitality at Dejima, an artificial island where Dutch East India Company personnel and Western traders were cloistered from 1641-1853, reflect the shifting stakes of early global maritime commerce in Japan. Please follow this link to read a blog post about my research in Japan: https://socialsciences.uchicago.edu/blog/student/rediscovering-dejima-my-journey-through-early-modern-japans-window-west

I believe we can do a great deal to improve the availability of archaeological data and collections for both professionals and the public. So I am especially excited to be a part of the team from the Museum of the City of New York and the Landmarks Preservation Commission building a searchable online database for collections at the New York City Archaeology Repository. This database unifies information about materials excavated from sites across New York City and will eventually provide access for researchers, educators, museum curators, and the public. I anticipate the database will also contribute towards expanding our understanding of New York City's development as a global entrepot. Please visit the Repository project's blog for more information: http://blog.mcny.org/category/archaeology-project/

Joakim Kjellberg

I am a PhD student at the department of Archaeology and Ancient History at Uppsala University, Sweden. My primary research interests are centered on urbanism and material culture. This is also the focus for my current project titled "Materializing urbanism – social identities and networks in a Swedish medieval townscape, 1100-1550 AD". My research background relate to topics such as: agency and group identity construction in past societies as well as the modern world, materiality and consumption, urban spaces, network dynamics and applications of social theories in archaeology.  I also have a special interest in public outreach archaeology and interdisciplinary use of archaeological data.

My current employment is a faculty grant position as PhD student in Uppsala for five years, including 1 year of courses at advanced level, pedagogical training courses, 20% teaching and assistant supervision at undergraduate and advanced level. The focus of my teaching is on Medieval- and Historical archaeology. I am also a lecturer on archaeological methods and fieldpractices.

I returned to academia in 2013 from a solid background as a museum- and field-archaeologist for more than 10 years, working for various museums and corporations in Sweden and abroad. I have regularly given presentations at conferences as well as published papers in national and international journals on topics of urban archaeology, urban GIS, the archaeology of churches and Early Modern funerary practices. I am also chairman and head of the editorial board of the restarted publication of META- Historisk arkeologisk tidskrift- a journal that since 1979 have been central in historical archaeological debates in Scandinavia.

http://www.arkeologi.uu.se/Research/Presentations/joakim-kjellberg/

Email: Joakim Kjellberg

Paul Lane

Paul Lane is Professor of Global Archaeology at Uppsala University, where he also coordinates the Marie Curie-Skłodowska Resilience in East African Landscapes Innovative Training Network. He is a specialist in the later archaeology of sub-Saharan Africa, having worked in West, East and southern Africa for over twenty-five years. He is a member of Council of the Royal Anthropological Institute and British Institute in Eastern Africa, a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London and a former President of the Society of Africanist Archaeologists (2008-10).

His research interests include the historical ecology of African landscapes with particular reference to the 19th century trade in elephant ivory, the archaeology of enslavement in eastern Africa, the archaeology of colonial encounters in African contexts, the materialisation of memory, and maritime archaeology in the western Indian Ocean and Red Sea zones. One of his particular concerns at present is to develop multi-sited study of the archaeology of global commodity chains and their socio-ecological consequences through critical scrutiny of artefact and personal biographies, processes of assemblage and the aesthetics of taste.

His publications include The Oxford Handbook of African Archaeology (2013, co-edited with Peter Mitchell), Slavery in Africa: Archaeology and Memory (2011, co-edited with Kevin MacDonald), and African Historical Archaeologies (2004, co-edited with Andrew Reid).

Assoc. Prof Susan Lawrence

Assoc. Prof Susan Lawrence specialises in studies of material culture, gender, and the social archaeology of industry, funded by six ARC Discovery and Linkage grants totalling over one million dollars.

Lawrence has written 3 monographs, edited 6 books and published 53 peer-reviewed articles and chapters. She is a past–president of the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology, has been on the Heritage Council of Victoria's Archaeology Advisory Committee for over a decade, and was elected to the Australian Academy of the Humanities in 2011 and to the Society of Antiquaries of London in 2012. Her current research is on the archaeology of Anthropocene rivers.

Matthew J Liebmann

My primary research focuses on the archaeology of the Southwest U.S., with a specialization in the contact period and the historic-era Pueblos of New Mexico. I am particularly interested in the changes to Indigenous life that occurred during the 17th century following the arrival of Europeans into the northern Rio Grande region. More generally, my research interests include the archaeology of colonialism; revitalization movements; the material culture of conversion and apostasy; archaeologies of resistance; postcolonial theory; and NAGPRA.

The main subject matter of my research has been the archaeology of the Pueblo Revolt era (1680-1700) in the Jemez Province of New Mexico. Over the past decade I have investigated the ways in which the Jemez people revitalized and memorialized their identities in the wake of the uprising of 1680. As a result, my research explores the materiality of revitalization movements, examining the instantiation of nativism and revivalism in the archaeological record.

Methodologically, I am committed to collaboration with descendant communities and improving relations among archaeologists and Native Americans. A vital component of my work entails collaboration with the Pueblo of Jemez (particularly the Jemez Department of Resource Protection), and I work with tribal members in the formulation of research designs, data collection, interpretation, and presentation of the final results. We tend to use non-invasive techniques as part of our research methods, and as a result I have developed a secondary interest in 'surface archaeology' and archaeological survey and mapping techniques that combine elements of large-scale, 'landscape' archaeology with more traditional, site-based investigations.

http://anthropology.fas.harvard.edu/people/matthew-liebmann

Email: Matthew Liebmann

Kent G Lightfoot

Kent G. Lightfoot is Professor of Anthropology and Class of 1960 Chair in Undergraduate Education at the University of California, Berkeley.  Trained in the field of North American archaeology, he specializes in the study of late pre-colonial people and their subsequent encounters with diverse European colonial regimes.  After receiving his B.A. in Anthropology from Stanford University (1975), and his Ph.D. in Anthropology from Arizona State University (1981), he taught at Northern Illinois University (1982) and the SUNY at Stony Brook (1982-1987), before joining the faculty at UC Berkeley in 1987.  He currently serves as the Curator of North American Archaeology in the Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology and as a Faculty Associate of the Archaeological Research Facility on the Berkeley campus.

Lightfoot has directed archaeological projects in New England, the American Southwest, and along the Pacific Coast of North America. In the last ten years he has focused his studies on the impressive shell mounds of the greater San Francisco Bay, the Russian colony of Fort Ross (1812-1843) and nearby historic Spanish missions in northern California, and landscape management practices employed by complex hunter-hunters in central California.  These collaborative research programs, involving local tribes, state and national parks, and students and faculty from a diverse range of fields, have been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature, and the Joint Fire Science Program.  The inter-disciplinary nature of this work has been facilitated by the Berkeley Initiative in Global Change Biology at UC Berkeley.  Lightfoot and his collaborators have published their work in a series of book chapters and journal articles, including a special issue of California Archaeology (2013). Lightfoot's recent books include Indians, Missionaries, and Merchants: The Legacy of Colonial Encounters on the California Frontiers (2005, UC Press) and California Indians and their Environments: An Introduction (with Otis Parrish) (2009, UC Press).

During his tenure as a Guggenheim Fellow (2014-2015) and Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) at Stanford University (2014-2015), Lightfoot worked on a new theoretical perspective for understanding complex hunter-gatherers in California that synthesizes a wealth of recent information about their sophisticated management practices designed to enhance the biodiversity and sustainability of biotic communities.  He is currently exploring how these strategies of diversification may have differed fundamentally from other Native American populations involved primarily in agrarian production.  In collaboration with members of his research team, he is evaluating how these indigenous enhancement practices may provide new insights for policies and practices currently employed in the management of open spaces and wild lands in California.

http://anthropology.berkeley.edu/people/kent-lightfoot

Email: Kent Lightfoot

Gavin Lucas

Gavin Lucas is Professor of Archaeology at the University of Iceland where he has been teaching since 2006. He originally moved from England to Iceland in 2002 to work for an independent research organization, the Institute of Archaeology and with whom he still collaborates on research projects.

He has conducted fieldwork in many places around the world, but his main research has been in South Africa and now Iceland. In South Africa he excavated several sites from the 18th to 20th century in the Cape, the results of which were published as An Archaeology of Colonial Identity (Springer, 2005). Currently he is writing up the results of a major settlement excavation in Iceland dating from the late 17th to early 20th century.

His major books include:

  • Critical Approaches to Fieldwork (Routledge, 2001)
  • Archaeologies of the Contemporary Past (with Victor Buchli; Routledge 2001)
  • The Archaeology of Time (Routledge, 2005)
  • Understanding the Archaeological Record (Cambridge University Press, 2012).

His research interests lie in the history and theory of archaeology, as well as the archaeology of the modern world.

Email: gavin@hi.is

Webpage: http://starfsfolk.hi.is/en/simaskra/3199

Prof Richard Mackay, AM

Richard Mackay is the founder and 'Director of Possibilities' at Mackay Strategic. Richard has worked in cultural heritage management for more than 30 years. He was a founding Partner of GML Heritage Pty Ltd, one of Australia's leading heritage consulting practices.

Richard was an ICOMOS cultural advisor at the most-recent Session of the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, and is the immediate past Chair of the Australian World Heritage Advisory Committee and current Chair of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area Advisory Committee. He was a member of the Australian State of the Environment 2011 Committee, and will also be responsible for the 'Heritage' theme of the 2016 Commonwealth State of the Environment report. Richard is also a former member of Australia ICOMOS Burra Charter Working Party, former Non-executive Director of the National Trust in NSW, a former member of the Heritage Council of NSW and was the inaugural Chair of the NSW State Heritage Register Committee.

Richard has extensive skills in facilitation and strategic direction of heritage projects and place management throughout Australia and in Asia. He has worked successfully for government and non-government agencies and corporations, devising innovative but practical solutions to complex cultural heritage challenges at places ranging from Angkor, Cambodia to Sydney's Luna Park. He has pioneered public archaeology and community participation programs, fostered cultural tourism and sustainable livelihoods, advised senior levels of government, provided expert testimony in multiple jurisdictions and published widely on archaeology, conservation and heritage management.

Richard was the inaugural winner of the Australian Heritage Council 'Sharon Sullivan Award' for his contribution to Australia's national heritage. In 2003 he was made a Member in the General Division of the Order of Australia for services to archaeology and cultural heritage.

Jacob McCahon

I hold a law degree from La Trobe University, and was admitted to the Supreme Court of Victoria in February 2016. I have experience working in commercial law and enjoy a range of legal areas. I am currently employed by La Trobe University as part of its Graduate Development Program.

JACOB MCCAHON

0402 475 816

jacobmccahon1@gmail.com

OVERVIEW

I hold a law degree from La Trobe University, and was admitted to the Supreme Court of Victoria in February 2016. I have experience working in commercial law and enjoy a range of legal areas. I am currently employed by La Trobe University as part of its Graduate Development Program.

EDUCATION

Jul to Dec            Graduate Diploma in Practical Legal Training (PLT)

2015                     Leo Cussen Centre for Law

  • Admitted on 23 February 2016

Mar 2011 to         Bachelor of Laws (Graduate Entry)

Dec 2014             La Trobe University

  • Completed with a Distinction Average (75.14)
  • Achieved High Distinctions in Dispute Resolution, Principles of Public Law, Contract Law B, Foundations of Property Law, Law of Equity and Trusts and Criminal Justice

Mar 2008 to         Bachelor of Arts

Dec 2010             University of Melbourne

  • Completed with a Distinction Average (70.04)
  • Achieved High Distinctions in Australia Now and Researching Australia:

Issues, Agendas

2007                       Victorian Certificate of Education

Caulfield Grammar School

  • Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR): 96.65
  • Awarded Certificate of Excellence, at the Gold Level, for achieving distinction

in the fields of Academic Achievement, School Service and Leadership,

Community Service, Sports and The Arts

CURRENT EMPLOYMENT

Dec 2015 to         Graduate Development Program

Dec 2016              La Trobe University

  • One of 10 former students chosen from cohort to undertake important University

Projects during three four-month rotations.

  • Received complimentary feedback for completing a range of tasks, including:

legal checklists for Contracts Team and Definitions section for Research Manual

LEGAL EXPERIENCE

Nov to Dec           Professional Legal Placement

2015                      Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal

  • Observed matters in Civil Claims, Residential Tenancies, Building and

Property, Review and Regulation and Human Rights Lists

  • Conducted legal research into key Building Act and Corporations Act provisions, created Draft Orders and contributed to VCAT Self-Help Initiative

Jun 2015              Work experience

County Court of Victoria

  • Observed and assisted Judges and Judge's Associates in various proceedings

May 2015 to         Barrister shadowing

present                John Leung (Commercial Barrister: Owen Dixon Chambers East)

  • Assist Mr Leung in a range of commercial law matters by conducting legal research and locating probative case law

Mar to Jun          Graduate Legal Intern

  1. 2015            Stenta Legal
  • Conducted extensive legal research and statutory interpretation
  • Completed various tasks in commercial property law including assistance in

VCAT proceedings

  • Received positive feedback from Principal after researching and reporting on:

- A chronology of seminal torts judgments in Australia;

- Current Land Tax provisions in New South Wales;

- Advising client who has suffered personal property damage.

  • Quickly met technology-related expectations

Feb to Apr           Paralegal

2015                     Brown and Co Lawyers and Consultants

  • Audited large volumes of discovered documents and summarised findings
  • Performed auditing task in a variety of matters, including Cricket Australia

medical negligence claim, large family trust dispute and allegation relating to

damaged antiques

Jan 2015               Seasonal Clerkship

Tisher Liner FC Law

  • Conducted extensive legal research and statutory interpretation
  • Completed tasks in commercial, property and employment law
  • Received positive feedback from Partners after researching and reporting on:

- Public company's disclosure obligations when making changes

to its Constitution;

- Payment of GST in a mortgagee sale;

- Obligations of an employer in relation to Paid Parental Leave.

Nov 2013 to           Intern

Jul 2014                 Lennon Mazzeo Lawyers

  • Conducted extensive legal research and statutory interpretation
  • Worked collaboratively with a diverse group of people: clients,

legal assistants, solicitors, partners and barristers

  • Completed administrative tasks, including: compiling briefs for barristers, delivering court documents and ensuring safe and neat storage of files
  • Received positive feedback from Partners after researching and reporting on:

- Whether assault at work constitutes a workplace injury;

- Scope of landlord liability in relation to maintenance of rental premises;

- The implications of issuing a Statutory Demand.

Jan to Dec            Intern

2013                      Hall and Petranis Lawyers

  • Completed tasks in probate, trust accounting and property law
  • Liaised with clients and communicated with relevant authorities over

the phone and in meetings

OTHER EMPLOYMENT

Jan 2008 to          Caulfield Grammar School (Malvern Campus)

Dec 2013              Sports Coach

  • Independently supervised young students, taught them skills and

encouraged good behaviour

  • Mentored junior coaches and work experience students in relation to

preparing for and effectively executing coaching sessions

  • Liaised with parents, fellow coaches and teaching staff

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

  • Active member of the Caulfield Grammarian Law Students' Association – 'The Other Club'
  • Active participant in a number of community sporting organisations, namely: the Caulfield Cricket Club, Ardrie Park Tennis Club, Caulfield Grammarians Football Club and the Glenhuntly Athletics Club
  • Represented Glenhuntly in the Premier Division of the 2015 Cross Country and

Athletics season (winning 'Best Newcomer')

EXTRA CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

2015                    Optional Advocacy Program – Leo Cussen Centre for Law

  • Took part in program to strengthen advocacy skills
  • Taught by distinguished advocates, including Max Perry
  • Competed against Victoria Police Prosecutors in mock trials

2015                    Tarrwirri Indigenous Law Conference 2015

  • One of two students representing Leo Cussen Centre for Law
  • Attended forums and events and liaised with guest speakers

2015                    High School Mooting Competition

  • Criminal law mooting competition featuring students from across Victoria
  • Chosen to act as a judge
  • Hosted by La Trobe University
  • Analysed relevant legal arguments and gave students constructive

feedback following oral submissions

2014                    Hon. Michael Kirby Contract Law Moot

  • Distinguished legal figures acting as judges
  • One of four students selected to represent La Trobe University
  • Took part in four rounds against students from universities across Australia

2014                    La Trobe University Witness Examination Competition

  • Courtroom setting
  • Methodically examined own witness in Examination in Chief
  • Critically examined opposition witness in Cross-Examination

2013                     La Trobe University Criminal Law Mooting Competition

  • Worked in teams of two to research and present submissions on a scenario where the accused has been charged with murder
  • Finished Runner Up after making Grand Final, held at The Federal Court

HOBBIES AND INTERESTS

  • Enjoy sports, art, film, television, music and politics
  • Enjoy being a fit, enthusiastic, sociable and positive person

REFEREES

  • Available on request

Gabriel Moshenska

Gabriel Moshenska is a public archaeologist based at UCL Institute of Archaeology in London. His interests in the archaeology of the modern world are based on his PhD research which focused on the interplay between the archaeology, material culture and memory of the Second World War in the UK. This work was primarily based on studying the civilian experience of conflict rather than a military approach, and included a substantial amount of work on the archaeology of air raid shelters and civil defence more generally.

Alongside this work in historical archaeology and heritage, Gabriel works on a number of different topics including the history of British archaeology; the history and philosophy of archaeological science; archaeological and antiquarian themes in horror fiction; and the contested interpretation of Milton's theological writings in the early nineteenth century.

Much of his recent work in the archaeology of the modern world has focused on methodological issues, including a long-term project on the conceptual and practical connections between reverse engineering and the archaeology of industrial and post-industrial periods. He recently published a study of a USB memory stick found on an excavation in London, including a discussion of its mixed (and partly pornographic) content, as well as the ethical problems facing archaeologists in the digital era.

Gabriel has two main on-going projects in the archaeology of the modern world. The first is focused on children and the material culture of conflict, examining the ways in which children have adapted and adapted to the material traces of modern warfare including interactions with bombed buildings, shrapnel and bullets, gas masks and air raid shelters. This work is an historical ethnography drawing mainly on oral history archives.

The second on-going project is a wide-ranging study of air raid shelters, primarily focusing on the archaeology, history and preservation of Second World War-era shelters in London, but with a growing international perspective. This work has included numerous excavations, non-invasive surveys and recording of public and private air raid shelters; consultancy on heritage and development projects in Britain and Spain; and a growing body of research on the political, artistic, scientific and sociological dimensions of air raid protection. Gabriel is very keen to hear from colleagues around the world with related interests, for developing possible collaborative projects.http://www.ucl.ac.uk/archaeology/people/staff/moshenska

Tim Murray

Tim Murray is Charles La Trobe Professor of Archaeology at La Trobe University and Director of the centre for the Archaeology of the Modern Worlds. A practicing archaeologist with an interest in history and epistemology, his research and publication has focused on the history and philosophy of archaeology, the archaeology of the modern world, and heritage archaeology.

His most recent books include World AntiquarianismComparative Perspectives (co-edited with Alain Schnapp, Lothar von Falkenhausen and Peter Miller, Getty Research Institute, 2013), An Archaeology of Institutional Confinement. The Hyde Park Barracks, 1848-1886 (co-authored with Peter Davies and Penny Crook, Sydney University Press, 2013), and From Antiquarian to Archaeologist: The history and philosophy of archaeology (Pen and Sword Press, 2014). His current projects are based around the general theme of transnational archaeologies in the long 19th century, with particular focus on 'contact' archaeology, urban archaeology and technology transfer, and demonstrating the importance of the history of archaeology for building more robust archaeological theory.

http://www.latrobe.edu.au/humanities/about/staff/profile?uname=TAMurray

Email: Tim Murray

Charles E Orser, Jr

CURRICULUM VITAE

Charles E. Orser, Jr.

PERSONAL

Professional address: Department of Anthropology, 124 Garland Hall, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; charles.e.orser@vanderbilt.edu

Home address:  6957 Stone Run Drive, Nashville, TN 37211

Professional title: Research Professor

Additional titles: Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Illinois State University; Adjunct Research Professor, Department of Anthropology, University at Albany (SUNY); Adjunct Professor, National University of Ireland, Galway

EDUCATION

Ph.D., anthropology, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, 1980

Dissertation title: An Archaeological and Historical Socioeconomic Analysis of Arikara Mortuary Practice

M.A., anthropology, Wayne State University, Detroit, 1975

Thesis title: The Kolmer Site: An Eighteenth-Century Michigamea Village

B.S., history, (geology, English literature minors), Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, 1972

EMPLOYMENT

August 1, 2013 to present, Research Professor, Department of Anthropology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

February 7, 2008 to July 31, 2013, Curator of Historical Archaeology, New York State Museum, University of the State of New York, Albany, New York

August 16, 1999 to December 31, 2007, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Illinois State University

August 16, 1994 to August 16, 1999, Professor of Anthropology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Illinois State University

June 5, 1989, to August 15, 1994, Associate Professor of Anthropology, and Director, Midwestern Archaeological Research Center, Illinois State University

August 18, 1988, to May 19, 1989, Associate Professor of Anthropology (tenured). Department of Geography and Anthropology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

August 17, 1983, to August 17, 1988, Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Department of Geography and Anthropology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

January 15, to April 30, 1985, Adjunct Faculty, Division of Continuing Education, University of St. Francis, Joliet, Illinois (for course taught in Baton Rouge, Louisiana

September 1, 1982, to June 30, 1983, Visiting Assistant Professor, Anthropology Program, University of South Dakota, Vermillion

July 21, 1980, to June 30, 1982, Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Loyola University of Chicago

August 6, 1979, to July 18, 1980, Assistant State Archaeologist, Michigan History Division, Michigan Department of State, Lansing

SPECIAL AND VISITING APPOINTMENTS

Visiting Professor, Department of Historical Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, May 2016

Visiting Professor, Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand, October-November 2011

Adjunct Professor, Department of Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway, 2010-present

Visiting Professor, Department of Archaeology, University College Dublin, Ireland, 2007-present

External Ph.D. Examiner, University of Queensland, Australia, 2000

Adjunct Professor, Department of Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway, 1994-2004

Research Associate, Department of Anthropology, The Field Museum, Chicago, 1993-2003

External Ph.D. Examiner, University of New England, Armidale, Australia, 1996

Visiting Professor, Department of Archaeology, University of Lund, Sweden, 1996

Visiting Professor, Department of Archaeology, and the Culture and Colonialism Program, National University of Ireland, Galway, 1995

Member, Advisory Board, Culture and Colonialism Program, National University of Ireland, Galway, 1994-95

Invited participant, School of American Research Advanced Seminar, "The Historical Archaeology of Capitalism," organized and chaired by Mark P. Leone and Parker B. Potter, Jr., 1993

Visiting Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 1988

AWARDS AND FELLOWSHIPS

Faculty of Arts Fellowship, Department of Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway, 2002

Distinguished Professor, Illinois State University, 1999-2007

Arts and Science Lecturer, Illinois State University, 1998; Lecture: An Archaeological Look at Race and Tradition in Pre-Famine Ireland, November

Founding Member, Delta Alpha Chapter, Phi Beta Delta, Honor Society for International Scholars, Illinois State University, 1997

Outstanding University Researcher Award, Illinois State University, 1997

Outstanding College Researcher Award, Illinois State University, 1995

Faculty of Arts Fellowship, Department of Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway, 1995

Half-Million Club, for obtaining grants in excess of $500,000, Illinois State University, 1992

Award for Outstanding Research Accomplishments by a Non-Tenured Faculty Member, Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, Louisiana State University Chapter, 1987

Summer Research Faculty Stipend, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 1984

Dissertation Research Award, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, 1978-79

Graduate/Professional Award, Wayne State University, 1974-75

Michigan Higher Education Scholarship, 1971-72

RESEARCH GRANT OUTLINE

Funds generated from Field School in Historical Archaeology (Ireland) . . . . . . $  615,684.00

Grants and contracts (Illinois State University) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $  697,383.00

Grants pre Illinois State University (Louisiana State U; Loyola U) . . . . . . . . . $  418,500.00

Total funds generated 1981-present  . . . . . . .$1,731,567.00

COURSES TAUGHT

Historical Archaeology (created; undergrad/grad)

Archaeology of Slavery (undergrad/grad)

Archaeological Theory (grad)

Archaeological Ethics and Law (grad)

Archaeological Thinking (undergrad)

Material Culture (undergrad/grad)

Archaeological Field School (undergrad)

Advanced Archaeological Field School (grad)

Theory, Interpretation, and Archaeology (National University of Ireland, Galway)

North American Prehistory (undergrad)

The Archaeology of the Inarticulate (grad seminar)

Key Concepts in Anthropology (grad)

North American Indians (undergrad)

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (undergrad)

Cultures of the World (undergrad)

ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXCAVATIONS AND SURVEYS DIRECTED

2013            August; Co-director (with Pedro Funari and Lúcio Menezes Ferreira), survey of beef jerky plantations and maroon communities, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

2010            June; Co-director (with Maggie Ronayne), mapping at Lios an Rú deserted village, Ballyvaughan, County Clare, Republic of Ireland.

2007            July; Director, excavation at Brogan House, Derrylahan townland, Glenveagh National Park, County Dongeal, Republic of Ireland.

2006            June-August; Director, excavation at Glenveagh Cottage, Glenveagh National Park, County Donegal, Republic of Ireland.

2005            August, Preliminary geophysical testing at Glenveagh Cottage, Glenveagh National Park, County Donegal, Republic of Ireland.

2005            June-August; Director, excavation at Barlow's Field, County Sligo, Republic of Ireland; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

2004            June-August; Director, excavation at Coopershill House, County Sligo, Republic of Ireland; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

2003            June-August; Director, excavation at Coopershill House, County Sligo, Republic of Ireland; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

2002            June-August; Director, excavation at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, Republic of Ireland; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

2001            June-August; Director, excavation at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, Republic of Ireland; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

2000            June-August; Director, excavation at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, Republic of Ireland; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1999            July-August; Director, excavation at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, Republic of Ireland; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1998            June-July; Director, excavation at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, Republic of Ireland; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1997            June-August; Director, excavation at Mulliviltrin, County Roscommon, Republic of Ireland; funded by the Famine Commemorative Commission of the Office of the (Irish) Taoiseach; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1996            June-August; Director, Ireland Before the Famine, excavation at the Murray Site, Gorttoose, County Roscommon, Republic of Ireland; funded by the Famine Commemorative Commission of the Office of the Taoiseach, Irish Office of Public Works through the National Committee for Archaeology, and Earthwatch; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1995            July; Co-director, with Kevin Barton, Applied Geophysics Unit, National University of Ireland, Galway; magnetic susceptibility survey of Gorttoose, County Roscommon, Republic of Ireland

1994            June-July; Director, survey and surface collection at Gorttoose, County Roscommon, Republic of Ireland; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1993            July; Principal Investigator, excavation at Palmares, Serra da Barriga, State of Alagoas, Brazil; funded by the National Geographic Society and the Social Science Research Council

1993            May-June; Director, excavation at Lytleville, Illinois; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1992            July; Principal Investigator, preliminary archaeological investigation at Palmares, Serra da Barriga, State of Alagoas, Brazil; funded by the National Geographic Society and the Illinois State University Research Office

1992            May-June; Principal Investigator, archaeological survey of sites related to the Irish settlement on the Illinois and Michigan Canal; funded by the Irish Research Fund, Irish American Cultural Institute, St. Paul

1990            July-July; Director, excavation at Pleasant Hill, Illinois; Illinois State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1989            February-May; Principal Investigator; excavation at Ashland-Belle Helene Plantation, Louisiana; funded by the Division of Archaeology, State of Louisiana

1987            May-July; Director, excavation at The Laboratory (Tabasco Brand Pepper Sauce factory), Avery Island, Louisiana; funded by the McIlhenny Company, Avery Island; Louisiana State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1986            June-July; Principal Investigator, excavation at Marsh House, Petite Anse Plantation, Avery Island, Louisiana; funded by Avery Island, Inc.; Louisiana State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1985            September; Principal Investigator, excavation of the Amanda Clark House, Shreveport, Louisiana; funded by the Division of Archaeology, State of Louisiana

1985            June-August; Director, excavation at Magnolia Mound Plantation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Louisiana State University Field School in Historical Archaeology

1984            May-July; Principal Investigator; excavation at Oakley Plantation, Audubon State Commemorative Area, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; funded by the Division of Archaeology, State of Louisiana

1984            April; Co-Principal Investigator (with Douglas W. Owsley); salvage excavation at the St. Peter Street Cemetery, New Orleans, Louisiana

1980-82       Principal Investigator; excavation at Millwood Plantation, Abbeville County, South Carolina and Elbert County, Georgia; funded by the National Park Service, Atlanta

1979            April; Field Director; excavation at the Brouillet House, Vincennes, Indiana; funded by the Old Northwest Corporation; principal investigator: Russell E. Lewis

1977            May-August; Field Director; excavation at the Old Shawneetown Bank Site, Old Shawneetown, Illinois; funded by the Illinois Department of Conservation; principal investigator: Edward B. Jelks

1975            June-August; Field Director, excavation at Fort de Chartres, Randolph County, Illinois; funded by the Illinois Department of Conservation; principal investigator: Margaret K. Brown

1975            August; Field Director, excavation at Fort Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Illinois; funded by the Illinois Department of Conservation; principal investigator: Margaret K. Brown

NON-FIELDWORK PROJECTS DIRECTED

1992            January-December; Principal Investigator, archival research in relation to Irish immigrant settlement on the Illinois and Michigan Canal, Illinois; funded by the Irish American Cultural Institute, St. Paul, and the South Side Irish Parade and Heritage Foundation, Chicago

1986-87       December-January; Principal Investigator; Oral History Project, Salt Mine Village, Avery Island, Louisiana; funded by the International Salt Company, Avery Island, Louisiana

1982-83       September-June; Principal Investigator, Cultural Resources Survey and Inventory of all Indian lands in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska; funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, South Dakota Area Office, Aberdeen

1982-83       November-May; Co-Principal Investigator (with Karen Zimmerman) for archival and curatorial work, James Cook and Harold Cook Archival Project; funded by the National Park Service, Omaha

OTHER ARCHAEOLOGICAL EXPERIENCE

1971-74       Archaeological field research projects with University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois Department of Conservation, Detroit Historical Commission, Northwestern University, Illinois Department of Transportation, National Trust for Historical Preservation, Michigan State University

GOVERNMENT APPOINTMENTS

Chair, Town of Normal, Illinois, Historic Preservation Commission, 1990-93

Member, Illinois Historic Sites Advisory Council, 1990

Member, Louisiana Archaeological Survey and Antiquities Commission, 1985-88; appointed  by governor

MEMBERSHIPS IN MAJOR PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

World Archaeological Congress

Society for American Archaeology

Society for Historical Archaeology

Society for Post-Medieval Archaeology

Society of Australasian Historical Archaeology

Forum for European Expansion and Global Interaction

CURRENT EDITORSHIPS

Founder and editor, International Journal of Historical Archaeology; 1996-present

Founding editor, book series, Contributions to Global Historical Archaeology, Springer, New York; 1995-present (30+ volumes in series to date)

Co-founding editor (with Michael Brian Schiffer), Manuals in Archaeological Method, Theory, and Technique, Springer, New York; 1997-present (4 volumes in series to date)

Editorial Advisory Board, Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology, 2010-present
Editorial Advisory Board, Post-Medieval Archaeology, 2005-present

Editorial Advisory Board, Australasian Historical Archaeology, 2011-present

Editorial Board, Cadernos do Lepaarq, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Brazil, 2003-present

Editorial Board, Arqueologia Pública, Universidade de Campinas, Brazil, 2006-present

Editorial Board, Journal of African Diaspora Archaeology and Heritage, 2011-present

Editorial Board, "Historical Archaeology in South America," University of Alabama Press, 2014-present

Ediorial Board, Revista de Arqueologia Pública Unicamp, University of Campinas, Brazil, 2014-present

PAST EDITORSHIPS

Senior Editor, Scientific American Discovering Archaeology, 2000-2001

Editorial Board, Irish Studies Review, 2001-2010

Regional editor, African American Archaeology, 1991-95

Founding newsletter editor, World Archaeological Congress Newsletter, 1991-95

Editorial Board and Associate Editor, Illinois Archaeology, 1990-92

Current Research Editor for the Gulf States, Society for Historical Archaeology Newsletter, 1988-89

Book Review Editor, Plains Anthropologist, 1986-89

OTHER SERVICE TO PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Elected member, Board of Directors, Society for Historical Archaeology, 1996-98

Organizational liaison for the Society for Historical Archaeology to the World Archaeological Congress, 1991-97

Member, Ad-Hoc Committee for International Distribution of Journals, Society for Historical Archaeology, 1994-95

Member, Secretariat, World Archaeological Congress, 1991-95

Member, Planning Committee, International Congress of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, 1993-94

Member, Ad-Hoc Committee on Gender Issues, Society for Historical Archaeology, 1991-93

Member, National Membership Committee, Society for Historical Archaeology, 1989-93

Member, Membership Certification Committee, Documents Research, Society of Professional Archaeologists, 1989-91

Membership Coordinator for Louisiana, Society for Historical Archaeology, 1983-89

Member, Membership Certification Committee, Historical Archaeology, Society of Professional Archaeologists, 1984-87

Membership Coordinator for South Dakota, Society for Historical Archaeology, 1982

Chair, Historic Sites Committee, Illinois Archaeological Survey, 1978-81

SYMPOSIUM CHAIR OR MODERATOR

1999            Invited organizer, symposium "Race and the Archaeology of Identity" as part of the University of Utah Press series Foundations of Archaeological Inquiry, Salt Lake City

1992            Co-organizer and chair. Historical Archaeology: The End of Subordination.@ EuroTAG (Theoretical Archaeology Group), Southampton, England

1989            Co-chair. "Evidence from Burials in Archaeological Interpretations." First Inter-Congress, World Archaeological Congress, Vermillion, South Dakota

1989            Co-organizer. Twenty-seventh Annual Workshop in Illinois Archaeology. Illinois Archaeological Survey Annual Meeting, Normal, Illinois

1989            Session organizer and chair. "Non-Traditional Sources in Historical Archaeology." Twenty-seventh Annual Workshop in Illinois Archaeology, Normal, Illinois

1987            Roundtable moderator. "Ethnohistory." Forty-fifth Plains Anthropological Conference, Columbia, Missouri

1984            Session moderator. "Plantations in World Perspective." First World Plantation Conference, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge

1983            Session organizer and chair. "Recent Research at Southern Plantations." Fortieth Southeastern Archaeological Conference, Columbia, South Carolina

1980            Co-organizer and co-chair. "Archaeological Approaches to Plains Ethnohistory." Thirty-eighth Plains Anthropological Conference, Iowa City, Iowa

PUBLICATIONS

a. Books, authored

In preparation In This Unquiet Age: An Archaeology of the Seventeenth-Century English Atlantic World. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

In press Historical Archaeology. 3rd edition. Routledge, London. (January 2016)

2015 Archaeological Thinking: How to Make Sense of the Past. Rowman and Littlefield, Lanham, MD. (peer reviewed)

2014 A Primer on Modern-World Archaeology. Eliot Werner Press, Clinton Corners, NY. (peer reviewed).

2007 The Archaeology of Race and Racialization in Historic America. University Press of Florida, Gainesville. (peer reviewed)

2004 Historical Archaeology. 2nd edition. Prentice-Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ. (peer reviewed)

2003 Race and Practice in Archaeological Interpretation. University of Pennsylvania Press,Philadelphia. (peer reviewed)

2000 Introducción a la Arqueología Histórica. Translated by Andrés Zarankin. Asociación Amigos del Instituto Nacional de Antropología, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

1996 A Historical Archaeology of the Modern World. Plenum Press, New York. (peer reviewed)

1995        (senior author with Brian M. Fagan). Historical Archaeology. HarperCollins, New York. (peer reviewed)

1992 Introdução à arqueologia histórica. Translated by Pedro Paulo A. Funari. Oficina de Livros, Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

1988 The Material Basis of the Postbellum Tenant Plantation: Historical Archaeology in the South Carolina Piedmont. University of Georgia Press, Athens. Nominated for the James Mooney Award, and the Society of Architectural Historians, Southeast Chapter Award. (peer reviewed)

b. Books,edited

2015        (with Pedro P. A. Funari). Current Perspectives on the Archaeology of African Slavery in Latin America. Springer, New York.

2006        (editor) Unearthing Hidden Ireland: Historical Archaeology in County Roscommon. Wordwell Press, Bray, Ireland.

2005          (second editor with Pedro P. A. Funari and Solange Nunes de Oliveira Schiavetto). Identidades, Discurso e Poder: Estudos da arqueologia contemporâanea. FAPESP, São Paulo, Brazil.

2004 (junior editor with Thomas C. Patterson). Foundations of Social Archaeology: Selected Writings of V. Gordon Childe. Altamira Press, Walnut Creek, California. (peer reviewed)

2002(editor). Encyclopedia of Historical Archaeology. Routledge, London. (peer reviewed)

2001 (editor). Race and the Archaeology of Identity. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City. (peer reviewed)

1996        (editor). Images of the Recent Past: Readings in Historical Archaeology. Altamira, Walnut Creek, California. (peer reviewed)

c. Monographs and Edited Collections

2005        (second editor with Pedro P. A. Funari and Solange Nunes de Oliveira Schiavetto). Identidades, Discurso e Poder: Estudos da arqueologia contemporânea. Fapesp, São Paulo, Brazil.

2001        (editor). Current Perspectives on Anthropology in Historical Archaeology. American Anthropologist 103:621-704. (peer reviewed)

1996        (editor). Current Perspectives on Historical Archaeology. World Archaeological Bulletin 7. World Archaeological Congress, Southampton, England.

1990        (editor). Historical Archaeology on Southern Plantations and Farms. Historical Archaeology 24(4):1-126. (peer reviewed)

1987        (senior author with Annette M. Nekola and James L. Roark). Exploring the Rustic Life: Multidisciplinary Research at Millwood Plantation, A Large Piedmont Plantation in Abbeville County, South Carolina, and Elbert County, Georgia. 3 vols. National Park Service, Atlanta.

1981        (editor). A Guide for Historical Archaeology in Illinois. Mid-American Research Center, Loyola University of Chicago, Chicago.

1977        The 1975 Season of Archaeological Investigations at Fort de Chartres, Randolph County, Illinois. Southern Illinois Studies 16. Southern Illinois University Museum, Carbondale.

1977        (senior author with Theodore J. Karamanski). Preliminary Archaeological Research at Fort Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Illinois. Southern Illinois Studies 17. Southern Illinois University Museum, Carbondale.

d. Journal Articles and Book Chapters

In press  Colonialism, Articulation, and Modes of Production: An Example from an Early-Modern English Colony. In Modes of Production and Archaeology, edited by Robert M. Rosenswig and Jerimy J. Cunningham. University Press of Florida, Gainesville.

In press   Modern-World Historical Archaeology. To appear in The Oxford Companion to Historical Archaeology, edited by James Symonds, Susan Lawrence, and Laurie Wilkie. Oxford University Press, Oxford. (peer reviewed)

In press  Globalization and the Early Modern Atlantic World, c. 1500-1700. In Handbook for Globalizaiton and Archaeology, edited by T. Hodos and A. Geurds. Routledge, London.`

In press  Inferior Incorporation and Immigrant Racialization: An Archaeological Example from Irish America. To appear in Material Hybridity, edited by Timothy Clack and Marcus Brittain. Oxford University Press, Oxford. (peer reviewed)

In press  The Sociometrics of Nineteenth-Century Ceramics in Rural Ireland: Initial Thoughts about Cut-Sponge-Decorated Vessels. To appear in Ten Years On: Papers of the Tenth Irish Post-Medieval Archaeology Group, edited by Audrey Horning. Four Courts Press, Dublin. (peer reviewed)

In press  Introduction: Singularization of History and Archaeological Framing. To appear in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology 20 (March 2016)

2015        The Tyranny of Silence and Invisibility. In Race in the Northeast, Christopher N. Matthews and Alison McGovern, eds. pp. 313-324.University Press of Florida, Gainsville.

2014 Ceramics as Dating Tools in Historical Archaeology (pp. 1291-1292); History and Archaeology: Relationship Over Time (pp. 3416-3423); Interculturality (pp. 3924-3927); International Journal of Historical Archaeology (pp. 3989-3990); Modern World: Historical Archaeology (pp. 5002-5005); Race in Archaeology (pp. 6223-6226); European Contact and Global Expansion (Post-CE 1500): Historical Archaeology (pp. 2613-2619). In Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology, edited by Claire Smith, Springer, New York. (peer reviewed)

2014        Estratégias para uma arquelogia de auto-liberação. Tessituras 2(1):290-306. (Pelotas, Brazil)

2013       Historical Archaeology. Oxford Bibliographies in Anthropology, edited by John Jackson, Oxford University Press, New York. (peer reviewed)

2013      The Politics of Periodization. In Reclaiming Archaeology: Beyond the Tropes of Modernity, edited by Alfredo Gonzalez-Ruibal, pp. 145-154. Routledge, London. (peer reviewed)

2013        The Daily Lives of Immigrants. In Immigrants in American History: Arrival, Adaptation, and Integration, edited by Elliott R. Barkan, vol. 4, pp. 1825-1837. ABC-CLIO, Santa Barbara, CA. (peer reviewed)

2012 Historical Archaeology. In The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, 2nd ed. edited by Neil Asher Silberman. Volume 1, pp. 667-673. Oxford University Press, New York. (peer reviewed)

2012        Why the Gilded Age . . . and Why Now? International Journal of Historical Archaeology 16:623-633. (peer reviewed)

2012        An Archaeology of Eurocentrism. American Antiquity 77:737-755. (peer reviewed)

2012        Ballykilcline. In Atlas of the Great Irish Famine, edited by John Crowley, William J. Smyth, and Mike Murphy, pp. 318-323. Cork University Press, Cork. (peer reviewed)

2012        An Archaeological Perspective on the Irish Rural Interior. In Rural Ireland: The Inside Story, edited by Vera Kreilkamp, pp. 61-66. McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA.

2011        The Archaeology of Poverty and the Poverty of Archaeology. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 15:533-543.

2011        Life Beneath the Surface: The Dialectics of Race and Poverty During America's First Gilded Age. Historical Archaeology 45(3):151-165. (peer reviewed)

2010        "Forget Me Not": Archaeology Sites Expose Hidden History of the Famine. Irish America 25(4):114.

2010 Encounters with Postcolonialism in Irish Archaeology. Handbook of Postcolonial Archaeology, edited by Jane Lydon and Uzma Rizvi, pp. 199-214. Left Coast Press, Walnut Creek, CA. (peer reviewed)

2010        Twenty-First-Century Historical Archaeology. Journal of Archaeological Research 18:111-150. (peer reviewed)

2010       Three 19th-Century House Sites in Rural Ireland. Post-Medieval Archaeology 44:81-104. (peer reviewed)

2009        A Personal Statement about Twenty-First Century Modern-World Archaeology. In Desafios da Arqueologia: Depoimentos, edited by Lourdes Dominguez, Pedro Paulo A. Funari, Aline Vieira de Carvalho, and Gabriella Barbosa Rodrigues, pp. 233-239. Habilis Editora, Erechim, Brazil.

2009 World-Systems Theory, Networks, and Modern-World Archaeology. In International Handbook of Historical Archaeology, edited by Teresita Majewski and David Gaimster, pp. 253-268. Springer, New York. (peer reviewed)

2009       The Dialectics of Scale in the Historical Archaeology of the Modern World. In Sharing Tracks or Crossing Paths: The Future of Historical Archaeology in Great Britain and Ireland, edited by Audrey Horning and Marilyn Palmer, pp. 7-18. Boydell and Brewer, Woodbridge, UK.

2008        Historical Archaeology as Modern-World Archaeology in Argentina. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 12:181-194.

2008        The Global and the Local in Modern-World Archaeology. In Constructing Post Medieval Archaeology in Italy: A New Agenda, edited by S. Gelichi and M. Librenti, pp. 25-33. Edizioni all'Insegna de Giglio, Florence, Italy.

2008        The Archaeology of African American Slave Religion in the Antebellum South. (Reprint). In Southern Crossroads, edited by Walter Conser and Rodger Payne, pp. 39-62. University of Kentucky Press, Lexington.

2008 Comment on "From an Archaeology of Iconoclasm to an Anthropology of the Body: Images, Punishment and Personhood in England, 1500-1600" by C. Pamela Graves. Current Anthropology 49:50-51.

2008 Historical Archaeology, Methods of. Encyclopedia of Archaeology, edited by Deborah M. Pearsall, pp. 1445-1447. Elsevier, Oxford, England. (peer reviewed)

2008 (senior author with Colm Donnelly) Historical Archaeology in Ireland. Encyclopedia of Archaeology, edited by Deborah M. Pearsall, pp. 1327-1332. Elsevier, Oxford, England. (peer reviewed)

2007        La promisa de una arqueología del munto moderno en América del Sur, con especial referencia a Argentina. Revista de Arqueología Histórica Argentina y Latinoamericana 1:11-27.

2007 Estate Landscapes and the Cult of the Ruin: A Lesson of Spatial Transformation in Rural Ireland. In Estate Landscapes: Design, Improvement and Power in the Post-Medieval Landscape, edited by Jonathan Finch and Kate Giles, pp. 77- 93. Boydell and Brewer, Suffolk, England. (peer reviewed)

2007        Foreword. Se Presume Culpable: Una Arqueología de Gauchos, Fortines y Technologías de Poder en las Pampas Argentinas del Siglo XIX by Facundo Gómez Romero. De Los Cuatrovientos Editorial, Buenos Aires.

2007        Transnational Diaspora and Rights of Heritage. Cultural Heritage and Human Rights, edited by Helaine Silverman and D. Fairchild Ruggles, pp. 92-105. Springer, New York. (peer reviewed)

2006        Discovering Our Recent Pasts: Historical Archaeology and Early Nineteenth-Century Rural Ireland, in Unearthing Hidden Ireland: Historical Archaeology at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, edited by C. E. Orser, Jr., pp. 1- 17, Wordwell, Bray.

2006        (junior author with David Ryder). From Farmers to Defendants: Ballykilcline and Its Historical Context, in Unearthing Hidden Ireland: Historical Archaeology at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, edited by C. E. Orser, Jr., pp. 18-36, Wordwell, Bray.

2006        The People's Pottery: Irish Coarse Earthenware and Their Cultural Significance, in in Unearthing Hidden Ireland: Historical Archaeology at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, edited by C. E. Orser, Jr., pp. 72-96, Wordwell, Bray.

2006        Enter the Levellers: The Archaeology of the Ballykilcline Eviction, in Unearthing Hidden Ireland: Historical Archaeology at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, edited by C. E. Orser, Jr., pp. 176-192, Wordwell, Bray.

2006        Seeking Hidden Ireland: History, Meaning, and Material Culture, in Unearthing Hidden Ireland: Historical Archaeology at Ballykilcline, County Roscommon, edited by C. E. Orser, Jr., pp. 217-228, Wordwell, Bray.

2006        (junior author with Stephen A. Brighton). English Goods in the American Market: The Materialization of a Modern Irish Heritage. In Images, Representations, and Heritage: Moving Beyond Modern Approaches to Archaeology, edited by Ian Russell, pp. 61-88. Springer, New York. (peer reviewed)

2006        On Finding Focus: Comments on "Archaeology, Conflict, and Contemporary Identity in the North of Ireland" by Audrey Horning. Archaeological Dialogues 13(2):202-205.

2006         Symbolic Violence and Landscape Pedagogy: An Illustration from the Irish Countryside. Historical Archaeology 40(2):28-44. (peer reviewed)

2005        Symbolic Violence, Resistance, and the Vectors of Improvement in Early Nineteenth-Century Ireland. World Archaeology 37:392-407. (peer reviewed)

2005        (senior author with Pedro Funari). Arqueologia de Resisténcia Escrava. Cadernos do Lepaaro 1:11-25. Instituto de Ciências Humanas, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Brazil.

2005        An Archaeology of a Famine-Era Eviction. New Hibernia Review 9:45-58. (peer reviewed)

2005        The Material Implications of Colonialism in Early Nineteenth-Century Ireland. In Was Ireland a Colony?: Economics, Politics, and Culture in Nineteenth-Century Ireland, edited by Terrence McDonough, pp. 66-83. Irish Academic Press, Dublin.

2005 Network Theory and the Archaeology of Modern History. In Global Archaeological  Theory: Contextual Voices axnx Contemporary Thoughts, edited by Pedro P. A. Funari, Andrés Zarankin, and Emily Stovel, pp. 77-98. Springer, New York.

2004        (senior author with Thomas C. Patterson). V. Gordon Chile and the Foundations of Social Archaeology. In Foundations of Social Archaeology: Writings of V. Gordon Childe, edited by Thomas C. Patterson and Charles E. Orser, Jr., pp. 1-23. Altamira, Walnut Creek, California. (peer reviewed)

2004 Archaeological Interpretation and the Irish Diasporic Community. In Places in Mind: Public Archaeology as Applied Anthropology, edited by Paul A. Shackel and Erve Chambers, pp. 171-191. Routledge, London. (peer reviewed)

2004        The Archaeologies of Recent History: Post-Medieval, Historical, and Modern-World. In The Blackwell Companion to Archaeology, edited by John Bintliff, pp. 272-290. Basil Blackwell, Oxford. (peer reviewed)

2003 The Beads of Ballykilcline. In Lost and Found: Discovering Ireland's Past, edited by  Joseph P. Fenwick, pp.  309-315. Wordwell, Bray, Ireland.

2003        Archaeology of the Irish Diaspora. In The Encyclopedia of Ireland, edited by Brian Lalor, p. 296. Yale University Press, New Haven.

2003        Descendant Communities: Linking People in the Present to the Past (junior author with Theresa A. Singleton). In Ethical Issues in Archaeology, edited by Larry J. Zimmerman, Karen D. Vitelli, and Julie Hollowell-Zimmer, pp. 143-152. AtlaMira, Walnut Creek, California. (peer reviewed)

2002        111 entries in the Encyclopedia of Historical Archaeology. Routledge, London. (peer reviewed)

2001 The Anthropology in American Historical Archaeology. American Anthropologist 103:621-632. (peer reviewed)

2001        Race and the Archaeology of Identity in the Modern World. In Race and the Archaeology of Identity, edited by C. E. Orser Jr., pp. 1-23. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City. (peer reviewed)

2001       Vessels of Honor and Dishonor: The Symbolic Character of Irish Earthenware. New Hibernia Review 5:83-100. (peer reviewed)

2001       (senior author with Pedro Paulo A. Funari). Archaeology of Slave Resistance and Rebellion. World Archaeology 33:61-72. (peer reviewed)

2001 The 15,000-Year Mistake: When the Facts Don't Fit, Blame the Sun. Scientific American Discovering Archaeology 3(1):24-25.

2000       In Praise of Early Nineteenth-Century Coarse Earthenware. Archaeology Ireland 14(4):8-11.

2000       Comment on "A Critical Archaeology Revisited" by Laurie A. Wilkie and Kevin M. Bartoy. Current Anthropology 41:768-769.

2000      The Father of Atlantis: Ignatius Donnelly Created the Modern Myth and Molded Pseudo-Archaeology. Scientific American Discovering Archaeology 2(5):24-25.

2000      Why Is There No Archaeology in Irish Studies? Irish Studies Review 8:157-165. (peer reviewed)

1999      A teoria de rede e a Arqueologia da História moderna. (Network Theory and the Archaeology of Modern History). In Revista do Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia, edited by M. I. D'Agostino Fleming, pp. 87-101. Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.

1999      Global Historical Archaeology. Techne 5:219-226. (Published in Portugal).

1999        Negotiating Our 'Familiar' Pasts. In The Familiar Past? Archaeologies of Later Historical Britain, edited by Susie West and Sarah Tarlow, pp. 273-285. Routledge, London. (peer reviewed)

1999       Archaeology and the Challenges of Capitalist Farm Tenancy in America. In Historical Archaeologies of Capitalism, edited by Mark P. Leone and Parker B. Potter, Jr., pp. 143-167.  Kluwer Academic/Plenum, New York. (peer reviewed)

1998       Archaeology of the African Diaspora. Annual Review of Anthropology 27:63-82. (peer reviewed)

1998       The Challenge of Race to American Historical Archaeology. American Anthropologist 100:661-668. (peer reviewed)

1998       Epilogue: From Georgian Order to Social Relations at Annapolis and Beyond. In Annapolis Pasts: Historical Archaeology in Annapolis, Maryland, edited by Paul A. Shackel, Paul R. Mullins, and Mark S. Warner, pp. 307-324. University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville. (peer reviewed)

1997       Expanding Historical Archaeology. In Method and Theory in Historical Archaeology: Papers of the Medieval Europe Brugge 1997 Conference, vol. 10, edited by Guy De Boe and Frans Verhaeghe, pp. 9-13. ZeUik, Belgium.

1997       Professionalism in Historical Archaeology. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 1:243-255.

1997       Letter from Ireland: Probing County Roscommon. Archaeology 50(5):72-75.

1997       Archaeology and Nineteenth-Century Rural Life in County Roscommon. Archaeology Ireland 11(1):14-17.

1997       Archaeology and Modern Irish History. Irish Studies Review 18:2-7. (peer reviewed)

1997       Of Dishes and Drains: An Archaeological Perspective on Irish Rural Life in the Great Famine Era. New Hibernia Review 1:120-135. (peer reviewed)

1996       Historical Archaeology for the World. World Archaeological Bulletin 7:2-4.

1996       Historical Archaeology. In The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, edited by Brian M. Fagan, pp. 279-280. Oxford University Press, New York. (peer reviewed)

1996       Beneath the Material Surface of Things: Commodities, Artifacts, and Slave Plantations. Reprinted in Contemporary Archaeology in Theory, edited by Robert Preucel and Ian Hodder, pp. 189-201. Basil Blackwell, Oxford.

1996       Artifacts, Networks, and Plantations: Toward a Further Understanding of the Social Aspects of Material Culture. In Historical Archaeology and the Study of American Culture, edited by Lu Ann De Cunzo and Bernard L. Herman, pp. 233-256. The Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum, Winterthur, Delaware. (peer reviewed)

1996       How the Difference Came to Be. Journal of the West 35(2):3-6.

1996       Can There Be an Archaeology of the Great Famine? In "Fearful Realities": New Perspectives on the Famine, edited by Chris Morash and Richard Hayes, pp. 77-89. Irish Academic Press, Dublin. (peer reviewed)

1995       Midwestern Utopias. In Invisible America: Unearthing our Hidden History, edited by Mark P. Leone and Neil Asher Silberman, pp. 156-157. Henry Holt, New York. (peer reviewed)

1995       The South: The Postbellum Plantation. In Invisible America: Unearthing our Hidden History, edited by Mark P. Leone and Neil Asher Silberman, pp. 190-191. Henry Holt, New York. (peer reviewed)

1995       Is There a Behavioral Historical Archaeology? In Expanding Archaeology, edited by James M. Skibo, William H. Walker, and Axel E. Nielsen, pp. 187-197. University of Utah Press, Salt Lake City, Utah. (peer reviewed)

1994       In Zumbi's Footsteps. The Explorers Journal 72:96-99.

1994       Toward a Global Historical Archaeology: An Example from Brazil. Historical Archaeology 28(1):1-18. (peer reviewed)

1994       Corn Belt Agriculture During the Civil War Period, 1850-1870: A Research Prospectus for Historical Archaeology. In Look to the Earth: Historical Archaeology and the American Civil War, edited by Clarence R. Geier, Jr. and Susan E. Winter, pp. 173-190. University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville. (peer reviewed)

1994       The Archaeology of African-American Slave Religion in the Antebellum South. Cambridge Archaeological Journal 4:33-45. (peer reviewed)

1994       Consumption, Consumerism, and Things from the Earth. Historical Methods: A Journal of Quantitative and Interdisciplinary History 27:61-70. (peer reviewed)

1994       Searching for Palmares at the Serra da Barriga, Brazil. National Geographic Research and Exploration 10:480-482.

1993       Arqueologia histórica para os anos 90. Arqueologica Industrial (published in Portugal) 1:151-152.

1992       A Bibliography of Slave and Plantation Archaeology (as of December 31, 1991). Slavery and Abolition 13:316-337. (peer reviewed)

1992       The Illinois and Michigan Canal: Historical Archaeology and the Irish Experience in America. Éire-Ireland: A Journal of Irish Studies 27:122-134. (peer reviewed)

1992       (senior author with Pedro Paulo A. Funari). Pesquisa arqueológica initial em Palmares. Estudos Ibero-Americanos 18:53-69.

1992       Beneath the Material Surface of Things: Commodities, Artifacts, and slave Plantations. In "Meaning and Uses of Material Culture: Studies in Historical Archaeology," edited by Barbara J. Little and Paul A. Shackel. Historical Archaeology 26(3):95-104. (peer reviewed)

1991       The Continued Pattern of Dominance: Landlord and Tenant on the Postbellum Cotton Plantation. In The Archaeology of Inequality, edited by Robert Paynter and Randall H. McGuire, pp. 40-54. Basil Blackwell, Oxford, England. (peer reviewed)

1991       On Plantations and Patterns. Reprinted in Approaches to Material Culture Research for Historical Archaeologists, compiled by George L. Miller, Olive R. Jones, Lester A. Ross, and Teresita Majewski, pp. 371-383. Society for Historical Archaeology, Tucson.

1991       The Archaeological Search for Ethnicity in the Historic United States. Archeologia Polona (published in Poland) 29:109-121.

1991       Historical Archaeology and the Capitalist Transformation of the Illinois countryside. In Landscape, Architecture, and Artifacts: Historical Archaeology of Nineteenth-Century Illinois, edited by Erich K. Schroeder, pp. 14-21. Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, Springfield. (peer reviewed)

1990       Archaeological Approaches to New World Plantation Slavery. In Archaeological Method and Theory, vol. 2, edited by Michael B. Schiffer, pp. 111-154. University of Arizona Press, Tucson. (peer reviewed)

1990       Stretching Envelopes, Holding Up Elephants, and Asking questions that Don't Count: Comments about a Session in Critical Archaeology. In Underwater Archaeology Proceedings from the Society for Historical Archaeology Conference, edited by Toni Carrell pp. 43-45. Society for Historical Archaeology, Tucson.

1990       (senior author with David W. Babson), Tabasco Brand Pepper Sauce Bottles from Avery Island, Louisiana. Historical Archaeology 24(3):107-114. (peer reviewed)

1990       Historical Archaeology on Southern Plantations and Farms: Introduction. In "Historical Archaeology on Southern Plantations and Farms," edited by Charles E. Orser, Jr., Historical Archaeology 24(4):1-6. (peer reviewed)

1989       On Plantations and Patterns. Historical Archaeology 23(2):28-40. (peer reviewed)

1988       The Archaeological Analysis of Plantation Society: Replacing Status and Caste with Economics and Power. American Antiquity 53:735-751. (peer reviewed)

1988       Toward a Theory of Power for Historical Archaeology: Plantations and Property. In The Recovery of Meaning: Historical Archaeology in the Eastern United States, edited by Mark P. Leone and Parker B. Potter, Jr., pp. 313-343. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington. (peer reviewed)

1987       Plantation Status and Consumer Choice: A Materialist Framework for Historical Archaeology. In Consumer Choice in Historical Archaeology, edited by Suzanne Spencer-Wood, pp. 121-137. Plenum Press, New York. (peer reviewed)

1987       Real or Imagined Confusion in Ethnohistorical Research? A Rejoinder to Thurman. North American Archaeologist 8:319-328.

1987       (second author with Douglas W. Owsley, Robert W. Mann, Peer Moore-Jansen, and Robert L. Montgomery). Demography and Pathology of an Urban Slave Population from New Orleans. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 74:185-197. (peer reviewed)

1986       What Good is Plantation Archaeology? Southern Studies: An Inter-disciplinary Journal of the South 24:444-455. (peer reviewed)

1986       The Archaeological Recognition of the Squad System on Postbellum Cotton Plantations. Southeastern Archaeology 5:11-20. (peer reviewed)

1986       (senior author with Douglas W. Owsley and J. Richard Shenkel). Gaining Access to New Orleans' First Cemetery. Journal of Field Archaeology 13:342-345. (peer reviewed)

1985       (senior author with Annette M. Nekola). Plantation Settlement from Slavery to Tenancy: An Example from a Piedmont Plantation in South Carolina. In The Archaeology of Slavery and Plantation Life, edited by Theresa A. Singleton, pp. 67-94. Academic Press, Orlando. (peer reviewed)

1985       The Sorghum Processing Industry of a Nineteenth-Century Cotton Plantation in South Carolina. Historical Archaeology 19:51-64. (peer reviewed)

1985       Artifacts, Documents, and Memories of the Black Tenant Farmer. Archaeology 39(4):48-53.

1985 A Young People's Guide to Historical Archaeology. Division of Archaeology, State of Louisiana, Baton Rouge.

1984       Trade Good Flow in Arikara Villages: Expanding Ray's "Middleman Hypothesis." Plains Anthropologist 29:1-12. (peer reviewed)

1984       (senior author with Larry J. Zimmerman). A Computer Simulation of Euro-American Trade Good Flow to the Arikara. Plains Anthropologist 29:199-210. (peer reviewed)

1984       The Past Ten Years of Plantation Archaeology in the Southeastern United States. Southeastern Archaeology 3:1-12. (peer reviewed)

1984       (senior author with Claudia C. Holland). Let Us Praise Famous Men, Accurately: Toward a More Complete Understanding of Postbellum Southern Agricultural Practices. Southeastern Archaeology 3:111-120. (peer reviewed)

1984       Understanding Arikara Trading Behavior: A Cultural Case Study of the Ashley-Leavenworth Events of 1823. In Rendevous: Selected Papers of the Fourth North American fur Trade Conference, edited by Thomas C. Buckley, pp. 101-107. The North American Fur Trade Conference, St. Paul, Minnesota.

1983       The Explorer as Ethnographer: James Mackay's "Indian Tribes" Manuscript With a Test of His Comments on the Native Mortuary Customs of the Trans-Mississippi West. Ethnohistory 30:15-33. (peer reviewed)

1982       (senior author with Douglas W. Owsley). Using Arikara Osteological Data to Evaluate an Assumption of Fur Trade Archaeology. Plains Anthropologist 27:195-204. (peer reviewed)

1981       Uniting Public History and Historical Archaeology. The Public Historian 3:75-83. (peer reviewed)

1981       Clues from the Recent Past: the Emergence and Development of American Historical Archaeology. In A Guide for Historical Archaeology in Illinois, edited by Charles E. Orser, Jr., pp. 1-23. Mid-American Research Center, Loyola University of Chicago, Chicago.

1980       Toward a Partial Understanding of Complexity in Arikara Mortuary Practice. Plains Anthropologist 25:113-120. (peer reviewed)

1980       Relating James Mackay's "Indian Tribes" Manuscript to Archaeological Manifestations of Arikara Mortuary Practice. South Dakota Archaeology 4:45-54.

1980       Historical Archaeology in Michigan. Great Lakes Informant 8. Michigan History Division, Michigan Department of State, Lansing.

1979       (junior author with Jerome S. Handler and Frederick W. Lange). Carnelian Beads in Necklaces from a Slave Cemetery in Barbados, West Indies. Ornament 4(2):15-18. (peer reviewed)

1979       Ethnohistory, Analogy, and Historical Archaeology. The Conference on Historic Site Archaeology Papers 13:1-24.

1978       Uncovering the Secrets Buried at the Old State Bank at Shawneetown. Illinois 17(3):37-41.

1978       (senior author with Michael J. McNerney). Assessing Late Historic Sites. Missouri Archaeological Society Newsletter 325:1-3.

e. Review Articles

2003      The Archaeology of High Culture and Its Discontents. Reviews in Anthropology 32:125-139.

2000      Taking the Pulse of Emerging Modernity. International Journal of Historical Archaeology 4:275-280.

1998      Everyday Ritual, Past and Present. Cambridge Archaeological Journal 8:134-135.

1994      Writing World History with Archaeology: From Sumer to Cape Town. Reviews in Anthropology 23:121-130.

f. Book Reviews

2015 Review of British Pirates and Society, 1680-1730 by Margarette Lincoln. Itinerario 39:185-187.

2014      Review of Slavery Before Race: Europeans, Africans, and Indians at Long Island's Sylvester Manor Plantation, 1651-1884 by Katherine Howlett Hayes. American Anthropologist.

2013    Review of The Archaeology of Death and Burial in Post-Medieval Britain and Ireland, by Annia Cherryson, Zoë Crossland, and Sarah Tarlow. Antiquity.

2013    Review of The Materiality of Freedom: Archaeologies of Postemancipation Life, edited by Jodi A. Barnes. Journal of Southern History 79:195-197.

2009   "Archaeology and the Intangible in American History" Review of The Archaeology of Liberty in an American Capital: Excavations in Annapolis by Mark P. Leone. H-Urban, H-Net www.h-net.org/reviews/ showrev. php?id=24685. Originally posted in May.

2009      Review of Port Essington: The Historical Archaeology of a North Australian Nineteenth-Century Military Outpost by Jim Allen. Australian Archaeology 68:72-73.

2008      Review of Archaeology of Atlantic Africa and the African Diaspora, edited by Akinwumi Ogundiran and Toyin Falola. International Journal of African Historical Studies 41:329-330.

2007 Review of The Sangamo Frontier: History and Archaeology in the Shadow of Lincoln by Robert Mazrim. Journal of American History 94:564.

2006      Review of Archaeologies of the British: Explorations of Identity in Great Britain and Its Colonies, 1600-1945 edited by Susan Lawrence. Australasian Historical Archaeology 11:116-117.

2005 Review of The Man Who Found Thoreau: Roland W. Robbins and the Rise of Historical Archaeology in America by Donald W. Linebaugh. Journal of American History 92:1499.

2004 Review of Public Benefits of Archaeology edited by Barbara J. Little. Journal of Field Archaeology 28:464-466.

2003      Review of Arqueologia by Pedro Paulo Funari. Revista do Museu de Arqueologia e Ethnologia (Universidade de São Paulo) 13:307-308.

2002      Review of Politics, Archaeology, and the Creation of a National Museum of Ireland: An

Expression of National Life by Elizabeth Crooke. Irish Studies Review 10:218-220.

2002      Review of Ireland and the Classical World by Philip Freeman. Irish Studies Review 10:83.

2002      Review of Pathways and Ceremonies: The Cursus Monuments of Britain and Ireland, edited by Alistair Barclay and Jan Harding. American Antiquity 67:393-394.

2001 Review of A World of Fine Difference: The Social Architecture of a Modern Irish Village by Adrian Peace. Irish Studies Review 9:418-419.

2000      Review of Landscapes of Neolithic Ireland by Gabriel Cooney. Irish Studies Review 8:369-370.

2000      Review of Montpelier, Jamaica: A Plantation Community in Slavery and Freedom, 1739-1912 by B. W. Higman. Slavery and Abolition 21:170-171.

1999 Review of Talking to the Dead: A Study of Irish Funerary Traditions by Nina Witoszek and Pat Sheeran. Irish Studies Review 7:392-393.

1998      Review of The Irish Ringfort by Matthew Stout. Irish Studies Review 6:69-70.

1998      Review of All Over the Map: Rethinking American Regions by Edward L. Ayers. Patricia Nelson Limerick, Stephen Nissenbaum, and Peter S. Onuf. Journal of the West 37(1):117.

1997      Review of Digging for Dollars: American Archaeology and the New Deal by Paul Fagette. Journal of American History 84:282-283.

1997      Review of A New Deal for Southeastern Archaeology by Edwin A. Lyon. The Public Historian 19:110-113.

1996      Review of Historical Archaeology of the Chesapeake, edited by Paul A. Shackel and Barbara J. Little American Antiquity 61:173-175.

1995      Review of Public Archaeology in Annapolis: A Critical Approach to History in Maryland's Ancient City by Parker B. Potter, Jr. Public Archaeology Review 2(3):14-15.

1995      Review of The Fox Wars: The Mesquakie Challenge to New France by R. David Edmunds and Joseph L. Peyser. Ethnohistory 42:336-337.

1994      Review of Flowerdew Hundred: The Archeology of a Virginia Plantation, 1619-1864 by James Deetz. Journal of American History 81:1285-1286.

1994      Review of African-American Gardens and Yards in the Rural South by Richard Westmacott. Journal of American History 80:1552.

1993      Review of Agrarian Life, Romantic Death: Archaeological and Historical Testing and Data Recovery for the I-85 Northern Alternative, Spartanburg, South Carolina by J. W. Joseph, et al. The Public Historian 15:119-121.

1993      Review of Uncommon Ground: Archaeology and Early African America, 1650-1800 by Leland Ferguson. American Anthropologist 95:483-484.

1993      Review of Papers on Little Bighorn Battlefield Archaeology: The Equipment Dump, Marker 7, and the Reno Crossing, edited by Douglas D. Scott. Plains Anthropologist 38:305-306.

1991      Review of The Politics of the Past, edited by P. Gathercole and D. Lowenthal. Plains Anthropologist 36:181-184.

1991      Review of Excavation of the Donner-Reed Wagons: Historic Archaeology Along the Hastings Cutoff by Bruce R. Hawkins and David B. Madsen. North American Archaeologist 12:277-279.

1991      Review of Pioneer Settlers, Tenant Farmers, and Communities: Objectives, Historical Background, and Excavations, edited by Randall W. Moir and David H. Jurney; and Historic Buildings, Material Culture, and People of the Prairie Margin, edited by David H. Jurney and Randall W. Moir. Historical Archaeology 25(2):119-121.

1991      Review of The Old Village and the Great House: An Archaeological and Historical Examination of Drax Hall Plantation, St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica by Douglas V. Armstrong. Historical Archaeology 25(3):123-124.

1991      Review of The River L'Abbe Mission: A French Colonial Church for the Cahokia Illini on Monks Mound by John A. Walthall and Elizabeth D. Benchley. Illinois Archaeology 3(1):103-104.

1990      Review of Imagining the Past: East Hampton Histories by T. H. Breen. Journal of American History 77:631-632.

1990      Review of Archaeological Perspectives on the Battle of the Little Bighorn by Douglas D. Scott, et al. Plains Anthropologist 35:390-392.

1990      Review of Adobe Walls: The History and Archaeology of the 1874 Trading Post by T. Lindsay Baker and Billy R. Harrison. North American Archaeologist 11:80-84.

1989      Review of Archaeology of Aboriginal Culture Change in the Interior Southeast: Depopulation During the Early Historic Period by Marvin T. Smith. American Antiquity 54:439-440.

1988      Review of Mapping the North American Plains: Essays in the History of Cartography, edited by Frederick C. Luebke, Frances W. Kaye, and Gary E. Moulton. South Dakota History 17:300-301.

1988      Review of Historical Archaeology of Plantations at Kings Bay, Camden County, Georgia, edited by William H. Adams. American Anthropologist 90:1034-1035.

1987      Review of The Archaeology of Shirley Plantation, edited by Theodore R. Reinhart. Historical Archaeology 21:117-118.

1987      Review of Indians, Colonists, and Slaves: Essays in Memory of Charles H. Fairbanks, edited by Kenneth W. Johnson, Jonathan M. Leader, and Robert C. Wilson. Southeastern Archaeology 6:70-71.

1986      Review of Early Fur Trade on the Northern Plains: Canadian Traders Among the Mandan and Hidatsa Indians, 1738-1818 by W. Raymond Wood and Thomas D. Thiessen. Plains Anthropologist 31:339-341.

1986      Review of Grassland, Forest, and Historical Settlement by Michael J. O'Brien; Euro-American Pioneer Settlement Systems in the Central Salt River Valley of Northeast Missouri by Roger D. Mason; and An Analysis of the Historical Ceramics from the Central Salt River Valley of Northeast Missouri by Teresita Majewski and Michael J. O'Brien. Plains Anthropologist 31:259-261.

1985      Review of Cannon's Point Plantation, 1794-1860: Living Conditions and Status Patterns in the Old South by John Solomon Otto. American Ethnologist 12:386-387.

1985      Review of Exploring Buried Buxton: Archaeology of an Abandoned Iowa Coal Mining Town with a Large Black Population by David M. Gradwohl and Nancy M. Osborn. Plains Anthropologist 30:359-361.

1984      Review of Indian Social Dynamics in the Period of European Contact: Fletcher Site Cemetery, Bay County, Michigan by Robert C. Mainfort, Jr. Historical Archaeology 18:118-120.

1984      Review of Atlas of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, The Lewis and Clark Expedition, Volume 1, edited by Gary E. Moulton. Plains Anthropologist 29:344-345.

1982      Review of Excavations at Fort Michilimackinac: 1978-1979, The Rue de la Babillarde by Donald P. Heldman and Roger T. Grange. Michigan History 66(2):47.

1982      Review of Fort Manual: The Archaeology of an Upper Missouri Trading Post of 1812-1813 by C. Hubert Smith and John Ludwickson. South Dakota Archaeology 6:125-126.

1981      Review of The Village Indians of the Upper Missouri: The Mandans, Hidatsas, and Arikaras by Roy W. Meyer. American Indian Culture and Research Journal 5(3):88-92.

1979      Review of Firearms, Traps, and Tools of the Mountain Men by Carl P. Russell. Historical Archaeology 12:113-114.

g. Film Reviews

1995      Review of Unearthing the Slave Trade, Journal of American History 82:1305-1306.

h. Technical Reports

2006      (junior author with Stephen A. Brighton). Archaeological Investigations at the Barlow's Field Site, County Sligo. Prepared for the Heritage Service, Dublin.

2005 Report on Activities Completed as Part of Heritage Council Grant 14053 (2005): Derryveagh Village Project, County Donegal. Prepared for the Heritage Council, Kilkenny, Ireland.

2005      (senior author with Stephen A. Brighton). The Second Season of Archaeological Investigations at Tanzyfort House: The First Coopershill Mansion, Riverstown, County Sligo. Prepared for the Heritage Service, Dublin.

2004      (senior author with Katherine L. Hull, Stephen A. Brighton, and Kevin Barton). Archaeological Investigations at Tanzyfort House: The First Coopershill Mansion, Riverstown, County Sligo. Prepared for the Heritage Service, Dublin.

2001      (junior author with Katherine L. Hull). A Report of Investigations for the Third Season of Archaeological Research at Ballykilcline Townland, Kilglass Parish, County Roscommon, Ireland. Prepared for Dúchas, The Heritage Service, Dublin.

2000      (senior author with David S. Ryder, and Jessica Levon). A Report of Investigations for the Second Season of Archaeological Research at Ballykilcline Townland, Kilglass Parish, County Roscommon, Ireland. Prepared for Dúchas, The Heritage Service, Dublin.

1999 Investigating the Redware Industry of Early Nineteenth-Century Ireland. Prepared for the Heritage Council, Tipperary, Ireland.

1999 A Report of Investigations for the First Season of Archaeological Research at Ballykilcline Townland, Kilglass Parish, County Roscommon, Ireland. Prepared for Dúchas, The Heritage Service, Dublin.

1998      (senior author with Katherine L. Hull) A Report of Investigations for Archaeological Research at Mulliviltrin, County Roscommon, Ireland: A Tenant Village Destroyed During the Mass Evictions of 1847. Prepared for the Office of Public Works, National Monuments Service, Dublin.

1996 A Preliminary Report on Archaeological Investigations at Gorttoose, A Late Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Village in County Roscommon, Ireland. Prepared for the Office of Public Works, National Monuments Service, Dublin, and the National Committee for Archaeology, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin.

1993 In Search of Zumbi: The 1993 Season. Prepared for the National Geographic Society, Washington, and the Social Science Research Council, New York.

1992 The Illinois and Michigan Canal, Historical Archaeology, and the Irish Experience in America. Prepared for the Irish American Cultural Institute, St. Paul, Minnesota.

1992 In Search of Zumbi: Preliminary Archaeological Research at the Serra da Barriga, State of Alagoas, Brazil. Prepared for the National Geographic Society, Washington, D.C.

1989      (senior author with David W. Babson). The Search for the Birthplace of Tabasco Brand Pepper Sauce: Archaeological Investigations at the Laboratory, Avery Island, Louisiana. Prepared for Avery Island, Inc. and McIlhenny Company, Avery Island, Louisiana.

1989      (junior author with David W. Babson). The Avery Island Salt Mine and Village: An Oral History and Architectural Report on Life and Work in South Louisiana. Prepared for the International Salt Company, Avery Island, Louisiana.

1988      (junior author with David W. Babson). Report on Phase I Archaeological Investigations at the Prairie Culture Center Site, Eunice, Louisiana. Prepared for Hamilton and Associates, Opelousas, Louisiana.

1988      (junior author with David W. Babson). Report on Phase I Archaeological Investigations at the Wetlands Culture Center, Thibodaux, Louisiana. Prepared for Hamilton and Associates, Opelousas, Louisiana.

1987 Historical Archaeology at Marsh House (The Residence Hill Site, 16IB130), Avery Island, Louisiana. Prepared for Avery Island, Inc., Avery Island, Louisiana.

1986      Preface to Public Archaeology at a Late Nineteenth-Century to Late Twentieth-Century Urban Housesite, Shreveport, Louisiana by Claudia C. Holland. Prepared for the Division of Archaeology, State of Louisiana, Baton Rouge.

1985      (junior author with Douglas W. Owsley). An Archaeological and Physical Anthropological Study of the St. Peter Street Cemetery, New Orleans, Louisiana. Prepared for the Division of Archaeology, State of Louisiana, Baton Rouge.

1984 Annotated Bibliography of Archaeological Contract Surveys Conducted in Michigan from 1970 through 1979. Michigan History Division, Lansing.

1984      (junior author with Malcolm Shuman.) An Archaeological and Historical Assessment of William Fort's Sugar Mill, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. Prepared for the River Bend Nuclear Power Plant Commission, St. Francisville, Louisiana.

1984      (senior author with Claudia C. Holland). A Preliminary Archaeological Investigation of Oakley Plantation, Audubon State Commemorative Area, West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana. Prepared for the Division of Archaeology, State of Louisiana, Baton Rouge.

1983 Analysis of Historic-Period Artifacts from Seventeen Sites Along the Northern Border Pipeline in South Dakota. Prepared for the Archaeological Research Center, South Dakota State University, Brookings.

1981      (with contributions by James L. Roark and Annette M. Nekola). Summary Report of Phase I Testing and Evaluation of Millwood Plantation (38AB9), Abbeville County, South Carolina. Prepared for the Interagency Archaeological Services, Atlanta.

1979 Archaeological Investigations at the Brouillet House Site, Vincennes, Indiana. Prepared for the Old Northwest Corporation, Vincennes.

1978      Ethnohistorical Overview of Extreme Southern Illinois. In A Cultural Resource Overview of the Shawnee National Forest, edited by Michael J. McNerney, pp. 33-37. Prepared for the U.S. Forest Service, Milwaukee.

1978      Historical Research Procedure and Opportunities for Historical Archaeology. In An Archaeological Inventory of Giant City State Park, Jackson and Union Counties, edited by David P. Braun, pp. 78-85. Center for Archaeological Investigations Research Paper 7. Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale.

1978 Archaeological Explorations at Shawneetown Bank Historic Site, Southern Illinois. Prepared for the Illinois Department of Conservation, Springfield.

PRESENTATIONS (US)

2014      Steps Toward an Archeology of Self-Liberation. Invited keynote address, Annual Public Anthropology Conference, American University, Washington, DC.

2014      Colonial Conflict and Collapse: Modern-World Archaeology at Small Scale on Providence Island. Invited lecture, Circum-Caribbean Studies Seminar, Vanderbilt University, Nashville.

2014      The Capitalist Mode of Production and the Postcolonial Project. Contributed paper. Annual meeting of Society for American Archaeology, Austin, Texas.

2012      Strategies Toward an Archaeology of Self-Liberation. Invited lecture, Department of Anthropology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville.

2012      An Archaeology of Eurocentrism. Invited public lecture, New York State Museum, Albany.

2009      An Archaeological Look Inside the Irish Cabin. Invited public lecture, Irish Studies Program, Boston College.

2009      The Archaeology of Immigration. Invited public lecture, New York State Museum, Albany.

2009      Students in Research: Lessons from the Rural Ireland Lifeways Project. Invited keynote address, Midwest Historical Archaeology Conference, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana.

2008      Has Marx's Ghost Fled? Post-Columbian Historical Archaeology and the Capitalist Metanarrative. Invited paper, American Anthropoogical Association annual meeting, San Francisco.

2008      The Basket at the Center of the World. Invited lecture, New York State Museum, Albany.

2007      The Archaeology of the Irish Diaspora. Invited public lecture, New York State Museum, Albany.

2007      The Irish Lifeways Project: Archaeology Past, Present, and Future. Invited lecture, Department of Anthropology and the Celtic Studies Center, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.

2006      The Irish "Race" in Ireland and America. Invited lecture, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

2006      Theorizing Race for American Archaeology. Invited lecture, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

2006      Post-Medieval Archaeology in Rural Ireland. Invited lecture, Department of Anthropology, University of Maryland, College Park.

2006      Transnational Diasporas and Heritage: Who Has Rights to What Where? Invited paper, Cultural Heritage and Human Rights: An International Workshop, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

2006      Excavating Rural Ireland: Issues for Anthropological Archaeology, Invited lecture, Department of Anthropology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York.

2005      Earthen Plates, Wooden Dishes, and Egg Shell Cups: Historical Archaeology and the Material World of William Carleton. Contributed paper, American Conference of Irish Studies annual meeting, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame.

2005      Modern-World Archaeology and Globalization: Looking Toward the Future of Knowing the Recent Past. Invited Distinguished Scholar lecture, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.

2005      In Zumbi's Footsteps: Searching for Brazil's Most Famous Runaway Slave Community. Invited Distinguished Scholar lecture, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo.

2004      Race and Archaeology: An Example from Rural Ireland. Invited speaker for the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates archaeological field school, New Philadelphia, Illinois.

2004      Symbolic Violence and Everyday Life in the Irish Countryside. Contributed paper, Society for Historical Archaeology annual meeting, St. Louis, Missouri.

2003      Race and Culture in Early Nineteenth-Century Ireland. Invited lecture, Department of Anthropology, University of Illinois at Chicago.

2001      Unearthing Forgotten Ireland. Invited guest lecture for the symposium, Archaeology in Annapolis, Annapolis, Maryland.

2001      Marx and Historical Archaeology: A Missing Link? Invited contribution to the American Anthropological Association annual meeting, Washington, DC.

2001      Non-Linear Interpretations of Early Nineteenth-Century Ireland. Invited contribution to the Society for American Archaeology annual meeting, New Orleans.

2001      Race, Color, and Identity in Early Nineteenth-Century Ireland. Invited contribution to Upheaval and Change in Ireland's Past, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

2000      Historical Archaeology: Atlantic Dimensions. Invited contribution to the International Seminar on Atlantic History, Harvard University, Cambridge.

2000      Unearthing a World of Goods in Nineteenth-Century Rural Ireland. Distinguished Professor lecture, Normal, Illinois.

1999      Exploring the Nineteenth Century in the Green Fields of Modern Ireland. Invited contribution to American Anthropological Association annual meeting, Chicago.

1999      The Archaeology of Traditional Ireland. Invited lecture, Department of Anthropology, University of Missouri, St. Louis.

1998      The Archaeology of Gorttoose and Mulliviltrin, County Roscommon. Invited guest lecture, The Great Irish Famine Forum, Irish American Unity Foundation, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

1998      History, Archaeology, and the Invisible Irish. Invited guest lecture, Institute on History and Social Science, Illinois State University, Normal.

1998      Archaeology and the Invisible Irish. Invited guest lecture, Irish Studies Program, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Carbondale.

1997      Archaeology and the Tyranny of Documents. Invited guest lecture, "Breaking the Silences: Legacies of the Irish Starvation" Seminar, New York City.

1997      A Future of Historical Archaeology. Invited guest lecture, Department of Anthropology, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York.

1996      Archaeology and the Search for the Invisible Irish. Special guest lecture, Department of Anthropology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.

1996      What Happened to the People's Dishes? An Archaeological Perspective on the Great Famine. Contributed paper to the annual meeting of the American Conference for Irish Studies, Carbondale, Illinois.

1996      The Archaeology of America's Farms. Discussant paper delivered at the annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology, Cincinnati.

1993      (with Pedro Paulo A. Funari). Initial Research at Palmares, The Great 17th-Century African Kingdom in Northeastern Brazil. Contributed paper delivered at the annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology, Kansas City.

1993      Profits in the Fields: Tenancy, Capitalism, and Historical Archaeology. Invited paper for the School of American Research Advanced Seminar "The Historical Archaeology of Capitalism," Santa Fe.

1993      Inventing Palmares: Maroon Households in the Creation of the Americas. Invited lecture at the Center for New World Comparative Studies, John Carter Brown Library, Brown University, Providence.

1992      Notes on Plantations on the Periphery: The Archaeology of Small Slave-Holding Sites. Invited discussant at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Pittsburgh.

1992      Preliminary Archaeological Research at Palmares, Brazil. Invited lecture presented to the Departments of History and Anthropology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville.

1992      In Search of Zumbi: Preliminary Archaeological Research at Palmares, Brazil. Invited paper delivered at the Illinois State Museum, Springfield.

1991      Historical Archaeology and the Social History of Things. Invited paper delivered at the Winterthur Conference, "Historical Archaeology and the Study of American Culture," Winterthur, Delaware.

1990      The Archaeology of Commoners: Comments on the Session "New Light on Old Ground." Invited discussant at the Eleventh Illinois History Symposium, Springfield.

1990      Stretching Envelopes, Holding Up Elephants, and Asking Questions that Don't Count: Comments on a Symposium on Critical Archaeology. Invited discussant at the annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology, Tucson, Arizona.

1989      Critical Archaeology and Historical Materialism. Invited paper delivered in the session "Current Issues in Archaeological Method and Theory" at the First Joint Archaeological Congress, Baltimore.

1989      African-American Historical Archaeology in the South Carolina Piedmont. Invited lecture for the Bloomington-Normal, Illinois, Black History Project, Bloomington, Illinois.

1989      Historical Archaeology and the Capitalist Transformation of the Illinois Countryside. Contributed paper delivered at the Illinois Historical Archaeology Conference, Rock Island, Illinois.

1989      Tabasco Sauce, Sugar, and Slaves: Historical Archaeology at Avery Island, Louisiana. Invited paper delivered at the Illinois State Museum, Springfield.

1988      The Use of Plantation Archaeology in Local History. Invited paper delivered as part of the exhibit "Plantations through the Louisiana Heartland," Natchitoches, Louisiana.

1988      Plantations as Archaeological Units. Invited lecture for the Workshop in Historic Preservation Technology and Plantation Culture, Northwestern State University, Natchitoches, Louisiana.

1988      The Nature and Scope of Plantation Archaeology. Invited lecture, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

1988      Finding a Theory for Plantation Archaeology. Invited graduate seminar lecture, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

1986      The Death of the Southern Plantation: A Legend for Modern Archaeology. Invited paper delivered in the session "The Past is the Present" at the annual meeting of the Society of American Archaeology, New Orleans.

1986      Out of Slavery: The Material Culture of Freedom. Invited paper delivered at "Learning from the Material World of Slaves" at the Tenth Annual Symposium on Language and Culture in South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina.

1986      The Use of Plantation Archaeology. Invited paper delivered in the session "Buried Treasures: Finding the History in Historical Archaeology" at the annual meeting of the Southern Historical Association, Charlotte, North Carolina.

1985      (junior author with Douglas W. Owsley). Demography and Pathologies of Skeletons from New Orleans' First Cemetery. Paper delivered in the symposium "Afro-American Biohistory: The Physical Evidence" at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropology, Knoxville, Tennessee.

1985      Public Archaeology and Research in Baton Rouge and Shreveport. Invited paper delivered in the symposium "The Current State of Archaeological Research in Louisiana" for the Foundation for Historical Louisiana, Baton Rouge.

1983      The Spatial Organization of a Postbellum Plantation. Paper delivered at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Archaeological Conference, Columbia, South Carolina.

1981      The Practical Union of History and Anthropological Archaeology. Invited paper delivered at the Conference on Public History, Raleigh, North Carolina.

1980      "The Next Morning We Commenced Trading": Studying Socioeconomic Change Among the Arikara with Archaeological Data. Paper delivered at the annual meeting of the Plains Anthropological Conference, Iowa City, Iowa.

1980      Phase I Testing and Evaluation at Millwood Plantation, Abbeville County, South Carolina. Invited paper delivered at the Richard B. Russell Workshop, National Park Service, Atlanta, Georgia.

1980      Uniting History and Anthropological Archaeology: Lessons from Millwood Plantation. Invited paper delivered at the History and Archaeology Symposium, University of Missouri, St. Louis.

1978      Early Historic Settlement of the Ouabache. Invited paper delivered at the Ninth Annual Meeting of the Illinois Association for the Advancement of Archaeology, Mount Vernon, Illinois.

PRESENTATIONS (Outside US)

2015      What is Modern-World Archaeology and Why Do We Need It? Steps Toward an Archaeology of Self-Liberation; Colonial Conflict and Collapse. Invited lectures, Gothenburg University, Sweden.

2015      Proposal for the Archaeology of Colonialism on Isla Providencia. Invited lecture, Instituto Colombiano de Antropologia e Historia, Bogotá, Colombia.

2013      What is Modern-World Archaeology, and Why? Invited lecture, Sociedade de Arqueologia Brasileira annual conference, Aracaju, Brazil.

2013      Strategies Toward an Archaeology of Self-Liberation. Invited lecture, Federal Univerisity of Pelotas, University of Campinas, and University of São Paulo, Brazil.

2013      The Singularization of History and Archeological Framing. Invited paper, Nordic TAG, University of Iceland, Reykjavik.

2011      Postgraduate workshop on Historical and Modern-World Archaeologies. School of Social Sciences, University of Queensland, Australia.

2011      What Is Modern-World Archaeology, and Why? Keynote Address, Annual Meeting of the Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology, Dunedin, New Zealand.

2011      An Archaeological Look Inside the Irish Cabin. Irish Studies Program, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

2011      Modern-World Archaeology. Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

2011      An Archaeology of Eurocentrism. Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

2010      The Archaeology of the Great Irish Famine. Invited public lecture, NUI Galway Summer School Program and School of Geography and Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.

2010      The Sociometrics of Sponge-Decorated Ceramics in Rural Ireland. Contributed paper, Irish Post-Medieval Archaeology Group annual meeting, Belfast, Northern Ireland.

2010      The Art and Archaeology of the Nineteenth-Century Farmhouse. Invited public lecture, School of Geography and Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.

2010      Cultural Patrimony and Descendant Communities in a Diasporic World. Invited lecture, Discipline of Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.

2009      The Dialectics of Race and Poverty and Their Relevance for the Archaeology of the Masses. Invited lecture, University of York/York Archaeological Trust, York, UK.

2008      The Dialectics of Scale: The Micro/Macro Conundrum in Contemporary Historical Archaeology. Invited keynote address, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History symposium, University of Leicester, England.

2007      The Archaeology of Post-Medieval Ireland. Invited lecture, Donegal Historical Society, Church Hill, County Donegal, Ireland.

2006      The International Journal of Historical Archaeology and the Cause of Global Historical Archaeology. Invited lecture, Dipartimento di Scienze Dell'Antichità e del Vicino Oriente, Università Ca'Forscari di Venezia, Venice, Italy.

2006      Ireland in Its 21st-Century Context. Invited lecture, Department of Archaeology, University College Cork, Ireland.

2005      An Historical Archaeology of Consumerism: Lessons and Questions from Roscommon and Sligo. Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland.

2005      Eighteenth-Century Landscapes and Archaeology: Some Findings from Coopershill. Sligo Institute of Technology, Sligo, Ireland.

2005      Archaeology and Rural Life in Post-Medieval Ireland. Donegal County Museum, Letterkenny, Ireland.

2002      Race and Identity: Linking the Irish and the African Experiences. Invited lecture, The Ireland Institute, Dublin.

2001      Nineteenth-Century Irish Identity and the Role of Archaeology. Invited guest seminar, National University of Ireland, Galway.

2001      Internal Colonialism and Double Consciousness in Rural Ireland. Contributed paper delivered at the meeting of the Theoretical Archaeology Group, Dublin, Ireland.

2001      Irish Historical Archaeology. Invited lecture for summer course in Irish archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.

2000      The Archaeology of Ballykilcline and What It Means. Public lecture, Strokestown, Ireland.

2000      Continuing the Archaeology of Early Nineteenth-Century Ireland. Invited lecture for summer course in Irish archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.

1999      Recent Archaeological Research at Ballykilcline. Invited roundtable discussion for the Ballykilcline Society, Strokestown, Ireland.

1999      The Archaeology of Early Nineteenth-Century Ireland. Invited lecture for summer course in Irish archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.

1999      Unearthing Hidden Ireland. Invited lecture to the Ireland Institute for Historical and Cultural Studies, Civic Museum, Dublin.

1999      The Material World of Colonialism. Contributed paper to the Third Galway Conference on Colonialism, National University of Ireland, Galway.

1998      Global Historical Archaeology and the Study of Technology New and Old. Invited lecture for the International Conference on Molinology, Amadora, Portugal.

1996      What is Global Historical Archaeology? Invited lecture, Institute of Archaeology, University of Lund, Sweden.

1996      The Archaeology of History's Invisible Men and Women: A Comparative Look at African-American Slaves and Pre-Famine Irish Peasants. Invited lecture, Institute of Archaeology, University of Lund, Sweden.

1996      Self-Reflection in Archaeology: What are an Archaeologist's Responsibilities to the Present? Lessons from Brazil and Ireland. Invited lecture, Institute of Archaeology, University of Lund, Sweden.

1995      Exploring the Invisible: The Great Famine and the Promise of Archaeology. Arts Faculty Seminar, National University of Ireland, Galway.

1995      An Introduction to Archaeological Theory. Graduate program lecture, Department of Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway.

1995      Historical Archaeology and Colonialism. Graduate seminar lecture, Program in Culture and Colonialism, National University of Ireland, Galway.

1995      The Strokestown Archaeological Project. Invited lecture, Department of Archaeology Diploma Class, National University of Ireland, Galway.

1995      The Archaeology of the Great Famine. Invited lecture, Archaeology Society, National University of Ireland, Galway.

1994      Can There Be an Archaeology of the Great Famine? Contributed paper to the conference, "Famine and Nineteenth-Century Ireland," Maynooth College, Maynooth, Ireland.

1992      Broadening Historical Archaeology. Contributed paper delivered at EuroTAG (Theoretical Archaeology Group), Southampton University, Southampton, England.

1991      Plantation Archaeology in the United States. Invited lecture delivered at the State University of Campinas, Campinas, Brazil.

1991      Current Trends in Plantation Archaeology. Invited lecture delivered at Santos Catholic University, Santos, Brazil.

1991      Current Trends in Historical Archaeology. Invited lecture delivered at the Paulista Museum, University of São Paulo, Brazil.

1990      Anthropology and Historical Archaeology. Invited lecture delivered at the Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Tomar, Portugal.

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Historical archaeology and anthropology; post-Columbian archaeology; colonialism; practice, network, and sociospatial theory; globalization and consumerism; slavery, maroonage, and indenture; the Atlantic world-

Professor Alistair Paterson

Professor Alistair Paterson is an archaeologist at the University of Western Australia where he has been Head of the School of Social Sciences (2013-15) and Archaeology Discipline Chair (2010-2012). He is currently a visiting researcher at the Institute of Archaeology, University of Oxford.

His research and teaching covers culture contact, historical archaeology in maritime and terrestrial settings, European colonization, historical rock art, and archaeological and historical methodology.

Much of his work is now located in Western Australia, including regional studies of Australia's Northwest, the uses of coast and offshore islands in colonial and pre-colonial settings (in collaboration with the Western Australian Museum, iVec@UWA), and early colonial settlements across the state.

He is lead CI on Shipwrecks of the Roaring Forties: A Maritime Archaeological Reassessment of some of Australia's Earliest Shipwrecks. He is a CI on the ARC DP The Barrow Island Archaeology Project and on the ARC Linkage project Southeast Asia's Global Economy Climate & the Impact of Natural Hazards from the 10th to 21st Centuries. He is the author of A Millennium of Cultural Contact (Left Coast, 2011), The Lost Legions: Culture Contact in Colonial Australia (Alta Mira, 2008) and editor with Jane Balme of Archaeology in Practice: A Student Guide to Archaeological Analyses (2nd edition, Blackwell Publishing, 2013).

In 2009 he was based in Copenhagen as Honorary Visiting Fellow at the University of Copenhagen and at the National Museum. He is past President of the Australian Archaeological Association (2005-2007), and has been involved with editing for, and publishing in, key archaeology journals including Antiquity, World Archaeology, Historical Archaeology, Archaeology in Oceania, Australasian Historical Archaeology, Internet Archaeology, and Australian Archaeology.

Jacqui Pearce

Jacqui is a Senior Finds Specialist at MOLA and an internationally renowned expert in medieval and later ceramics, glass and clay tobacco pipes.

She has wide ranging experience of medieval and later pottery and has been involved in the establishment and maintenance of the MOLA Fabric Reference Collection, which constitutes the principal fabric type-series for the London area. In addition, she has developed a detailed recording system for clay pipes in line with national guidelines and that was instrumental in the establishment of the Museum of London's Clay Tobacco Pipe Makers' Marks website. Other areas of specialism include a wide range of medieval and later finds. A particularly important part of Jacqui’s outlook is an holistic approach to finds research as a part of total site reporting and the use of material culture to inform our understanding of past lives (archaeological biography).

Jacqui is the author of numerous major papers and books, including four parts of an extensive Type-series of London Medieval Pottery. In the latest of these she covers shelly-sandy wares and greywares. She was Joint Editor of Post-Medieval Archaeology from 2009-2014 and is a committee member of the English Ceramic Circle, and Trustee of the National Clay Tobacco Pipe Archive. She is a frequent public speaker, leads workshops, and teaches evening classes through Birkbeck College, University of London, with whom she is an accredited lecturer. In 2011 she was awarded the Ralph Merrifield Prize for Services to London Archaeology.

Her extensive bibliography can be viewed here: http://www.academia.edu/2085938/Jacqui_Pearce_Bibliography

Email: jpearce@mola.org.uk

Adrian Praetzellis

Adrian Praetzellis is Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Anthropological Studies Center at Sonoma State University in California.

Almost all of Adrian's research is based on commercial archaeological projects. This has been a good thing, for the serendipitous nature of this work has forced him to look for connections. He is interested in urban archaeology, including the lives of urban people (Jews, Chinese, African Americans,) as well as the physical processes by which cities are made. He is the author/illustrator of three books on archaeological theory and method, most recently Archaeological Theory in a Nutshell (2015).

With archaeologist Mary Praetzellis, his wife and collaborator, Adrian creates alternative modes of archaeological interpretation such as narrative and mocudrama with the general goal of getting archaeologists to lighten up.

Jonathan Prangnell

My research interests cover both the scientific and social aspects of historical archaeology to understand the development of the colonialism (particularly in Queensland) over the past 190 years.

Creation and Taphonomy of Burial Sites

The scientific research relates to the archaeological and social transformations that resulted in the creation of the archaeological record of the North Brisbane Burial Grounds (a cemetery housing up to 10,000 colonists) and other cemeteries in southeast Queensland.  To date this research has produced 7 journal articles, 2 completed PhDs, and numerous Honours projects.  I currently have six research projects on-going in this area:

  • Forensic research to identify a burns victim in the Roman Catholic cemetery;
  • Examination of the impact of variable degrees of sediment pressure across the cemetery (this follows closely on the recently published Journal of Archaeological Science paper on the development of a method for calculating soil pressures);
  • The identification of various land fill leachates within the Burial Grounds and their various taphonomic affects;
  • The role of salt in the taphonomic degradation of metals and woods within the Burial Grounds;
  • The investigation of negative textile impressions to broaden the scope of a paper published in 2013 in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology; and
  • The development of a multivariate formula of the taphonomic signature of the Burial Grounds.

The social archaeology of nineteenth and early twentieth century southeast Queensland

This project includes research examining family life at Caboonbah Homestead in the Brisbane Valley, the development of the sugar industry on the Gold Coast, the role of St Lawrence (in central Queensland) as a port town servicing copper mines and cattle stations in the nineteenth century, and the use and meaning of ceramics on Queensland Rail.  These projects tie together to allow an examination of Queensland frontier life (at various strata), Victorianism, colonialism, industrial development, and social relationships.  These projects have so far produced seven conference papers presented internationally, seven nationally, a book, a book chapter, 12 journal articles, one completed PhD, one on-going PhD and four completed Honours theses.

http://socialscience.uq.edu.au/jon-prangnell

Email: Jonathan Prangnell

Dr Peter Rauxloh

Peter is the Director of Technology Solutions at MOLA. He is a leading exponent of databases and GIS in archaeology, and has been focused on the application of IT within archaeology for more than 25 years. His work involves the utilization and development of mobile, desktop, server and web based GIS and data capture platforms. This is directed in support of field work, inter and intra-site spatial analysis, graphical production and dissemination, and occurs in the context of both normal site investigations and bespoke project work. This includes preparing and presenting non-spatial and map-based data from archaeological and museum-collection databases for presentation via the Internet.

Peter’s current research focus is in the application of Small Unmanned Aircraft - for which he holds a commercial pilot’s licence - to the survey of landscapes and monuments. The technique uses a digital photogrammetry approach, and provides a new mechanism for accurate and rapid metric survey. The detailed 2D orthomosaics and immersive 3D models created from aerial and ground based imagery using this technique provide a powerful new tool for the capture, management and appreciation of heritage resources. The innovative application of such system to the interpretation, explanation and characterisation of heritage assets from archaeological features to sites, historic buildings, and landscapes, remain central to his role.

Email: prauxloh@mola.org.uk

Beth Richardson

Beth is a Senior Finds Specialist at MOLA, specialising in Roman pottery and post-Roman finds.

Beth joined the Department of Urban Archaeology (DUA) at the Museum of London as a Roman pottery specialist in 1978 and was one of the specialists responsible for establishing the London Roman Pottery Fabric Reference Collection. She has published a fabric-based typology of London’s Roman pottery, and an important assemblage of early 3rd century imports from the Roman waterfront as well as many site assemblage publications. Since 2002, Beth has increasingly specialised in post-Roman finds, particularly leather, and has recently been working on the publication of large assemblages of late medieval shoes from a site in Southwark and medieval metal and organic finds from the City waterfront. Over the last few years she has also published several reports and articles on finds from London’s 18th and 19th century cemetery sites, researching the folk traditions which lie behind some of the grave goods. She is a speaker at conferences and to specialist groups.

Beth also gained the Museum Association’s professional qualification, the Museums Diploma, and has also worked in museums as a curator of Archaeology and Social History. She is an Associate of the Museums Association (AMA) and also a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (MCIfA)

Email: brichardson@mola.org.uk

Giorgio Riello

My fields of expertise are located within the long chronologies and geographical spaces covered by Global History. My particular interests are directed towards issues of 'material life and economic development' and the relationship between consumption and production. My current research focuses on changes in consumer demand and their impact on the spheres of production and material culture, with specific reference to textiles and clothing. My areas of interest are:

Global History

In 2013 I published a book entitled Cotton: The Fabric that Made the Modern World (Cambridge UP). This book analyses the role played by cotton textiles in the re-shaping of global trade and production during the long period from 1300 to the mechanisation of the industry in the late eighteenth/early nineteenth century. I have edited with Prasannan Parthasarathi (Boston College) a volume entitled The Spinning World: A Global History of Cotton Textiles, 1250-1850 (Oxford UP 2009; Pb 2011) and with Tirthankar Roy (LSE) How India Clothed the World: The World of South Asian Textiles, 1500-1850 (Brill 2009; Pb 2012). Both volumes are the result of the research activities that I undertook at the Global Economic History Network (GEHN) at the London School of Economics.

Luxury and Material Life

I am developing research and teaching in the area connecting economic history and material culture. I am particularly interested in the ways in which traded commodities shape people's understanding of global processes in the early modern period. I have written on domestic textiles in medieval and early modern Europe and Italian food in eighteenth-century Britain. Since 2008 I have been collaborating with Anne Gerritsen on research on the theme of 'Global Material Culture'. Between 2010-13 we jointly directed an AHRC International Network on Global Commodities: the Material Culture of Early Modern Connections with the V&A, Bilgi University Istanbul and the Peabody Essex Musem in Salem. This projects led to the publication of Writing Material Culture History (Bloomsbury 2015) and The Global Lives of Things (Routledge 2016) both co-edited with Anne Gerritsen. Between 2013-15 I coordinated the Leverhulme-funded 'The Luxury Network', a collaboration between the universities of Warwick, Bologna, Stockholm, Melbourne, The V&A and the Museum of Art and Design in New York. With Peter McNeil (UTS), I co-authored Luxury: A Rich History that will be published in early 2016 by Oxford UP.

Nan A Rothschild

EDUCATION:

1966-75           New York University                         Ph.D. (Archaeology)

1959-62           Columbia University                           M.A.  (Cultural Anthropology)

1955-59           Vassar College                                    B.A.  (Anthropology)

RECENT EMPLOYMENT:

2012 -              Director of Admissions, Museum Studies, Columbia

2006 -              Director of Museum Studies, Columbia University

2006 -              Research Professor, Barnard College

2003 -              Research Associate, Maxwell Museum, Univ. of New Mexico

RECENT GRANTS AND AWARDS:

2012                Lifetime Achievement Award, New York State Archaeological Association

2010                            National Geographic, Seneca Village Project ($10,000)

2010                            National Science Foundation, Research Experience for Undergraduates, the Seneca Village Project, Excavation Phase, with Prof Diana Wall, ($117,000)

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Books:

The Archaeology of American Cities (with Diana Wall), University Press of Florida, 2014. Republished in paper 2015.

New York City Neighborhoods: The Eighteenth Century. Academic Press: 1990 (267 pp.).                         (Republished 2008, Percheron Press, Eliot Werner Publications).

Colonial Encounters in a Native American Landscape: The Spanish and Dutch in North America.  Smithsonian Institution Press, 2003.

From Prehistory to the Present: Studies in Northeastern Archaeology in Honor of Bert Salwen.

Nan A. Rothschild and Diana diZ. Wall, eds.  Council for Northeastern Archaeology (special publication), 1994.

Labrador Winter: The Ethnographic Journals of William Duncan Strong, 1927-28, edited by Eleanor B. Leacock and Nan A. Rothschild. Smithsonian Press, 1994.  (225 pp).

Prehistoric Dimensions of Status: Gender and Age in Eastern North America, Garland Publishing, 1991 (216 pp.).

The Research Potential of Anthropological Museum Collections, edited by A.M. Cantwell, J.B. Griffin and N.A. Rothschild.  Annals, New York Academy of Sciences, New York: 1981, no. 376 (584 pp.).

Recent Articles, book chapters, reviews:

Maria and Alida, Two Dutch Women in the English Hudson Valley@ in Tales of Gotham: Historical Archaeology, Ethnohistory and Microhistory in New York City, edited by Meta Janowitz and Diane Dallal,  Springer 2013.

Archaeological Research and the Academic Process (with Vance Halliday), in Archaeology in Society: its Relevance in the Modern World, eds. Marcy Rockman and Joe Flatman, Springer, 2011.

Digging for Food in Early New York City; IN Gastropolis: Food and New York City, Jonathan Deutsch and Anne Hauck-Lawson, eds. Columbia Univ Press (2009). Pp. 50-67.

Review of Lost Legions: Culture Contact in Colonial Australia, Alistair Paterson, In Australian Archaeology, v. 69 (2009)

Colonialism, Past and Present in New Mexico (co-authored) Archaeologies special edition, Charles Cobb and Diana Loren, eds (2008).

Colonized Bodies: Personal and Social, Past Bodies, Dusan Boric and John Robb, eds, Berghahn Press (2008).

MEMBERSHIP IN LEARNED SOCIETIES:

American Anthropological Association (present Executive Board member)

Society for American Archaeology (past Executive Board member)

New York Archaeological Council (past President)

New York State Archaeological Association

Society of Professional Archaeologists

Cultural Resource Management Services (past Vice-President)

Society for Historical Archaeology

Professional Archaeologists of New York City (President twice)

OTHER  RECENT PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES:

2008-11          Executive Board, American Anthropological Association

2005-               Member, Editorial Board, Archaeologies, Journal of the World Archaeological Congress.

1995-               Member, History Advisory Board, New York Historical Society

1993-95, 2002-05        Member, Society for American Archaeology, Distinguished Service Award Committee (1997-98 Chair)

1993                Delegate, Federal Steering Committee on the African Burial Ground"

http://anthropology.columbia.edu/people/profile/387

Email: Nan A Rothschild

Stephen W Silliman

Stephen Silliman is Professor and Graduate Program Director of the M.A. in Historical Archaeology in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He is an archaeologist who specializes in the study of long-term indigenous histories in the context of colonialism. Although these interests span the globe, his primary focus has been on North America, specifically on the West Coast studying Native Americans in the throes of 19th-century Mexican-Californian, Spanish, and Russian colonialism and, much more recently, on the East Coast examining Native Americans in southern New England contending with several centuries of English and Euro-American settler colonialism. He even briefly pursued this research even further eastward to Bermuda.

The focal point of his archaeological research since 2003 has been in southeastern Connecticut where he has led a community-engaged, collaborative archaeological field school project with the Eastern Pequot Tribal Nation on their historic reservation, formally secured by them in 1683 and still occupied to this day. This project involving undergraduate and graduate students thrives not only the archaeological and historical study of colonialism and indigeneity in the past on one of the longest occupied reservations in North America, but also on the political implications of those colonial legacies and heritage issues for descendent communities today. A short university video can be seen here: www.youtube.com/watch?v=khAhb4LhmOk&feature=youtu.be. It has received funding from the National Science Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, and various sources from the University of Massachusetts Boston.

As a result of these interests, Professor Silliman's research and publications have centered on historical archaeology, colonialism, postcolonialism, community-engaged archaeology, collaborative methodologies, time, memory, social identity, practice, labor, gender, and the politics of heritage. He has published recently in Journal of Social Archaeology, American Antiquity, Historical Archaeology, and American Anthropologist, as well as numerous edited volumes. He is also the author of Lost Laborers in Colonial California: Native Americans and the Archaeology of Rancho Petaluma (University of Arizona Press, 2004), co-editor of Historical Archaeology (with Martin Hall, Wiley-Blackwell, 2006), and editor of Collaborating at the Trowel's Edge: Teaching and Learning in Indigenous Archaeology (University of Arizona Press, 2008).

www.faculty.umb.edu/stephen_silliman

Charlotte Smith

Dr Charlotte Smith is a senior curator in the Humanities Department at Museum Victoria. Among her responsibilities is the curation and management of the museum's extensive historical archaeology collection including the largest 19th-century urban assemblage in the world, the Commonwealth Block Assemblage.

In her role, Charlotte works closely with archaeologists, researchers and regulators to improve communication between repositories and depositors. Charlotte has collaborated with colleagues in the archaeology and heritage sector to refine artefact management guidelines, and trial new approaches to on-site recording practices. Charlotte's objective is to develop sustainable approaches to managing archaeological assemblages: this includes the rehabilitation of 'neglected' assemblages and developing less labour intensive methods for cataloguing and receipting assemblages.

Relevant publications include Caring for our Collections (edited with Tim Murray, 2011), and Managing the Commonwealth Block Archaeological Assemblage (with Sarah Hayes, 2010).

Ian W G Smith

Ian W. G. Smith

Associate Professor of Archaeology
Department of Anthropology & Archaeology
University of Otago
PO Box 56 Dunedin, 9054
New Zealand

p: +64 3 479 8752          f: +64 3 479 9095          e: ian.smith@otago.ac.nz
w: www.otago.ac.nz/anthropology/staff/otago112758.html

Qualifications

BA(Hons), PhD (Otago)

Memberships of Professional Organisations

Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology, International Council for Archaeozology, New Zealand Archaeological Association, Royal Society of New Zealand, Society for Historical Archaeology

Resume

Ian Smith has been engaged in archaeological research since 1975, has taught at the University of Auckland and University of Otago, had visiting fellowships at Australian National University and University of Exeter, and has served on the Council of the New Zealand Archaeological Association. He has conducted fieldwork in both prehistoric and historical archaeology throughout New Zealand, the Chatham Islands, Norfolk Island and the Society Islands. His work has involved close engagement and collaboration with several New Zealand Māori communities.

Research Interests

Archaeology of the modern world; New Zealand archaeology; culture contact and change; archaeozoology; human impacts on the environment.

My research is concerned with the ways in which the archaeology of New Zealand helps us to understand the dynamics of the modern world. Among the themes that it has addressed are the cultural adaptions made by first Māori then Pākehā settlers in New Zealand, the dynamics of their interactions, and the impacts that they had on local environments. Interrogation of these questions has international significance because the compressed time scale of human presence in New Zealand enables more precise disentangling of causative variables.

Projects

Archaeology of Early Pākehā New Zealand

A book currently in preparation that examines the archaeology of New Zealand from the first visits by European explorers until 1860, when incoming Pākehā settlers outnumbered Māori. It argues that the cultural entanglements of this period have influenced the ways in which both Māori and Pākehā cultures are perceived today.

Human Impacts on New Zealand Marine Biota

A long-term series of investigations into the ways in New Zealand's marine organisms have been impact by human presence. Beginning with archaeological reconstruction of Māori impacts on fur seals and sea lions, this research has recently expanded to impacts on penguins, shags and other sea birds. Working in collaboration with a Marsden-funded team of zoologists we have used modern and ancient DNA to demonstrate extinctions of early New Zealand lineages of sea lions and Megadyptes penguins, and documented regional variations in impacts of Stewart Island Shags that can be attributed to differences in hunting pressure by Māori. In collaboration with a Marsden-funded marine scientist we are examining isotopic evidence for long-term human impacts on marine food webs supporting New Zealand's fur seal and sea lion populations.

Archaeology of the Hohi Mission

Excavation and analysis of artefact assemblages from the Hohi Mission station, Bay of Islands, the first permanent European settlement in New Zealand. Cultural patterns identified at this site will provide a base line for subsequent changes in Pākehā culture.

The Emergence of Pākehā Culture

Archaeological ethnography of the communities that occupied shore whaling stations at Oashore, Banks Peninsula, and Te Hoe, Mahia Peninsula beginning in the 1840s. It is argued that through comparison with contemporary shore whaling communities in Australia, the emergence of components of New Zealand's distinctive Pākehā culture can be observed.

Taking Stock: Long-term effects of climate change and human impact on New Zealand's marine shelf ecosystems

In collaboration with NIWA, this project used archaeological data on what Māori had harvested from the marine environment, in conjunction with evidence for climatic and other environmental variation to demonstrate that there have been profound changes in the structure and functioning of New Zealand marine shelf ecosystems over the time scale of human occupation.

Teaching

ARCH202 Archaeology of the Modern World

ARCH302 Archaeozoology

ARCH304 New Zealand Archaeology

ARCH402 Material Culture Studies

Publications

in press

Smith, I.W.G. (in press) Regional and chronological variations in energy harvests from prehistoric fauna in New Zealand. In: U. Albarella, H. Russ, K. Vickers, S. Viner-Daniells (eds) The Oxford Handbook of Zooarchaeology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

2015

Maxwell, J.J. and Smith, I.W.G. (2015) A re-assessment of settlement patterns and subsistence at Point Durham, Chatham Island. Archaeology in Oceania. 50(3): 162-174.

Rawlence, N.J., Kennedy, M., Anderson, C.N.K., Prost, S., Till, C.E., Smith, I.W.G., Scofield, R.P., Tennyson, A.J.D., Hamel, J., Lalas, C., Matisoo-Smith, E.A., and Waters, J.M. (2015) Geographically contrasting biodiversity reductions in a widespread New Zealand seabird. Molecular Ecology. 24: 4605-4616.

Rawlence, N., Perry, G., Smith, I., Scofield, P., Tennyson, A., Matisoo-Smith, E., Boessenkool, S., Austin, J., and Waters, J. (2015) Radiocarbon-dating and ancient DNA reveal rapid replacement of extinct prehistoric penguins. Quaternary Science Reviews 112: 59-65

2014

Smith, I.W.G. (2014) Schooling on the missionary frontier: the Hohi mission station, New Zealand. International Journal of Historical Archaeology. 18(4): 612-628.

Smith, I., Middleton, A., Garland, J., and Russell, T. (2014) Archaeology of the Hohi Mission. Volume 2: The 2013 Excavations. Dunedin: University of Otago Studies in Archaeology No 26. 76 p.

Middleton, A. and Smith, I.W.G. (2014) Daily life at Hohi mission station: Archives and archaeology. In: Te Rongopai 1814: 'Takoto Te Pai!' Bicentenary Reflections on Christian Beginnings and Developments in Aotearoa New Zealand. A. Davidson, P. Lineham, S. Lange and A. Puckey (eds.).

Smith, I.W.G. (2014) Oceania, Historical Archaeology of. In: Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology. C. Smith (ed.) New York: Springer-Verlag. pp. 5549-5557.

Smith, I.W.G. and Woods, N. (2014) Artefacts, history and assemblage formation at Te Hoe Whaling Station, New Zealand. Australasian Historical Archaeology 32: 23-34.

Collins, C.J., Rawlence, N.J., Prost, S., Anderson, C., Knapp, M., Scofield, R.P., Robertson, B.C., Smith, I.W.G., Matisoo-Smith, E.A., Chilvers, B.L. and Waters, J.M. (2014) Extinction and recolonisation of coastal megafauna following human arrival in New Zealand. Proceedings of the Royal Society B 281: 20140097.

Collins, C.J., Rawlence, N.J., Worthy, T.H., Scofield, R.P., Tennyson, A.J.D., Smith, I.W.G., Knapp, M., Waters J.M. (2014) Prehuman New Zealand sea lion (Phocarctus hookeri) rookeries on mainland New Zealand. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand 44:1-16.

2013

Smith, I.W.G. (2013) Ephemeral foundations: Early European settlement of the Tasman frontier. In: Finding our Recent Past: Historical Archaeology in New Zealand. M. Campbell, S. Holdaway & S. Macready (eds.) Auckland: New Zealand Archaeological Association Monograph 29, pp 9-32.

Smith, I.W.G. (2013) Pre-European Maori exploitation of marine resources in two New Zealand case study areas: Species range and temporal change. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand. 43(1): 1-37.

Jackson, M. and Smith, I.W.G. (2013) Ownership or tenure? A case study of tribal land use from the cusp of prehistory. In: An Archaeology of Land Ownership. M. Relaki and D. Catapoti (eds.) London: Routledge. pp 154-169.

Smith, I.W.G. and McPherson, S. (2013) Appendix 1: Mammal and bird remains from the Station Bay pa. Tuhinga 24: 45-47.

Clark, G., Petchey, F., Hawkins, S., Reepmeyer, C., Smith, I. and Masse, W.B. (2013) Distribution and extirpation of pigs in Pacific Islands: A case study from Palau. Archaeology in Oceania 48: 141-153.

2012

Smith, I., Middleton, A., Garland, J., and Woods, N. (2012) Archaeology of the Hohi Mission. Volume 1: The 2012 Excavations. Dunedin: University of Otago Studies in Archaeology No 24. 90 p.

Smith, I.W.G. and Garland, J. (2012) Archaeology of St Bathans Cottage Hospital, Central Otago, New Zealand. Australasian Historical Archaeology 30: 52-62.

2011

Smith, I.W.G. (2011) Estimating the Magnitude of Pre-European Maori Marine Harvest in Two New Zealand Study Areas.Wellington: Ministry of Fisheries. New Zealand Aquatic Environment and Biodiversity Report No. 82. 70p.

Smith, I.W.G and Mann, S. (2011) Appendix 1: Mammal and bird remains from Maungarei. Tuhinga 22: 90-94.

Horrocks, M., Smith, I.W.G., Walter, R. and Nichol, S.L. (2011) Stratigraphic and plant microfossil investigation at Cook's Cove, North Island, New Zealand: reinterpretation of Holocene deposits and evidence of Polynesian introduced crops. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand 41(3): 237-258.

Smith, I. (2011) Meat Weight, Nutritional and Energy Yield Values for New Zealand Archaeofauna. Otago Archaeological Laboratory Report Number 8. 23p.

2010

Smith, I.W.G. (2010) Protocols for organising radiocarbon dated assemblages from New Zealand archaeological sites for comparative analysis. Journal of Pacific Archaeology 1:184-187

Butcher, M. and Smith, I.W.G. (2010) Talking trash: a classification of rubbish-bearing deposits from colonial sites in New Zealand. Journal of Pacific Archaeology 1: 53-61.

Smith, I. and James-Lee, T. (2010) Data for an Archaeozoological Analysis of Marine Resource Use in Two New Zealand Study Areas (revised edition). Otago Archaeological Laboratory Report Number 7. 85p.

2009

Smith, I.W.G. (2009) Mammalian Fauna from Sandy Bay, Auckland Islands. In: In Care of the Southern Ocean: An archaeological and historical survey of the Auckland Islands. P. R. Dingwall, K. L. Jones and R. Egerton (eds.) Auckland: New Zealand Archaeological Association Monograph 27, pp. 308-312.

Smith, I.W.G. and Anderson, A.J. (2009) An archaeological sequence for Codfish Island (Whenua Hou), Southland, New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Archaeology. 30: 5-21.

Parsons, D.M., Morrison, M.A., McDiarmid, A.B., Stirling, B., Cleaver, P., Smith, I.W.G. and Butcher, M. (2009) Risks of shifting baselines highlighted by anecdotal accounts of New Zealand's snapper (Pagrus auratus) fishery. New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research. 43: 965-983.

2008

Smith, I.W.G. (2008) Mammalian Fauna from Taumako. In: Archaeology on Taumako: A Polynesian Outlier in the Eastern Solomon Islands. F. Leach and J. Davidson (eds.) Dunedin: New Zealand Journal of Archaeology Special Publication, pp. 401-405.

Smith, I.W.G. (2008) Maori, Pakeha and Kiwi: Peoples, cultures and sequence in New Zealand archaeology. In: Islands of Inquiry: Colonisation, seafaring and the archaeology of maritime landscapes. G. Clark, F. Leach and S. O'Connor (eds.) Canberra: ANU E Press. Terra Australia 29, pp. 367-380.

Horrocks, M., Smith, I.W.G., Nichol, S.L., Wallace, R. (2008) Sediment, soil and plant microfossil analysis of Maori gardens at Anaura Bay, eastern North Island, New Zealand: comparison with descriptions made in 1769 by Captain Cook's expedition.  Journal of Archaeological Science. 35: 2446-2464.

Smith, I. and Prickett, N. (2008) Excavations at Te Hoe, Mahia Peninsula. Otago Archaeological Laboratory Report Number 5. 19p.

Horrocks, M., Smith, I.W.G., Nichol, S.L., Shane, P.A., Jackman, G. (2008) Field survey, sedimentology and plant microfossil analysis of sediment cores from possible cultivation sites at Tolaga Bay, eastern North Island, New Zealand. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand. 38(3): 131-147.

2007

Smith, I.W.G. (2007) Metal Pa Kahawai: a post-contact fishing lure form in northern New Zealand. In: Vastly Ingenious: Essays on Oceanic Material Culture in Honour of Janet Davidson. A. Anderson, K. Green and F. Leach (eds.) Dunedin: Otago University Press, pp. 69-78.

Smith, I. and Anderson, A. (2007) Codfish Island/Whenua Hou Archaeological Project: Preliminary Report. Otago Archaeological Laboratory Report Number 4. 22p.

2006

Walter, R. Smith, I.W.G. and Jacomb, C. (2006) Sedentism, subsistence and socio-political organisation in prehistoric New Zealand World Archaeology 38(2): 274-290.

Smith, I. and Prickett, N. (2006) Excavations at the Oashore Whaling Station. Otago Archaeological Laboratory Report Number 3. 19p.

2005

Smith, I.W.G. (2005) Retreat and resilience: fur seals and human settlement in New Zealand. In: The Exploitation and Cultural Importance of Sea Mammals. G. Monks (ed.) Oxford: Oxbow Books, pp. 6-18.

Harris, J. and Smith, I. (2005) The Te Hoe Shore Whaling Station Artefact Assemblage. Otago Archaeological Laboratory Report Number 2. 134p.

Harris, J. and Smith, I. (2005) Artefacts from the Oashore Shore Whaling Station. Otago Archaeological Laboratory Report Number 1. 110p.

2004

Smith, I.W.G. (2004) Archaeologies of identity: historical archaeology for the 21st century. In: Change Through Time: 50 Years of New Zealand Archaeology. L Furey and S. Holdaway (eds.) Auckland: New Zealand Archaeological Association Monograph 26, pp. 251-262.

Smith, I.W.G. (2004) Nutritional perspectives on prehistoric marine fishing in New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Archaeology. 24: 5-31.

Irwin, G.J., Nichol, R.K., Taylor, M.H., Worthy, T.H. and Smith, I.W.G. (2004) Faunal remains from Kohika. In: Kohika: The Archaeology of a Late Maori Lake Village in the Ngati Awa Rohe, Bay of Plenty, New Zealand. G.J. Irwin (ed.) Auckland: Auckland University Press, pp. 198-216.

2003

Hamel, J., Allen, R., Davis, L., McGovern-Wilson, R., Petchey P., and Smith, I. (2003) The Human Factor. In: The Natural History of Southern New Zealand. J. Darby, R.E. Fordyce, A. Mark, K.Probert and C. Towsend (eds.) Dunedin: Otago University Press, pp. 129-151.

2002

Smith, I.W.G. (2002) The New Zealand Sealing Industry: History, Archaeology and Heritage Management. Wellington: Department of Conservation 72p.

Anderson, A., Haberle, S., Rojas, G., Seelenfreund, A., Smith, I.W.G., and Worthy, T. (2002) An archaeological exploration of Robinson Crusoe Island, Juan Fernandez Archipelago, Chile. In: Fifty Years in the Field: Essays in Honour and Celebration of Richard Shutler Jr's Archaeological Career. S. Bedford, C. Sand and D. Burley (eds.) Auckland: New Zealand Archaeological Association Monograph 25, pp. 239-249.

2001

Anderson, A., Smith, I.W.G. and White, P. (2001) Archaeological fieldwork on Norfolk Island. In: The Prehistoric Archaeology of Norfolk Island, Southwest Pacific. A.Anderson and P. White (eds.) Sydney: Australian Museum, Records of the Australian Museum, Supplement 27, pp. 11-32.

Smith, I.W.G. Clarke, G. and White, P. (2001) Mammalian and reptilian fauna from Emily and Cemetry Bays, Norfolk Island. In: The Prehistoric Archaeology of Norfolk Island, Southwest Pacific. A.Anderson and P. White (eds.) Sydney: Australian Museum, Records of the Australian Museum, Supplement 27, pp. 77-81.

Smith, I.W.G. (2001) New Zealand: Historical Archaeology. In: Encyclopaedia of Archaeology: History and Discoveries. Volume III, N - Z. T. Murray (ed.) Santa Barbara: ABC-Clio, pp. 934-937.

2000

Smith, I.W.G. (2000) Terrestrial fauna from the Kainapirina (SAC) locality excavations, Watom Island. New Zealand Journal of Archaeology. 20: 137-147

1999

Smith, I.W.G. (1999) Settlement permanence and function at Pleasant River Mouth, East Otago. New Zealand Journal of Archaeology. 19: 27-79

1998

Walter, R.K. and Smith, I.W.G. (1998) Identification of a New Zealand fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri) bone in a Cook Island archaeological site. New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research. 32:483-487.

Smith, I.W.G. and Anderson, A.J. (1998) Radiocarbon dates from archaeological rat bones: the Pleasant River case. Archaeology in Oceania. 33: 88-91.

Smith, I.W.G. and Gillies, K.G. (1998) Archaeological Investigations at Facile Harbour, Dusky Sound, February 1998. Report to New Zealand Historic Places Trust and Department of Conservation. 26 p.

1997

Smith, I.W.G. and Gillies, K.G. (1997) Archaeological Investigations at Luncheon Cove, Dusky Sound, February 1997. Report to New Zealand Historic Places Trust and Department of Conservation. 17 p.

1996

Anderson, A.J. and Smith, I.W.G. (1996) The transient village in southern New Zealand. World Archaeology  27(3): 359-371.

Anderson, A.J., Allingham, B., and Smith, I.W.G. (eds.) (1996) Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27. 294p.

Anderson, A.J. and Smith, I.W.G. (1996) Introduction and history of investigations. In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.)  Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 1-13.

Anderson, A.J. and Smith, I.W.G. (1996) Analysis of fish remains.  In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.) Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 237-244.

Anderson, A.J. and Smith, I.W.G. (1996) Shag Mouth as an early southern Maori village. In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.) Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 276-291.

Anderson, A.J., Smith, I.W.G., and Higham, T.F.G. (1996) Radiocarbon chronology. In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.)  Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 60-69.

McGovern-Wilson, R., Allingham, B., Bristow, P. and Smith, I.W.G.(1996) Other artefacts.  In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.) Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 161-181.

McGovern-Wilson, R., Kirk, F. and Smith, I.W.G. (1996) Small bird remains. In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.)  Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 223-236.

Smith, I.W.G. (1996) The field school excavations.  In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.) Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 51-59.

Smith, I.W.G. (1996) The mammal remains.  In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.)  Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 185-199.

Smith, I.W.G. and Anderson, A.J. (1996) Collection, identification and quantification strategies.  In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.)  Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 70-73.

Smith, I.W.G., Campbell, M., and Bristow, P. (1996) Flaked stone tools. In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.)  Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 77-102.

Smith, I.W.G. and Leach, H.M. (1996) Adzes from the excavation and museum collections.  In: Shag River Mouth: the Archaeology of an Early Southern Maori Village.  A.J. Anderson, B. Allingham and I.W.G. Smith (eds.)  Canberra: Australian National University, Research Papers in Archaeology and Natural History No. 27, pp. 103-147.

Smith, I.W.G. (1996) Historical documents and 18th century seal hunting in New Zealand.  In: Oceanic Culture History: Essays in Honour of Roger Green.  J.M. Davidson, G. Irwin, B.F. Leach, A. Pawley and D. Brown (eds.) Dunedin: New Zealand Journal of Archaeology Special Publication, pp. 675-688.

Walter, R., Weisler, M. and Smith, I.W.G. (1996) The Pacific fishbone reference collection at Otago University.  Archaeology in New Zealand. 39:200-212.

1994

Anderson, A.J., Leach, H.M., Smith, I.W.G. and Walter, R.K. (1994) Reconsideration of the Marquesan sequence in East Polynesian prehistory, with particular reference to Hane (MUH1). Archaeology in Oceania. 29:29-52.

Smith, I.W.G. (1994) Organisation and operation of the New Zealand Archaeological Association site recording scheme.  Archaeology in New Zealand. 37:282-299.

1993

Purvis, M., Gaskin, C., Smith, I.W.G. and McLennan, B. (1993) Life at Taiaroa Head:  a Geographical Information System.  In: Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Colloquim of the Spatial Information Research Centre. Dunedin, University of Otago, Dunedin. pp. 265-278.

1992

Anderson, A.J. and Smith, I.W.G. (1992) The Papatowai site: new evidence and interpretations. Journal of the Polynesian Society. 101:129-158.

1991

Smith, I.W.G. (1991) The development of historical archaeology in New Zealand, 1921-1990. Australian Journal of Historical Archaeology 9: 6-13.

1990

Smith, I.W.G. (1990) Historical archaeology in New Zealand: a review and bibliography. New Zealand Journal of Archaeology.  12:85-119.

Smith, I.W.G. and Goodwyn, J. (1990) Portable ceramics from the General Assembly site. Archaeology in New Zealand 33:21-39.

Leach, B.F., Horwood, L.M., McGovern-Wilson, R. Smith, I.W.G., Ottino, P. and Ottino, M-N. (1990) Analysis of Faunal Material from Te Ana Pua, Ua Pou, Marquesas Islands. Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa Technical Report 16. 57p.

1989

Smith, I.W.G. (1989) Fort Ligar:  A colonial redoubt in central Auckland, New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Archaeology.  11:117-141.

Smith, I.W.G. (1989) Maori impact on the marine megafauna: pre-European distributions of New Zealand sea mammals. In: Saying So Doesn't Make It So.  Papers in Honour of B. Foss  Leach. D.G. Sutton (ed.) Dunedin: New Zealand Archaeological Association Monograph 17, pp. 76-108.

Smith, I.W.G. (1989) Rediscovering Fort Ligar. Volume One: Excavation and Site History. Auckland: Department of Conservation, Science and Research Internal Report No. 40. 38p.

Smith, I.W.G. (1989) Bone analysis. In: Archaeological Investigations at Site R11/1519, Cryers Road, East Tamaki, Auckland, New Zealand. C.F.K. Frederickson and E.P. Visser (eds.) Wellington: Department of Conservation Science and Research Series No. 21, pp. 102-106.

1988

Smith, I.W.G. (1988) Bones from Auckland's First Gaol: Faunal Analysis at the National Bank Site (R11/1595) Queen Street, Auckland. Auckland: Department of Conservation, Science and Research Internal Report No 18. 31p.

Leach, B.F., Horwood, L.M. and Smith, I.W.G. (1988) Analysis of Archaeological Fauna from Kaloko, Hawaii. Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa Technical Report 8. 47p.

Leach, B.F., Davidson, J.M., Smith, I.W.G., Horwood, L.M., McGovern-Wilson, R. and Roy, K. (1988) Prehistoric fishing on Kosrae. Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa Technical Report 7. 55p.

1987

Leach, B.F., Horwood, L.M., Smith, I.W.G. and McGovern-Wilson, R. (1987) Analysis of Faunal Material from Songsong Village, Rota, Marianna Islands. Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa Technical Report 6. 54p.

1985

Smith I.W.G. Sea mammal hunting and prehistoric subsistence in New Zealand. PhD thesis, Anthropology, University of Otago.

1984

Leach, B.F., Intoh, M. and Smith, I.W.G. (1984). Fishing, turtle hunting and mammal exploitation at Fa'ahia, Huahine, French Polynesia. Journal de la Societe des Oceanistes 79:183-197.

1981

Smith, I.W.G. (1981) Prehistoric mammalian fauna from the Coromandel Peninsula. Records of the Auckland Institute and Museum 18:107-125.

Smith, I.W.G. (1981) Mammalian fauna from an archaic site on Motutapu Island, New Zealand. Records of the Auckland Institute and Museum 18:95-105.

1979

Smith, I.W.G. (1979) Prehistoric sea mammal hunting in Palliser Bay. In: Prehistoric Man in Palliser Bay.  B.F. Leach and H.M. Leach (eds.) Wellington: National Museum of New Zealand Bulletin 21, pp. 215-249.

Leach, B.F., Davidson, J.M., McCallum, G., Partridge, B., Smith, I.W.G. and Whitehead, N. (1979) The identification of Dugong ivory reel artefacts from strontium content and microstructure. New Zealand Journal of Archaeology 1:115-121.

1978

Smith, I.W.G. (1978) Seasonal sea mammal exploitation and butchering patterns at an archaic site (Tairua, N44/2) on the Coromandel Peninsula. Records of the Auckland Institute and Museum 15:17-26.

1977

Smith, I.W.G. (1977) Prehistoric Fur Seal Exploitation on the South West Coast of Chatham Island. Dunedin: Anthropology Department, University of Otago, Working Papers in Chatham Islands Archaeology No.7. 95p.

1976

Smith, I.W.G. and Wernham, M.P. (1976) Survey of Archaeological Sites: Te Awapatiki to Hapupu, Hanson Bay, Chatham Island. Dunedin: Anthropology Department, University of Otago, Working Papers in Chatham Islands Archaeology No.1. 36p.

Dr Fiona Starr

Fiona Starr is Curator of Hyde Park Barracks Museum, one of the 11 World Heritage Australian Convict Sites, and The Mint, which together form the Macquarie Street Portfolio of Sydney Living Museums. Her role involves the conservation management, research and interpretation of the historic building fabric, in-situ archaeology and assemblages of over 130,000 artefacts excavated from the sites, which address modern world themes of convictism, migration, institutionalisation, industrialisation, science and invention. A trained historical archaeologist and museum curator, Fiona specialises in material culture studies, convict and early colonial history, public archaeology, and the interpretation of archaeology through museums, historic sites, education programs and the web. Her PhD research into World Heritage and cultural heritage site conservation is published as Corporate Responsibility for Cultural Heritage (Routledge, 2013). Fiona is interested in collaborations relating to site conservation and interpretation, the archaeology of convictism and migration, management of archaeological assemblages, and public outcomes for archaeology.

Email Fiona

Dr Ingrid J Sykes

Dr. Ingrid J. Sykes – Brief Curriculum Vitae

Address:
Department of Archaeology and History, History Program,
David Myers Building East, Room 109,
La Trobe University, Bundoora VIC 3086,
Australia. Ph: (+613) 9479 2779; i.sykes@latrobe.edu.au

Research Interests: Scientific, Technological and Medical Culture in French Modern History; Impact of French Colonial Biomedicine on Indigenous Kanak in Twentieth-Century New Caledonia; Medical Waste in Colonial/Post-Colonial Spaces

Australian Research Council 2013 Future Fellow. Jan. 2014- . Department of Archaeology and History, La Trobe University, Melbourne (Total Funding $677 211 AUD). Project: "Microbial Visions: French Colonial Biomedicine in Twentieth-Century New Caledonia."

Lecturer in History, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Historical and European Studies, La Trobe University, Melbourne, July 2011-Dec. 2014.

Wellcome Trust Research Fellow, Centre for the History of Medicine, University of

Warwick,UK. Jan. 2005-Nov. 2010.

Economic and Social Research Council Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of History, University of Warwick, Sep. 2003-Sep. 2004.

Associated Member of the Research Team, Histoire de l'Invention et des Savoirs Techniques, Centre d'Histoire des Techniques (CDHTE), Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers, Paris, France, 2003-2010.

Qualifications

PhD (City University, London); F.R.Hist.S., Fellow, Royal Historical Society, London.

Publications

Books

  1. Society, Culture and the Auditory Imagination in Modern France: The Humanity of Hearing (Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015).
  2. Women, Sound and Science in Nineteenth-Century France, Series: Interdisciplinary Studies in Music (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2007)

Co-Edited Special Issue

  1. "The Fragile Medical: The Slippery Terrain between Medicine, Anthropology and Societies", co-edited with Professor Harish Naraindas (Jawaharal Nehru University, India), Anthropology and Medicine (December 2017), forthcoming.

Journal Articles and Chapters in Edited Volumes

  1. "The Medical Invention of New Caledonia: Protestantism vs. Catholicism and the Struggle of Kanak," The Fragile Medical: The Slippery Terrain between Anthropology, Medicine and Societies, edited by Ingrid Sykes and Harish Naraindas, Anthropology and Medicine (December 2017), forthcoming.
  2. "Disability, Leprosy and Kanak Identity in Twentieth-Century New Caledonia," French and Francophone World Disability Studies, Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies, edited by Tammy Berberi and Christian Flaugh, (2016), forthcoming, in press.
  3. "Sana Ducos: The Last Leprosarium in New Caledonia," Quarantine: Local and Global Histories, edited by Alison Bashford (Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016), forthcoming, in press.
  4. "The Art of Listening: Perceiving Pulse in Eighteenth-Century France," The Five Senses in the Enlightenment, Journal forEighteenth-Century Studies, edited by Jonathan Reinarz and Leonard Schwarz, iVol. 35, No. 4 (Dec. 2012): 473-488.
  5. "Sounding the Citizen Patient: The Politics of Voice in Post-Revolutionary France," Medical History (2011) 55: 479-502.
  6. "Hearing Science in Eighteenth-Century Britain and France," co-authored Penelope Gouk (University of Manchester), Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences 2010; doi 10.1093/jhmas/jrq045.
  7. "Gender and Musical Performance in mid nineteenth-century France: the case of Juliette Godillon," French History 2010; doi: 10.1093/fh/crq056.
  8. "Les produits de l'acoustique: Brevets d'invention de musique 1800-1830," Les archives de l'invention, Ecrits, objets et images de l'activité inventive, edited by Mary-Sophie Corcy, Christiane Douyère-Demeulenaere, Liliane Hilaire-Pérez (Toulouse: CNRS, Université de Toulouse-Le Mirail, 2006), 499-510.

James Symonds

James Symonds, Professor of Historical Archaeology (North of the Alps)

Prof. J. Symonds was has appointed professor of Historical Archaeology (North of the Alps) at the University of Amsterdam's (UvA) Faculty of Humanities in April 2014.

James Symonds's research focuses on the archaeology of the modern world (c.AD 1450-present) and includes work on capitalism, colonialism, landscapes of improvement and diaspora, urban and industrial archaeology, and the archaeology of poverty. Symonds has extensive experience of urban excavation in the UK, and has undertaken field research projects in the Isle of South Uist (Western Isles, Scotland), Nova Scotia and Cape Breton Island (Canada), and Lapland (Finland). He is currently working on two research projects in the Czech Republic. The first examines the changing nature of the Iron Curtain between the 1950s and 1980s, and the second explores the impact of the Thirty Year's War on rural settlements in 17th century Bohemia.

James Symonds studied prehistory and archaeology at the universities of Sheffield and Oxford, and previously worked as a fellow and anniversary research lecturer in Historical Archaeology at the University of York. Prior to that, he was director of Archaeological Research and Consultancy at the University of Sheffield (ARCUS) from 1992-2009.

Symonds holds visiting academic positions at Oulu University (Finland), and the University of West Bohemia (Czech Republic). He is a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (London), a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (Scotland), a fellow of the Higher Education Academy (UK) and a member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (UK).

James Symonds's edited and co-authored books include: The Historical Archaeology of the Sheffield Tableware and Cutlery Industries (BAR, 2002); South Uist: Archaeology & History (Tempus, 2004); Industrial Archaeology: Future Directions (Springer, 2005); Interpreting the Early Modern World: Transatlantic Perspectives (Springer, 2010); Table Settings: The Material Culture and Social Context of Dining, AD 1700-1900 (Oxbow, 2011); Historical Archaeologies of Cognition: Historical Archaeologies of Faith, Hope, and Charity (Equinox, 2013). He has also published widely in international journals such as Historical Archaeology, the Journal of Social Archaeology, the Journal of Material Culture.

uva.academia.edu/JamesSymonds

Email: James Symonds

Dr Barbara L Voss

I am a historical archaeologist who studies the dynamics and outcomes of transnational cultural encounters: How did diverse groups of people, who previously had little knowledge of each other, navigate the challenges and opportunities of abrupt and sustained interactions caused by colonialism, conflict, and migration?

I approach this question through fine-grained, site-specific investigations coupled with broad-scale comparative and collaborative research programs. My earlier work investigated Spanish colonization of the Americas, an area of research that I continue to be involved in.

My current research focuses on 19th century migration from southern China, which I am investigating through three interrelated projects:

  1. the Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project (2002-present), a community-based research program developed to study and interpret the history and archaeology of San Jose's first Chinese community
  2. the interdisciplinary Chinese Railroad Workers of North America Project (2012-present), for which I serve as Director of Archaeology
  3. Research Cooperation on Home Cultures of 19th Century Overseas Chinese, a collaboration with Wuyi University to develop ethnohistoric and archaeological research on qiaoxiang (home villages) in Kaiping County, Guangdong.

Throughout, my research is guided by a deep commitment to public archaeology and collaborative research. Additionally, I continue to work to generate a productive dialogue between queer studies and archaeology, and to develop rigorous methodologies that support the study of sexuality and gender through archaeological evidence.

Diana diZerega Wall

Diana diZerega Wall is an historical archaeologist who specialises in the study of New York City.  On the faculty of the City College of NY and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York, she received her B.A. from City College and her M.A. and Ph.D. from New York University. She specialises in the study of the archaeology of New York City, and has examined various aspects of the city from the Dutch and English colonial period through the 19th century. Her interests include colonialism; urbanization; nation-building; and the construction of class, race, and gender in the 19th century city.  She has been working with Nan Rothschild and Cynthia Copeland on the study of Seneca Village, a 19th century African-American community that was located in today's Central Park.

In addition to numerous articles, Wall has written The Archaeology of Gender: Separating the Spheres in Urban America (Plenum 1994); as well as (with Anne-Marie Cantwell)the award- winning Unearthing Gotham, the Archaeology of New York City (Yale 2001) and Touring Gotham's Archaeological Past (Yale 2004); and (with Nan Rothschild) The Archaeology of American Cities (University of Florida Press 2014). She is currently working on In Hudson's Wake: The Archaeology of New Netherland (with Anne-Marie Cantwell, under contract  to Yale) and is planning a book (with Nan Rothschild) on the Seneca Village project.

www.ccny.cuny.edu/profiles/diana-dizerega-wall

Email: Diana diZerega Wall

Don Walker

Don is a Senior Human Osteologist at MOLA, where he records and reports on human skeletal remains from excavations in London. He is a Member of the Chartered Institute for Archaeologists (MCIfA) and of the British Association of Biological Anthropology and Osteoarchaeology (BABAO)

He has contributed to MOLA monographs on medieval Spitalfields, St Marylebone Church burial ground, Royal London Hospital in Whitechapel, Holywell Priory, and three post-medieval burial grounds in East London. Some of this work has involved collaboration with academics at the University of Bradford and City University London. Don has also written an English Heritage funded text book on palaeopathology in London. He has written papers on pipe smoking, leprosy, syphilis, body snatching and arrow wounds, as well as posters on multiple cranial injury, ‘parry’ fractures and medieval climate change.

Current and recent projects include work on skeletal remains from Charterhouse and Liverpool Street as part of Crossrail, and work on a JISC funded project Digitised Diseases in collaboration with the University of Bradford and the Royal College of Surgeons.

Don also assists the Metropolitan Police in forensic enquiries and has featured in several television documentaries.

Publications and papers: http://mola.academia.edu/DonWalker

Email: dwalker@mola.org.uk

Katharine Watson

Katharine Watson

Senior archaeologist/director, Underground Overground Archaeology Ltd

MA (Dist), University of Otago, 2000
BA (Hons), University of Otago, 1998

P.O. Box 338, Christchurch, 8140
027 656 3985

katharine.watson@underoverarch.co.nz

Career history


Katharine Watson is an archaeological consultant with 15 years' experience documenting the archaeology of Christchurch, Canterbury and the West Coast, New Zealand. Katharine initially worked as an independent consultant but is now the director of Underground Overground Archaeology Ltd, New Zealand's largest archaeological firm. Since February 2011, Katharine's main focus has been archaeological work in Christchurch and its immediate surrounds, including Akaroa, Ashburton, Kaiapoi, Lyttelton and Rangiora. Katharine is particularly interested in the archaeology of standing buildings; the questions that can be answered by looking at the archaeology of Christchurch as a whole, particularly relating to the city' identity and the influence and role of colonialism and capitalism in the city's development; and the archaeology of pastoralism, including the rural-urban divide. Katharine is also a passionate advocate for public archaeology, which has led to the development of the blog Christchurch uncovered.

Major clients/projects

Department of Conservation

Numerous heritage assessments of a range of site types in Canterbury, including pastoral stations, high country huts, early tourist infrastructure at Aoraki/Mt Cook, the Mt Harper Ice Rink and forestry sites.

Christchurch City Council

Recording and documenting the deconstruction of the Canterbury Provincial Council buildings, listed as a Category 1 historic place.
Recording and documenting repairs to various CCC heritage assets, including Mona Vale (Category 1 historic place) and the Rose Chapel.

Solid Energy

Numerous archaeological assessments and surveys of coal mining archaeological sites from the 19th and 20th centuries, particularly on the Stockton plateau.

Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority (CERA)

Provision of archaeological services for all CERA-managed commercial and residential demolitions in Christchurch, Kaiapoi and Lyttelton, including on-site archaeological work and archaeological reporting. Monitoring, excavating and building recording of a range of commercial, domestic, religious and industrial site types.

Stronger Christchurch Infrastructure Rebuild Team (SCIRT)

Provision of archaeological services for the repair of earthquake-damaged horizontal infrastructure, including bridges, stormwater and wastewater services and retaining walls.

Lyttelton Port of Christchurch

Provision of archaeological services for the port repair and rebuild post-earthquake.

Ministry of Justice


Archaeological excavation for the Christchurch Justice and Emergency Services Precinct, resulting in the largest assemblage of material recovered during one project in Christchurch. Domestic, commercial and industrial contexts.

Professional memberships, roles and responsibilities

  • ArchSite Board of Governance
  • ASHA Editorial Board
  • Australasian Society for Historical Archaeology (ASHA)
  • New Zealand Archaeological Association